Big Waves Big Fun // Underwater Breathing Thingo

Big Waves Big Fun // Underwater Breathing Thingo

Post by Slartybartfas » Sat, 04 May 1996 04:00:00


G,day all , Has anyone out their heard of an underwater breathing device
(mini scuba device )  that is used for surfing / sailing in big waves. ?
apparently it is strapped to the inside of the forearm and if you wipe
out on a mean one and need to take a breath of air then this thing may
save your life ?
Does anyone know where these things are available, at what cost and how
they are refilled and how long they last ???

and may the fjords be with you.

 
 
 

Big Waves Big Fun // Underwater Breathing Thingo

Post by Mark 'Cecil' DeFrie » Mon, 06 May 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

> G,day all , Has anyone out their heard of an underwater breathing device
> (mini scuba device )  that is used for surfing / sailing in big waves. ?
> apparently it is strapped to the inside of the forearm and if you wipe
> out on a mean one and need to take a breath of air then this thing may
> save your life ?
> Does anyone know where these things are available, at what cost and how
> they are refilled and how long they last ???

I wonder if we're talking about a 'Pony Bottle' here.... a miniature spare
scuba tank that many divers use for spare air?  It's about 5 inches in
diameter and maybe a little over a foot long.

If we are, I can't see using it without serious risk.  If you were caught
under 'the big one' and had to turn to your little bottle and suck in a
lungful of (compressed) air at, say 15 feet of depth, and then eventually
shot up to the surface without exhaling this air (remember, we all tend to
hold our breath under there, no matter what) your lungs would explode -
embolism - serious death.

The air that you sucked in at 15 feet would have been compressed to that
depth, and as you rose and the surrounding water pressure was less, the
air would correspondingly expand until it burst your lungs.  Sure, there
is a solution here, divers are taught to breath out in such an emergency
as they rise.... but one little mistake and.....

.... no more sailing.

Mark DeFriest
Perth, Australia

--
Mark 'Cecil' DeFriest

     Perth  Australia