The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by sailquik (Roger Jacks » Mon, 10 Jan 2000 04:00:00


 First things first, I need to say thanks (bigtime) to Alan Bernau, the mid
Atlantic Starboard Rep. for the opportunity to test the latest lite air racing
design from Starboards.  This board was designed by both Jim Drake
(the designer of the original Windsurfer), and Svein Rasmussen , the
head man at  Starboard.
I previously had the opportunity to sail one of the Formula 155 prototypes last
July in Thailand courtesy of Starboard and Diesha Homanee, the local hero at
Jomtien Beach. We did not have the best of conditions for our test day,
(6-8 knots max) but I was very much impressed with  the performance of
the prototype in such light conditions.
So I was really interested to see if the production Formula 155 would perform
as well.
The wind didn't really cooperate around here, but late in the day it finally
came up to about 8-10 mph so I decided I would put a sail that I know
performs extremely well in "marginal" conditions on the Formula 155 and
see what happens.
I rigged the  Y2K 9.5 Sailworks Retro prototype as full as possible  and just
stuck it on the board and went out to see what it would do.
Here's the Wind Hotline readout for about 5 min. before I got on the water.
The WHL sensor is about 1 mile from my sailing site in a southerly direction, so
I think their reading pretty accurately reflects the windspeeds I was actually
getting.
                        Lo Av Hi        Curr  1Ago 2Ago 3Ago
Pt. Lookout       6   9   10 SE   9      5      5       3

I set off on the Formula, and almost immediately it seemed to want to get
planing. I was standing with one foot in front of the front footstrap and one
between the front and rear straps. As long as I stayed in this position on the
board it acted like it wanted to plane of but it didn't. So I put my front foot
in the footstrap and moved my weight a little more toward the rear of the board.
Whoa, the board just seemed to "slide out from under my front foot and up onto a

plane, effortlessly. So I got both feet in the straps and planed out for about
1.8 miles, jibed, and came back in, and jibed on the inside. I was planing about
3/4 of the way around the jibes in about 8-10 mph wind speed. Great stuff.
I planed back and forth for about 45 min. sometimes going upwind, sometimes way
off the wind. the Formula points really high in this windspeed, but since the
only fin available was a 54 cm Curtis Racing ( from a W-75 AVS board) I knew I
was not pointing nearly as high as the Formula will go with the normal 58 cm
fin. I had nothing to judge it against, but it seemed to be going much higher
than I've ever been able to get a board to go in only 10 mph windspeed.
After the 45 min. my hands were getting cold, so I decided to take a break.
warm up my hands, and get out the Garmin GPS unit I use for testing so I
could see how fast I was really going.
Before I went back out , I put on some DaKine Cold Water mitts to keep the
hands warm, and dowhauled the big Retro nearly to the max. I had been getting
a little backhanded earlier as this board points high enough to really generate
some stronger apparent wind.
The WHL Readings just before I went back out were:
              Lo Av Hi   Curr 1Ago 2Ago 3Ago
 Pt. Lookout   6  9 10 SE   9    9    5    5
So, I sailed for another 45 min, with warm hands this time. and the wind seemed
like it had filled in a little.
The Formula 155 and the big Retro were working really well together, and I was
able to sail the same 1-2 mile reach out into the Chesapeake Bay about 10 or 12
more times.
Somewhere in there the GPS managed to shut itself off, so I didn't get the whole

sesh recorded, but when I looked at the max speed, I was astonished.......
22.7 miles per hour in about 9-10 mph windspeed.
That's more than 2 X the windspeed, not something I'm accustomed to seeing in
winds this lite. Wow.
When I got back to the house, I started measuring things for this report.

The 9.5 Retro was rigged as follows:
Mast length: 536 cm
Boom length: 253 cm
Foot of sail to base pulley centerline: 7 cm.
The mast was a Sailworks XR-490 with  a Sailworks fixed base extension trimmed
down to 46 cm. Base cup was an Arrows AirBase stubby.
I measured the draft in the sail (without the boom, sail resting on the battens)
and the mast was 6" (15 cm) off the ground and the clew was a whopping 54 cm
(21.25 ") off the ground. And some people have the audacity to tell me camless
sails have no draft.
___________________________________________________________________
The board:
Starboard Formula 155 Production model.
Fin specs:
Span (length): 54.25 cm
Chord:
        Root: 11.5 cm
          Mid:   9.5 cm
          Tip:   7 cm
Model/ Mfg. Curtis Fin Co 54 Racing.

