race jibes aka laydown jibes

race jibes aka laydown jibes

Post by felix.cabr » Thu, 24 Dec 1992 00:36:41


I'll put my two cents in on this but I'm definitely no "god". First thing
I'd say is you don't have to have a race board for this move. It can be done
with 12' course boards as well as sinker wave boards.

I learned this jibe in cabarete off wave faces. Its much easier to laydown
the sail when your angled on a wave face. I think the most important part
of the jibe is the initiation. You have to commit yourself to the turn
as soon as you begin the jibe. The second most important thing is to pull
your clew hand (backhand) up, back and over the tail of the board. Do this as
you lean forward and over the booms. If you don't pull the clew up over
the board you won't be able to lay it down without the clew hitting the water.

Your front hand needs to push the mast as parallel as possible over the
water. At the same time pull the mast back towards the tail as mentioned above.
As you carve the board you feel it accelerate through the turn. Quickly
step forward with your back foot while pulling the sail up in order to "flip
it" or change tacks. Do this before the board turns too much into the wind.
If you wait too long you won't be able to pull the sail up without getting
backwinded. This last step is much like the end of the step jibe. You step
forward to maintain board speed and to flatten the board out of the carve.

This is a very fast jibe. It helps in many ways not only with speed. I find
by laying the sail down in strong winds I don't get overpowered or spinout
during the jibe. My problem is I do it much better on starboard than port.

A key thing to remember is the longer the carve the longer you can hold
the sail down over the water. In shorter carves you laydown the sail for
only a split second. Also, don't hesitate to lean over the rig and pushing
down on the boom. Body position is very important.

--

AT&T Bell Labs       {  att!mtgzfs3!felixc  }       a rad board, rad waves,
Middletown,NJ        {     (908)957-5081    }       and a company sickday!"

 
 
 

race jibes aka laydown jibes

Post by Pat J. Pinche » Thu, 24 Dec 1992 03:19:10

Great description Felix!! Question for you and anyone else who takes
their 12 foot boards out in over 18 knots (David T. or Bill M., are you
listening?).....

The conditions I find it most difficult to crank out a really good "round-
the-mark" jibes are on the One-Design with the 7.4 in over 18 knots.  I'm
dialed in, in the back straps, on a beam or not-too-broad reach, i.e.
like on the reaching legs of the "M" course, the mast track is all the way
back at 14-15, maybe 13 if it's too choppy, and here comes the jibe mark.
I step out of the back strap, place my foot just in front of it on the
leeward side, lift up with my front foot (in the strap) to get that big
old nose to turn, sheet in my back hand, extend my forward hand, and crank
into the turn.  Things look good so far, but once I turn through the eye of
the wind and go to flip the sail and transition my feet, I find that the
combination of too much weight near the tail, the mast track all the way back,
and those 7foot+ booms on the 7.4 cause the board to whip around into the
wind and I lose my plane and have to bear off to get going on the new
course.  I've tried flipping the sail sooner, and usually get backwinded on
the new tack (if I'm able to catch the new side of the booms since I
released early).

This is kind of hard to describe unless you've tried to jibe a 12 foot
course board in planing conditions with the track all the way back.  If
you or anyone else has some suggestions, I'm all ears (not like Perot or
Martin Lawrence :-)

Thanks,
Pat                      'P19'    

only 3 more weeks 'til the Tudor/Mistral Finals!!  Gotta have these
jibes down by then!

 
 
 

race jibes aka laydown jibes

Post by felix.cabr » Thu, 24 Dec 1992 04:14:23


Quote:

>Great description Felix!! Question for you and anyone else who takes
>their 12 foot boards out in over 18 knots (David T. or Bill M., are you
>listening?).....

Thanks Pat, now I just have to hit a higher percentage of these jibes and I'll
be happy. It takes a lot of practise even after you think you know what to do.

Quote:
>The conditions I find it most difficult to crank out a really good "round-
>the-mark" jibes are on the One-Design with the 7.4 in over 18 knots.  I'm

I too have trouble with larger boards (ie 12') during high speed jibes.

Quote:
>the wind and go to flip the sail and transition my feet, I find that the
>combination of too much weight near the tail, the mast track all the way back,
>and those 7foot+ booms on the 7.4 cause the board to whip around into the
>wind and I lose my plane and have to bear off to get going on the new
>course.  I've tried flipping the sail sooner, and usually get backwinded on
>the new tack (if I'm able to catch the new side of the booms since I
>released early).

I find that if I rail the board to hard it turns much tighter and it will
loose speed through the turn. When I take long carving arcs I come out of the
turn faster. I think thats where the laydown comes into play. It allows you
to speed through the turn with little speed lose if any (and shorter arcs).

I've tried flattening the board earlier in the turn. This keeps me from turning
to far into the wind. This seems to work for me. I still can't cut the arc
shorter with these beasties. When I do, I lose all forward speed after
flipping the sail. Thats because I do what you do. I sink the tail too much
during the turn.

How about some pointers Mike (MJ1)?

--

AT&T Bell Labs       {  att!mtgzfs3!felixc  }       a rad board, rad waves,
Middletown,NJ        {     (908)957-5081    }       and a company sickday!"

 
 
 

race jibes aka laydown jibes

Post by Petzi Schwe » Thu, 24 Dec 1992 15:50:46


|> I learned this jibe in cabarete off wave faces. Its much easier to laydown
|> the sail when your angled on a wave face.
Fully agreeing to the rest of the article I feel a little bit worried 'bout this one. Doing a "lay down jibe" on a wave face (with a fine waveboard, I asume) is one thing, but pushing a nearly 10' long and 5" thick toilet door through a choppy-water-turn with as much speed as you can is another thing ...
I think (my personal ideas, no flames please) that's the main difference between wavesailing, where you have to commit (right term ?) to wind and waves, compared to sailing a slalomboard, where you challenge the conditions, trying to press your manouevers against wind and waves (and opponents too) ...
hi, Petzi
###################################################

MD-ADV, Municipality of the City of Vienna, Austria

 
 
 

race jibes aka laydown jibes

Post by Tom Alber » Thu, 24 Dec 1992 02:08:47

If you can get your hands on a Sept/Oct '92 Windsurfing magazine, there
is an instructional piece on the laydown jibe with pictures of Robby and
Bjorn doing the jibe.  

No better examples!