O'Brien Pro-Am advice

O'Brien Pro-Am advice

Post by Jeff Luede » Wed, 08 Jun 1994 05:49:06


I need some advice.

A co-worker wants to sell me a 1991 O'Brien Pro-Am giant slalom board (145 L)
along with a Weichart mastfoot, downhaul, and universal.  I've seen all
the equipment and its in virtually new condition.  He says that new
equipment would cost about $300 for the board, $50 for the
mastfoot-downhall-universal, plus about $50 for shipping.  We don't
have any board shops in town, so I would otherwise have to use
mail-order.  He says he will sell it all for $200.

I live in a fairly low wind area (Illinois), but we get plaining wind
occasionally, most often in the spring and fall.  I already own an O'Brien
Elite (180 L), can beach start, and would like to learn to water start
soon. I want to learn how to use a slalom board, ride in the straps, etc.  I'm
about 6'2" and 175 lbs.

I realize that the Pro-Am is kind of heavy (30 lbs), but I'm not sure how
much I would be able to appreciate and use a lighter board.

Would this board be a good purchase for me?
Or, should I save my money for a more expensive (lighter) board?
Any comments or advice are really appreciated.

Thanks,

Jeff Lueders

 
 
 

O'Brien Pro-Am advice

Post by Mark sarto » Wed, 08 Jun 1994 10:05:57


Here in Lansing Michigan- sailing on Lake Lansing - NOT Lake Michigan ;)
,
quite a few windsurfers have purchased new
or used Pro Am boards. Seems to be a good cheap sturdy (tho heavy)
introductory transition/slalom board. This board allows sailing in most
wind conditions except the very high amd low limits. OK, so the guys on
the    
AHD boards and their $700 sails blow by me now and then, but I'm getting        
exercise, having fun, and honing my skills until I can afford better
equipment - I just got 2 of the $169 slalom sails (Pacific brand)
a 7.0 and a 5.5 (I also have a 4.1 for anything the 5.5 can't handle -
and believe it or not, there have been some 3.5 days here!) from
Sailboard warehouse... These new sails require massive downhaul, but
now I think I may be able to go a little faster - in relation to the
guys who own some of the higher end equipment.
Anyway,  I think $200 is an OK price, but offer $150 or $175 and see
what he says...   (At least you won't have to pay $1000 or more to
get started on a transition board!)

 
 
 

O'Brien Pro-Am advice

Post by John Kel » Wed, 08 Jun 1994 10:16:33

The only reason you should buy the ProAm is because you can't afford
something nicer.  The weight is really heavy, but the benefit is that
you could probably uphaul it and sail it back if the wind absolutely
shuts down (145 liters is really floaty for a 9'4" board)- another
benefit is that you will never break it (or at least if you did I would
like to see it :-).

-John Kelly (still haven't broken my pro am)

 
 
 

O'Brien Pro-Am advice

Post by Carl Fi » Thu, 09 Jun 1994 23:22:37


Quote:

> I need some advice.

> A co-worker wants to sell me a 1991 O'Brien Pro-Am giant slalom board (145 L)
> along with a Weichart mastfoot, downhaul, and universal.  I've seen all
...
> Would this board be a good purchase for me?
> Or, should I save my money for a more expensive (lighter) board?
> Any comments or advice are really appreciated.

> Thanks,

> Jeff Lueders


Jeff,

I just bought a ProAm for two reasons: its cheap price and its adequate
flotation to make it home when the wind absolutely dies.  I have a little
low volume, custom sinker that is a lotta fun in the right conditions.  But
I like to sail to work, and get stuck at my computer at work when the wind
dies during the day :(  Lacking the bucks to get something nice and most
suited to my requirements, and not wanting a longboard, I tried the ProAm.
I weigh 170 lbs and I can sail it (make it home, upwind, downwind) in a
knot or so of wind, (tho it does take some balance).  Uphauling is easy.
And when the wind is good, with a nice G10 fin, she really does fine
performance wise - for the money.  I've heard tales about the nose lacking
scoop, but I have no problem with it.  If you encournter a problem, you can
"custom" bend these poly boards like the old days with the Windsurfer
brand.

For *cheap* thrills, you can't go too far wrong with this board.