The board specs are:
Length:  280 cm.
Width:      85 cm (33 3/8")   Wow, that's wider than the GO!
Stern Width:  52 cm ( It's a diamond tail ).
Fin Placement: LEis 20 cm forward of the center juncture of the tail.
Center of Rear Footstraps from tail juncture: 25 cm  (I had the FS all the way
back.
Center of Front FS from the tail: 73 cm ( I had the front FS as far back and
outboard as  possible.
Note: The Formula  155 comes with both inboard and outboard footstrap plugs,
so those wanting to use a smaller fin will have a set of FS inserts already
installed for just that reason.
I was running the mast foot at 136 cm from the tail.
The range of the mast foot slot is 130 cm -150 cm.
The board is very easy to ride, jumping onto a plane the instant you step back
to get the rocker line up out of the water. As I said, the act of putting your
front foot in the strap seems to "slide" the board up onto a plane.
I did not pump at all today, and planed the whole time. I went deep and the
board slows slightly due to the diminished apparent wind, but keeps right on
planing. Without the big fin, I really couldn't put the Formula to the test for
upwind capability, but it seemred very good with the 54cm, which I found would
"let" loose every time I ran into a lull. This didn't stop the board from
planing, and as soon as I let up the sideways pressure on the fin it would hook
right back up. I was really pushing that little fin, and I have the muscle aches
to prove it. This is one of the things sailors new to the wide boards/big fins
need to get  accustomed to, you will need to develop some stronger muscles in
the feet, ankles and calves. These muscles will burn a little the first time or
two you sail something as wide as the Formula, but the muscles develop quickly.
I've noticed the same thing when sailing the Starboard W-75, with this same
fin.
If todays short session, with no real tuning, in very lite winds is any
indication, I suspect the threshold at which longboards always seem to win,
just got lowered a few knots.
Can't wait until I get a Formula 155 of my own and can begin training for the
Midwinters.
later
        Roger

\\\
sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Cert. WS Instructor (Lvl 1)
Sailworks/F2/Starboard/MPB/HPL/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine
Phones: So. MD (301)872-9459;  Avon, NC (252) 995-3204

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by sandri.. » Mon, 10 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Roger,
Great description of a board that sounds like it rips in 8-10 knots.
Let us know how it feels when you get a chance to sail it in other wind
speeds.

How does it compare to other wide styles you've sailed.  How does it
jibe?

Being a formula board, correct me if I'm wrong, it is intended to be
sailed as the one board registered for course racing, which is run in
up to 20 knots.

Thanks,
Steve

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by Bill » Mon, 10 Jan 2000 04:00:00

How does your wide board jibing differ
from higher wind technique?
Quote:

>  First things first, I need to say thanks (bigtime) to Alan Bernau, the mid
> Atlantic Starboard Rep. for the opportunity to test the latest lite air racing
> design from Starboards.  This board was designed by both Jim Drake
> (the designer of the original Windsurfer), and Svein Rasmussen , the
> head man at  Starboard.
> I previously had the opportunity to sail one of the Formula 155 prototypes last
> July in Thailand courtesy of Starboard and Diesha Homanee, the local hero at
> Jomtien Beach. We did not have the best of conditions for our test day,
> (6-8 knots max) but I was very much impressed with  the performance of
> the prototype in such light conditions.
> So I was really interested to see if the production Formula 155 would perform
> as well.
> The wind didn't really cooperate around here, but late in the day it finally
> came up to about 8-10 mph so I decided I would put a sail that I know
> performs extremely well in "marginal" conditions on the Formula 155 and
> see what happens.
> I rigged the  Y2K 9.5 Sailworks Retro prototype as full as possible  and just
> stuck it on the board and went out to see what it would do.
> Here's the Wind Hotline readout for about 5 min. before I got on the water.
> The WHL sensor is about 1 mile from my sailing site in a southerly direction, so
> I think their reading pretty accurately reflects the windspeeds I was actually
> getting.
>                         Lo Av Hi        Curr  1Ago 2Ago 3Ago
> Pt. Lookout       6   9   10 SE   9      5      5       3

