"sink tail" jibe?

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Benjamin Cris » Fri, 23 Jul 1993 03:25:01


I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

Typically I see it done while heading away from shore in front of a
wave, in order to ride it instead of jumping it, and in any situation
where you want to minimize losing ground downwind.

Can someone email me tips on doing it in high winds on a wave board.
I've tried emulating other sailors without much success.

Thanks,
Ben

 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Matthew Slayt » Fri, 23 Jul 1993 21:06:01

Quote:

>I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
>they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
>tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

>Typically I see it done while heading away from shore in front of a
>wave, in order to ride it instead of jumping it, and in any situation
>where you want to minimize losing ground downwind.

        It sounds like your refering to a "light wind" type jibe.
        I do this sometimes on my short board instead of tacking,
        as coming about on a small board can be tricky, esp in swells.

Quote:
>Can someone email me tips on doing it in high winds on a wave board.
>I've tried emulating other sailors without much success.

        I don't see how, or why you would want to "slow down"
        and sink the tail in high winds.  Jibe off the face of the
        wave and then ride it in, much more fun!


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"sink tail" jibe?

Post by felix.cabr » Fri, 23 Jul 1993 22:30:24

Quote:


>>I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
>>they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
>>tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

>    I don't see how, or why you would want to "slow down"
>    and sink the tail in high winds.  Jibe off the face of the
>    wave and then ride it in, much more fun!

I disagree. I have lots of FUN coming into a high speed "snap jibe"
with my short board. The faster the snap the more fun it is to me. Its
a good way to spray your friends with water. Its also a good way to
jibe extremely quick in a small area (ie between a jibe mark and a downed
sailor).

Try it! You'll be hooked :-)

--

AT&T Bell Labs       {  att!cdsdb1!felixc  }       a rad board, rad waves,
Holmdel,NJ           {    (908)949-1188    }       and a company sickday!"

 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Jonathan M. Richardos » Fri, 23 Jul 1993 22:34:08


Quote:

>I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
>they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
>tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

This used to be called a scissor jybe.

Jonathan M. Richardson
NIST (The National Institute of Standards and Technology)
Building 235, Room A103
Gaithersburg  MD  20899
Phone 301-975-4663
FAX   301-921-9847

 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by David San » Fri, 23 Jul 1993 23:47:03

Quote:


>>I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
>>they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
>>tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

.....

Quote:
>    It sounds like your refering to a "light wind" type jibe.
.....  
>    I don't see how, or why you would want to "slow down"
>    and sink the tail in high winds.  Jibe off the face of the
>    wave and then ride it in, much more fun!

I don't completely agree with this - I think "sink tail jibes" --also
known as "slam gybes" (sounds more radical huh?) and "scissor gybes"
(in reference to the scissor-like action of the legs with the front
leg pushing and the back leg pulling)-- can be a pretty dynamic moves.

Of course they get harder as the wind increases (relative to sail
size) and are best performed when slightly underpowered.  You usually
need to slow down a bit, but this can be done pretty suddenly.  One of
the key points is that you initiate the "slam" by turn slightly _into_
the wind. The back foot needs to be well back on the board (and the
front foot stays in the strap) - good deck-grip helps here.
Also a steep piece of chop is very handy (as always). The
board is not carved round, but pivoted - a bit like a "light wind
gybe" but the main difference (apart from the speed of the move)
is the use of a scissor action with the legs as described above.

I think it is a pretty useful gybe - especially in waves - but I won't
disagree with Matt on the fun of carving round on a wave face! One
natural progression of this move is the jump gybe, although my version
is still a bit on the wet side ;-)

Good sailing

Dave.

 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by ROGER NIGHTINGA » Sat, 24 Jul 1993 02:24:00

Snap jibes are extremely useful in sideshore conditions, when you don't
want to lose ground downwind. If you have to sacrifice on extra bottom
turn or off the lip to do a regular jibe its not workth it. I'll take
the extra off the lip every time.

