duck jibes and shoulder injury

duck jibes and shoulder injury

Post by <U52.. » Wed, 16 Aug 1995 04:00:00


Has anyone noticed the duck jibes might cause shoulder problems?

Within the past few years,posting of shoulder problems and recommendations for
 "The Seven Minute Rotator Cuff Solution" led me to learn about this muscle
group and the reverse arm wrestling movement involved.  Recently as I was at-
temping to learn a duck jibe with a 6.0 sail and "pulling the sail aggressively
 as it past my face." I noticed that the aggressive pull can be that same rev.
arm wrestling movement and thus could damage the small muscle doing much of the
 work.  The book mentioned above suggest never going over 20 pounds when
doing the exercise movement.
  My tentative conclusion is:  duck jibes with large sails or heavy mast/sails
could cause shoulder injury.  Other than small sails or light mast/sails, I
guess prevention could include using a straighter arm, using a body twist
action to pull the sail, or superior sail balance to lighten the force needed.
Any proficient duck jibers agree with this?
Bob.

 
 
 

duck jibes and shoulder injury

Post by cbh » Thu, 17 Aug 1995 04:00:00

|>Has anyone noticed the duck jibes might cause shoulder problems?

 
 
 

duck jibes and shoulder injury

Post by Renato Pajaro » Fri, 18 Aug 1995 04:00:00

Quote:


> |>Has anyone noticed the duck jibes might cause shoulder problems?

Hae, what the heck should this be ... Sure, every action which involves
shoulders can cause shoulder problems, but I don't see any speciality that
could come from the duck jibe.

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duck jibes and shoulder injury

Post by Joe Pas » Fri, 18 Aug 1995 04:00:00

: Any proficient duck jibers agree with this?
: Bob.

Don't know if this would aggravate injured shoulders, but I've duck
jibed a 7.2 before without injuring anything. I'm by no means saying
that you couldn't injure your shoulder, but I don't know of anyone who
has...

I guess that timing of the duck might have something to do with how
heavy the sail feels, if you let go real early in the turn, the pulling
force from the sail will be greater...

Might have to defer this one to the doctors in the group.

Shred well,

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"Gentlemen, you have undertaken to cheat me.  I will not sue you,
 for law takes too long.  I will ruin you.", Cornelius Vanderbilt

 
 
 

duck jibes and shoulder injury

Post by Ian Knigh » Fri, 18 Aug 1995 04:00:00

Quote:

> Has anyone noticed the duck jibes might cause shoulder problems?

> Within the past few years,posting of shoulder problems and recommendations for
>  "The Seven Minute Rotator Cuff Solution" led me to learn about this muscle
> group and the reverse arm wrestling movement involved.  Recently as I was at-
> temping to learn a duck jibe with a 6.0 sail and "pulling the sail aggressively
>  as it past my face." I noticed that the aggressive pull can be that same rev.
> arm wrestling movement and thus could damage the small muscle doing much of the
>  work.  The book mentioned above suggest never going over 20 pounds when
> doing the exercise movement.
>   My tentative conclusion is:  duck jibes with large sails or heavy mast/sails
> could cause shoulder injury.  Other than small sails or light mast/sails, I
> guess prevention could include using a straighter arm, using a body twist
> action to pull the sail, or superior sail balance to lighten the force needed.
> Any proficient duck jibers agree with this?
> Bob.

I've been trying to perfect duck gybes since the first appeared on our lake more
than 10 years ago.  The local sailboard mag credited a fellow by the
name of Mike Eskimo with the invention, is that true?  I've mainly been using
a 6.2 sail with heavyweight mast and boom. I'm about 80 kg. My problems are
with co ordination rather than over strain.

Duck gybes being a showy rather than most reliable way of doing the job
it is important to do it with consummate ease rather than aggressively
( based on my observations of other sailors).

Some variations which might help you rest strained muscles.

If you initiate the gybe from a closer reach with the sail closely sheeted
you can depower with a slighter, less strenuous  sheeting in movement.
 Do not do too
much until you feel the sail depower.  The disadvantage of this approach is
you have a larger arc to travel while depowered and may fall off the plane
losing some of the desired effect. It is also harder to get the required
entry speed using  a closer reach.

Another trick if you sail on inland water is to initiate as
soon as you pass the maximum windspeed of the gust. The apparent
wind during the turn is now very low making sail handling easier.

The disadvantage is that on finishing you are in a lull and
once again in danger of losing the plane.

cheers Ian