> I set off on the Formula, and almost immediately it seemed to want to get
> planing. I was standing with one foot in front of the front footstrap and one
> between the front and rear straps. As long as I stayed in this position on the
> board it acted like it wanted to plane of but it didn't. So I put my front foot
> in the footstrap and moved my weight a little more toward the rear of the board.
> Whoa, the board just seemed to "slide out from under my front foot and up onto a

> plane, effortlessly. So I got both feet in the straps and planed out for about
> 1.8 miles, jibed, and came back in, and jibed on the inside. I was planing about
> 3/4 of the way around the jibes in about 8-10 mph wind speed. Great stuff.
> I planed back and forth for about 45 min. sometimes going upwind, sometimes way
> off the wind. the Formula points really high in this windspeed, but since the
> only fin available was a 54 cm Curtis Racing ( from a W-75 AVS board) I knew I
> was not pointing nearly as high as the Formula will go with the normal 58 cm
> fin. I had nothing to judge it against, but it seemed to be going much higher
> than I've ever been able to get a board to go in only 10 mph windspeed.
> After the 45 min. my hands were getting cold, so I decided to take a break.
> warm up my hands, and get out the Garmin GPS unit I use for testing so I
> could see how fast I was really going.
> Before I went back out , I put on some DaKine Cold Water mitts to keep the
> hands warm, and dowhauled the big Retro nearly to the max. I had been getting
> a little backhanded earlier as this board points high enough to really generate
> some stronger apparent wind.
> The WHL Readings just before I went back out were:
>               Lo Av Hi   Curr 1Ago 2Ago 3Ago
>  Pt. Lookout   6  9 10 SE   9    9    5    5
> So, I sailed for another 45 min, with warm hands this time. and the wind seemed
> like it had filled in a little.
> The Formula 155 and the big Retro were working really well together, and I was
> able to sail the same 1-2 mile reach out into the Chesapeake Bay about 10 or 12
> more times.
> Somewhere in there the GPS managed to shut itself off, so I didn't get the whole

> sesh recorded, but when I looked at the max speed, I was astonished.......
> 22.7 miles per hour in about 9-10 mph windspeed.
> That's more than 2 X the windspeed, not something I'm accustomed to seeing in
> winds this lite. Wow.
> When I got back to the house, I started measuring things for this report.

> The 9.5 Retro was rigged as follows:
> Mast length: 536 cm
> Boom length: 253 cm
> Foot of sail to base pulley centerline: 7 cm.
> The mast was a Sailworks XR-490 with  a Sailworks fixed base extension trimmed
> down to 46 cm. Base cup was an Arrows AirBase stubby.
> I measured the draft in the sail (without the boom, sail resting on the battens)
> and the mast was 6" (15 cm) off the ground and the clew was a whopping 54 cm
> (21.25 ") off the ground. And some people have the audacity to tell me camless
> sails have no draft.
> ___________________________________________________________________
> The board:
> Starboard Formula 155 Production model.
> Fin specs:
> Span (length): 54.25 cm
> Chord:
>         Root: 11.5 cm
>           Mid:   9.5 cm
>           Tip:   7 cm
> Model/ Mfg. Curtis Fin Co 54 Racing.

> The board specs are:
> Length:  280 cm.
> Width:      85 cm (33 3/8")   Wow, that's wider than the GO!
> Stern Width:  52 cm ( It's a diamond tail ).
> Fin Placement: LEis 20 cm forward of the center juncture of the tail.
> Center of Rear Footstraps from tail juncture: 25 cm  (I had the FS all the way
> back.
> Center of Front FS from the tail: 73 cm ( I had the front FS as far back and
> outboard as  possible.
> Note: The Formula  155 comes with both inboard and outboard footstrap plugs,
> so those wanting to use a smaller fin will have a set of FS inserts already
> installed for just that reason.
> I was running the mast foot at 136 cm from the tail.
> The range of the mast foot slot is 130 cm -150 cm.
> The board is very easy to ride, jumping onto a plane the instant you step back
> to get the rocker line up out of the water. As I said, the act of putting your
> front foot in the strap seems to "slide" the board up onto a plane.
> I did not pump at all today, and planed the whole time. I went deep and the
> board slows slightly due to the diminished apparent wind, but keeps right on
> planing. Without the big fin, I really couldn't put the Formula to the test for
> upwind capability, but it seemred very good with the 54cm, which I found would
> "let" loose every time I ran into a lull. This didn't stop the board from
> planing, and as soon as I let up the sideways pressure on the fin it would hook
> right back up. I was really pushing that little fin, and I have the muscle aches
> to prove it. This is one of the things sailors new to the wide boards/big fins
> need to get  accustomed to, you will need to develop some stronger muscles in
> the feet, ankles and calves. These muscles will burn a little the first time or
> two you sail something as wide as the Formula, but the muscles develop quickly.
> I've noticed the same thing when sailing the Starboard W-75, with this same
> fin.
> If todays short session, with no real tuning, in very lite winds is any
> indication, I suspect the threshold at which longboards always seem to win,
> just got lowered a few knots.
> Can't wait until I get a Formula 155 of my own and can begin training for the
> Midwinters.
> later
>         Roger