 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Scott Smi » Sat, 24 Jul 1993 02:53:44

Quote:

>Snap jibes are extremely useful in sideshore conditions, when you don't
>want to lose ground downwind. If you have to sacrifice on extra bottom
>turn or off the lip to do a regular jibe its not workth it. I'll take
>the extra off the lip every time.

And, if you want to see Robbie doing it step-by-step, check out this
months Windsurfing magazine  (I just got mine yesterday).

Scott
--
Best of the .sig's:
"Life shrinks or expands in direct proportion to one's courage"
--Anais Nin

 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Cris Han » Sat, 24 Jul 1993 03:27:56

Quote:

> I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
> they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
> tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

It's probably a *snap* jibe, and the latest issue of WINDSURFING shows
Robbie Naish doing a laydown, carving, and snap jibe.  Check it out.

Quote:
> Can someone email me tips on doing it in high winds on a wave board.
> I've tried emulating other sailors without much success.

It should be a lot easier on a wave board because you can really hammer
the rail, without having it knife into the water like a slalom board.
As far as doing it in high winds, unless you want to nail someone with
a load of water, why bother?  If you're trying to make up ground up-wind,
I'd just tack (nose, short board, etc...).  Otherwise, a planing jibe will
get you on your way (no, your other way) a lot quicker.

Cris
--
Cris Hannu                       |  Windsurfing the high country.


 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Rolland Wate » Sat, 24 Jul 1993 03:57:03


Quote:

> >       I don't see how, or why you would want to "slow down"
> >       and sink the tail in high winds.  Jibe off the face of the
> >       wave and then ride it in, much more fun!

> I disagree. [...] It's also a good way to jibe extremely quick in a small
> area (ie between a jibe mark and a downed sailor).

It's also a good jibe to know for when you hit a massive loop right
off the point at the hatchery, and you're no longer planing but you
still need to jibe.  (Or more likely, you've just waterstarted and you're
about to get run over by a barge and you'd really like to be going the
other direction.)

Rolland

--

 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Pierre Jolicoe » Sat, 24 Jul 1993 09:21:07


Quote:


>>I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
>>they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
>>tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

I recommend Shortboard Sailing Technique II (or whatever its actually
called), a video tape produced by Hoodriver Windsurfing.  They
go over what they call a 'snap' jibe step by step.
PJ
 
 
 

"sink tail" jibe?

Post by Kirk Lindstr » Tue, 27 Jul 1993 00:28:59

Quote:
>> I often see sailors doing what I call a sink tail jibe. It looks like
>> they slow down, lean back, raking the sail backwards and sinking the
>> tail of the board, pivot the board around, then flip the sail.

>It's probably a *snap* jibe, and the latest issue of WINDSURFING shows
>Robbie Naish doing a laydown, carving, and snap jibe.  Check it out.

This move sounds like the slow, low wind jibe one uses to get upwind
(like out past the swimming area at Coyote Pt) when you can't tack.

Quote:
>> Can someone email me tips on doing it in high winds on a wave board.
>> I've tried emulating other sailors without much success.

>It should be a lot easier on a wave board because you can really hammer
>the rail, without having it knife into the water like a slalom board.
>As far as doing it in high winds, unless you want to nail someone with
>a load of water, why bother?  If you're trying to make up ground up-wind,
>I'd just tack (nose, short board, etc...).  Otherwise, a planing jibe will
>get you on your way (no, your other way) a lot quicker.

>Cris
>--

I haven't mastered tacking but can snap jibe my very difficult to jibe
course slalom board.  The snap jibe is VERY useful at crowded sailing
sites like Candlestick or the Gorge where if is hard to find room to
carve a slalom board.  I learned it by accident while running out of room
waiting for the downwind sailors to jibe (and make them) while screaming
towards shore.....Nice thing about course boards is they have flat
bottoms and thus stop quickly compared to a wave board.

Kirk out
8'8" ASD epoxy RKT, 8'11" & 9'3" ASD epoxy CS, Malibu & 8'8" ChallengeFlex
(The Mailbu and CFlex are for sale)
Wt 216#, Ht.  6'0", Usually sail on SF Bay, Cailf.