Moronic Fin Installation Question

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by Bat Nw » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00


After a two-year layoff from sailing, I broke down and snagged a Seatrend
All Star yesterday -- first new equipment in five+ years. (Thanks, BTW,
to those who responded by email to my query here, and to others whom I
tracked down with questions.)

As I was admiring the board on the garage floor at home, I decided to
install the fin and see what it looked like. It wouldn't fit in the box.

I've never had a board with this kind of fin box before. The fin wouldn't
go in very far (it jams about in the middle), and I didn't want to force
it. What's the proper method? Trust the screws to draw the fin into the
box? File/sand the fin-top where it inserts? File/sand the box?

I hate to ask such a stupid question here, but the board shop is closed
today and tomorrow, and I wanna sail today if any wind shows up.

Thanks in advance for any help.

bn

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by Derek Mitche » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00

I bought an All Star about 3 weeks ago. Luckily the dealer's service
included fitting the fin and straps - which he did a great job of doing.
I would take it back to the dealer and ask him to fit it for you - even
if it means forgoing a days sailing. I would not force the fin in as you
may find it very dificult to extract and also I would sand the fin before
I sanded the inside of the fin box. I have a G10 Reverse 480 which fitted
like a glove (not OJ's!) The tuttle fin box is the only thing I dislike
about the board ito the time taken over and above say that for a
powerbox.

I am very happy with my All Star sailed it 3 times now in wind (10 -
14knts) where I would normally have been cursing from the shore line,
with my old gear. Each time I sail it I am more impressed.

Good luck and enjoy.
Derek



Quote:
> After a two-year layoff from sailing, I broke down and snagged a Seatrend
> All Star yesterday -- first new equipment in five+ years. (Thanks, BTW,
> to those who responded by email to my query here, and to others whom I
> tracked down with questions.)

> As I was admiring the board on the garage floor at home, I decided to
> install the fin and see what it looked like. It wouldn't fit in the box.

> I've never had a board with this kind of fin box before. The fin wouldn't
> go in very far (it jams about in the middle), and I didn't want to force
> it. What's the proper method? Trust the screws to draw the fin into the
> box? File/sand the fin-top where it inserts? File/sand the box?

> I hate to ask such a stupid question here, but the board shop is closed
> today and tomorrow, and I wanna sail today if any wind shows up.

> Thanks in advance for any help.

> bn

--
Derek


 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by NLW TFW » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00

Many, if not most, Tuttle fins (or boxes) need a little (or a lot of) hand
sanding to fit. The slightest dab of paint or resin in the box needs to be
removed. The Hood River Sailboard Warehouse a few years ago was accustomed to
trying large piles of fins to try to minimize sanding in each new Seatrend they
sold, and often sent boards back to Seatrend (down the road at that time) to
try to get one with a compatible box.

Just don't overdo the sanding; unsanding is sort of like cutting a rope longer
after cutting it too short.

Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by Bat Nw » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00


says...

Quote:
> I bought an All Star about 3 weeks ago.

<snip>

Quote:
> I am very happy with my All Star sailed it 3 times now in wind (10 -
> 14knts) where I would normally have been cursing from the shore line,
> with my old gear. Each time I sail it I am more impressed.

Thanks for the reply. I'm looking forward to getting the board out and, I
hope, getting back into the sport. My biggest problem for many years
(hell, as long as I've sailed) has been that I haven't lived in locations
blessed with frequently favorable conditions. And, like most, I can't
ditch what I'm doing very often (less now than once upon a time) to chase
wind. The reason I dropped out was that I came to a realization the sport
was giving me more funk than fun. On windy days, I'd almost always find
myself staring out the window from some starched-shirt meeting at work,
with a longing in my heart and a sick knot in my stomach. On the days I
could sail, I'd most often end up either pigging through glassy water --
***-necking pitifully in search of a wind line, trying to pump onto a
plane at every feeble, passing whisper of a breeze -- or sitting on the
shore by an expensive pile of virtually unused equipment, cursing my luck
and shaking a***at God. Who needs it?

But I decided to give windsurfing another shot. It sounds like equipment
(especially sail design) has improved significantly over the past five
years, yielding quicker, more sustainable planing and extended range; I'm
in a hiatus between jobs (with an objective of trying to figure out what
I want to do with the next 5-10 years of life); my kids (8 and 10) are
old enough to introduce to windsurfing; and at 45 I'm trying to hang on
as long as possible to at least some of the edge I once had.