--
H. Carl Fitz
MIIEE, Univ. of Maryland

 
 
 

O'Brien Pro-Am advice

Post by Craig Goud » Fri, 10 Jun 1994 06:56:17

Quote:

>I need some advice.
>A co-worker wants to sell me a 1991 O'Brien Pro-Am giant slalom board (145 L)
>along with a Weichart mastfoot, downhaul, and universal.  I've seen all
>the equipment and its in virtually new condition.  He says that new
>equipment would cost about $300 for the board, $50 for the
>mastfoot-downhall-universal, plus about $50 for shipping.  We don't
>have any board shops in town, so I would otherwise have to use
>mail-order.  He says he will sell it all for $200.
>I live in a fairly low wind area (Illinois), but we get plaining wind
>occasionally, most often in the spring and fall.  I already own an O'Brien
>Elite (180 L), can beach start, and would like to learn to water start
>soon. I want to learn how to use a slalom board, ride in the straps, etc.  I'm
>about 6'2" and 175 lbs.
>I realize that the Pro-Am is kind of heavy (30 lbs), but I'm not sure how
>much I would be able to appreciate and use a lighter board.

You'd definately appreciate a lighter board, but at ProAm Prices
you can use it for a year and decide if you like it.

Quote:
>Would this board be a good purchase for me?
>Or, should I save my money for a more expensive (lighter) board?
>Any comments or advice are really appreciated.

Sell it for $150 after you decide if you like short boards.  
After you've ridden it you'll know more about what you want.

I own one which my kids use.  Nearly indestructable.  They like
it.  I don't ride it.

Quote:
>Thanks,
>Jeff Lueders


8'10" Bailey jump, 9'9" Sailboards Maui
Wt 155#, Ht 6'3", Usually sail on high desert lakes near SLC in Ut
Go short or go home
 
 
 

O'Brien Pro-Am advice

Post by Jimbo S. Harr » Sun, 12 Jun 1994 02:57:55

Quote:


>>I need some advice.
>>A co-worker wants to sell me a 1991 O'Brien Pro-Am giant slalom board (145 L)
>>along with a Weichart mastfoot, downhaul, and universal.  I've seen all
>>the equipment and its in virtually new condition.  He says that new
>>equipment would cost about $300 for the board, $50 for the
>>mastfoot-downhall-universal, plus about $50 for shipping.  We don't
>>have any board shops in town, so I would otherwise have to use
>>mail-order.  He says he will sell it all for $200.
>>I live in a fairly low wind area (Illinois), but we get plaining wind
>>occasionally, most often in the spring and fall.  I already own an O'Brien
>>Elite (180 L), can beach start, and would like to learn to water start
>>soon. I want to learn how to use a slalom board, ride in the straps, etc.  I'm
>>about 6'2" and 175 lbs.

A neat thing about this board for someone your size is that you should be
able to uphaul it and slog home, even in low-to-no wind conditions. I'm a
little larger than you, and have a tougher time of uphauling my Pro Am, but
it's nice to know that if you really can't do a waterstart, you can still get
back to shore.

Quote:
>>Would this board be a good purchase for me?
>>Or, should I save my money for a more expensive (lighter) board?
>>Any comments or advice are really appreciated.

This is my only (current) shortboard; I'm about to pass it on to my
girlfriend and get something smaller, but for $200 you really can't go wrong;
the prices you quoted seem about right.

My next shortboard, I'm going to look for a really nice one; I think I'll
really be sailing it for quite awhile. But I was really glad to have the Pro
Am under me while learning to beach/waterstart -- rocks? what *scrape*
rocks?
--

--- System Administrator, Statsci division of Mathsoft, Inc., Seattle, WA
--- Exceptions always outnumber rules.

 
 
 

O'Brien Pro-Am advice

Post by Software Resear » Sun, 12 Jun 1994 05:40:36

Quote:



>Jeff,

>I just bought a ProAm for two reasons: its cheap price and its adequate
>flotation to make it home when the wind absolutely dies.  I have a little
>low volume, custom sinker that is a lotta fun in the right conditions.  But
>I like to sail to work, and get stuck at my computer at work when the wind

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Whaooo, you must be the luckiest man alive, not counting Windsurfing
Pros who do that for a living. What do you do when it's windy?
Sail til tired before showing up for work?

-Hong

Quote:
>dies during the day :(  Lacking the bucks to get something nice and most
>suited to my requirements, and not wanting a longboard, I tried the ProAm.
>I weigh 170 lbs and I can sail it (make it home, upwind, downwind) in a
>knot or so of wind, (tho it does take some balance).  Uphauling is easy.
>And when the wind is good, with a nice G10 fin, she really does fine
>performance wise - for the money.  I've heard tales about the nose lacking
>scoop, but I have no problem with it.  If you encournter a problem, you can
>"custom" bend these poly boards like the old days with the Windsurfer
>brand.

>For *cheap* thrills, you can't go too far wrong with this board.

>--
>H. Carl Fitz
>MIIEE, Univ. of Maryland