So I'm banking big-time on the All Star as my salvation. <g> The pressure
is on, Seatrend. The last one of your boards I had was a Randy French 9'
5" (it was a great one). If what I have read and heard in the past couple
of days is half true, the design of this board could be a great boon to
sailing in locations with most frequently marginal and gusty conditions.
Then again .... We'll see.

bn

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by Bat Nw » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> Many, if not most, Tuttle fins (or boxes) need a little (or a lot of) hand
> sanding to fit. The slightest dab of paint or resin in the box needs to be
> removed.

<snip>

Thanks for the reply. Someone else emailed me with a suggestion to try
t*** the *** that protrudes slightly into the finbox cavity as a
result of torqueing down the metal plate (which secures the flap). I had
thought about that, but passed since it didn't appear from abrasion
residue where the fin inserts that it was tight in the area where the
*** extends. But I went back and trimmed it anyway, and damn if it
didn't fit very nicely afterwards. It doesn't make sense to me 'cause
that isn't where it had been jamming. But it worked. So now I wait for
wind. There is nothing new under the sun.

bn

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by NLW TFW » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00

Bat --
Don't you have vacation time in your profession? If you can find old copies of
Northwest Sailboard in a sailing friend's closet, check out "Time Out for
Windsday Sailing" in their  Fall '91 issue. There are many ways busy
professionals can catcn most windy weekdays -- "Windsdays".

Mike \m/

Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by Bat Nw » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00



Quote:
> Don't you have vacation time in your profession? If you can find old copies of
> Northwest Sailboard in a sailing friend's closet, check out "Time Out for
> Windsday Sailing" in their  Fall '91 issue. There are many ways busy
> professionals can catcn most windy weekdays -- "Windsdays".

I'll look for it. A lot of factors conspired to take me out of action.
First, having kids (which isn't a complaint) and facing the struggle of
balancing personal, self-absorbed activities with family activities.

Professionally, I've spent the past 16+ years in corporate life where
commitments and others' dependencies often didn't permit *ad hoc* time
off in response to a 20 knot front. And I've never lived in a place where
weather forecasting (or even reporting, oftentimes) was dependable.

I've been in the Denver area for the past 5 1/2 years.  Windsurfing Mecca
it ain't. Mountain biking local trails (many accessible from my back
door) and backpacking/canyoneering trips to Utah sorta displaced
windsurfing. But I've missed it. And I'm e***d at the prospect of going
back out. I expect to take most of the summer off from full-time work, so
I'm not going to have any good excuses for not sailing.

bn

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by NLW TFW » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00

Re:"A lot of factors conspired to take me out of action.
First, having kids (which isn't a complaint) and facing the struggle of
balancing personal, self-absorbed activities with family activities."

Gotta get that family hooked on sailing, or at least on going to the beach. I
agree that family comes first, but maybe their choices can match yours with a
little "training".

RE:"Professionally, I've spent the past 16+ years in corporate life where
commitments and others' dependencies often didn't permit *ad hoc* time
off in response to a 20 knot front."

The Windsday article starts off with, "I thought my Windsday sailing was over
when I was assigned to manage 150 people spending $40,000,000 annually on Star
Wars research. But I developed a plan that got me wet most Windsdays, and it
should work for you, too." The article is not deep, or thorough, or a
revelation, but it does offer some encouraging partial solutions to the
problem.

RE:"And I've never lived in a place where  weather forecasting (or even
reporting, oftentimes) was dependable."

That's the downside. MAN, but it was irritating to sacrifice some brownie
points at work, use up a day's vacation time, spend $40 on gas to drive 370
miles for a round trip to the lake, and get SKUNKED. We got REAL picky after a
few of those, but the 40-knot days made it worthwhile. NM can't be MUCH better
than CO.

But the bottom line is that any sport so thoroughly dependent on the weather is
at great odds with a constrained career and/or a mountainous location. Are
windier/wetter locations beyond consideration? Salt Lake City (if skiing is an
acceptable alternative with some windsufing options), San Francisco, Portland,
etc.?

Or my busy friend Greg's solution: he gave up local windchasing in favor of a
couple of sure-thing destination trips per year.

Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by Bat Nw » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00



Quote:

> Gotta get that family hooked on sailing, or at least on going to the beach. I
> agree that family comes first, but maybe their choices can match yours with a
> little "training".

I held onto my first board (an Equipe) for over ten years in the hope
that my wife might someday learn on it. But she's a beach potato. My
kids, now 8 and 10, are showing an interest though; and getting them into
it would be great. In fact, I took my son along today on a long surveying
circuit of local lakes and launch sites

Quote:

> The Windsday article starts off with, "I thought my Windsday sailing was over
> when I was assigned to manage 150 people spending $40,000,000 annually on Star
> Wars research. But I developed a plan that got me wet most Windsdays, and it
> should work for you, too." The article is not deep, or thorough, or a
> revelation, but it does offer some encouraging partial solutions to the
> problem.

I need to find it. Do you have a copy you could fax?

Quote:

> That's the downside. MAN, but it was irritating to sacrifice some brownie
> points at work, use up a day's vacation time, spend $40 on gas to drive 370
> miles for a round trip to the lake, and get SKUNKED.

I've seen that movie too many times.

Quote:
> NM can't be MUCH better
> than CO.

Probably not. Most of my semi-serious sailing days were spent in and
around Kansas City. I used to burn up the highway to Lake Wilson (200+
miles west) every chance I got -- sand bottom, reasonably clear water and
clean wind. But I used up a fair amount of time and credit getting
skunked too.

Quote:

> But the bottom line is that any sport so thoroughly dependent on the weather is
> at great odds with a constrained career and/or a mountainous location. Are
> windier/wetter locations beyond consideration? Salt Lake City (if skiing is an
> acceptable alternative with some windsufing options), San Francisco, Portland,
> etc.?

Not beyond consideration. The question is how to weigh everything in the
balance. That's why I'm taking some time before I jump into the next
fulltime commitment.

Quote:

> Or my busy friend Greg's solution: he gave up local windchasing in favor of a
> couple of sure-thing destination trips per year.

That's what I used to do. Having babies put a damper on it a little when
the family was along 'cause I always felt like I was abandoning my wife
with all the responsibility -- not to mention having to deal with her
rather narrow-minded view that I ought to want to spend significant
vacation time with her. If you go somewhere where you *know* where and
when the wind is going to blow, then you can plan other activities around
sailing. But, except for Maui, it's never worked out that way for me.

I do take one or two trips a year by myself, and I've thought alot about
picking a windsurfing destination. The problem is that every one else
would want to go too. (I just this week mentioned Bonaire -- not a chance
I'll do it alone.) If, on the other hand, I say I'm going to spend eight
days backpacking in Utah, my wife doesn't offer even a pretense of
interest in going. <g> Maybe if I picked a windsurfing destination where
toilet paper was prohibited .... ?

Thanks for your thoughtful reply. I enjoyed it.

bn

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by Steve and Jeann » Mon, 25 May 1998 04:00:00

Hi all. Interesting thread.  I would share my own experience if
interested.  After 16 years of successful corporate life, my wife, my
two dogs and I took off for 15 months. I managed to get about 4 months
of sailing in during that time (rest was travelling to interesting parts
of the earth). The cost: slipped back a bit on the old corporate ladder.
Now trying to decide if I should do a reverse ladder (another trip and
another demotion) or retire as early as possible.  Needless to say it
was worth it.  But money is a good thing.  Not perhaps an option to
those who have kids.

My advice is to do what you have to to bring quality to your life. Move
if you can to an area that supports windsurfing.  The Gorge is a great
place (cheap land and ample sailing) if you can have a productive
living. Those who telecommute are lucky.

 
 
 

Moronic Fin Installation Question

Post by NLW TFW » Tue, 26 May 1998 04:00:00

Re:"The cost: slipped back a bit on the old corporate ladder.
Now trying to decide if I should do a reverse ladder (another trip and
another demotion) or retire as early as possible."

Been dere; Did dat. But 1) we have no kids, 2) the wife loves her work, 3) she
makes good money, and 4) I have a pension. It probably cost me a rung on the
ladder (promotion to lieutenant colonel), but that loss amounted to $100 a
month reduction in retirement pay -- and kept me from having to move to
Washington, D.C. I'd say I won hands down.

Mike \m/
Never Leave Wind To Find Wind