> \\\
> sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
> Cert. WS Instructor (Lvl 1)
> Sailworks/F2/Starboard/MPB/HPL/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine
> Phones: So. MD (301)872-9459;  Avon, NC (252) 995-3204


 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by sailquik (Roger Jacks » Mon, 10 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>How does your wide board jibing differ
>from higher wind technique?

Bill:
First a little correction to my wordy post on the Formula 155.
The length of the board is 270, not 280 as I said last nite.
If you couldn't tell, I'm really e***d about the Formula 155 and
seeing some  form  of Formula racing get started here in the US.
I tend to get wordy when e***d aobut something.

I will also weigh the board,  hopefully tomorrow, on a more accurate
scale than I have available here at home.

Now, back to your question, Bill.
I have found that the jibing techniqe on the new wider boards is similar to a
less contemporary narrower tail board, but one thing for sure, you can  carve a
jibe  on these wide tail boards in alot less wind.
If you make a fairly wide arc jibe, you can palne all the way in and out of your
jibe in 10-12 knots (notice the windspeeds in last nites post were in miles per
hour. Not my choice, but I wanted to be able to post the raw data from the WHL
sensor, and it comes in MPH)!

The largest difference I have found is pretty interesting, because it took years
for me to learn to really bend my knees and lean FORWARD and IN  over the inside
rail to get a good carve jibe on the older style boards that are both narrower
and  have less rocker in the bottom.
With the wide boards you still need to bend the knees some, and lean IN over
the rail you are carving on, but you do not need to lean FORWARD.
My analysis of this is that there are two aspects of board design that make
these wide boards plane so much earlier.
#1 They are wider, and the extra width allows the footstraps to be placed
farther off center, which allows the sailor to use and control a really large
span fin (i.e. 50-60 cm). Without the width, you couldn't handle that much fin,
which would compromise your upwind ability, and the ability to pump onto a plane
with a large fairly flat draft (up in the top anyway) race sail.

#2 In order to decrease the wetted surface (which is now maybe 50% wider) the
rocker line on these wide boards has been changed/refined to shorten the planing
"flat" significantly.
The reasons IMHO are:
Less wetted surface (fore/aft) to balance the additonal wetted surface generated
by the extreme width.
The shorter but wider planing flat allows the sailor far better control of the
boards tendency to "pitch" (change the fore/aft attack angle) as it goes over
chop and other water surface irregularities. So, the board does not change it's
angle of attack every time you go over a bit of chop, and since these boards
often have a cutawy or AVS type stern, there is no tendency for the board to
pitch "bow/nose down " when the chop gets way back near the rear of the board.
So the sailor can hold the board at the optimum (fastest) angle of attack more
of the time, and the board is not "pitching and bouncing ".

 There is more overall rocker in these boards, but all of it is pretty much
forward of the front footstraps. Take a straight edge and lay it on the bottom
of one of these boards. The area from the front FS back to the tail will be
pretty darn flat, but the overall area is much shorter.
So, somewhere in the bottom of the board, there is a fairly major "transition"
from rocker to flat.
Forward to this point the bottom of the board needs to be up off the water to
some degree. Behind this point the bottom of the board needs to be kept at the
optimum planing AOA to the extent possible.

When you go into a jibe on one of the wide boards, you need to hold the same AOA
that generated the terrific straight line speed, in order to plane all the way
around your carve jibe.
So, you no longer LEAN FORWARD going into your carve,
Why?? Becaae if you lean forward, you pitch the board forward (nose down)
which changes the most efficient angle of attack, and starts to drive the
"transition area" between the rocker and the planing flat into the water.
The effect of rolling the board foreward, dropping the nose, and driving the
rocker into the waters surface is like putting on the brakes.
Since you have much more control of the AOA, with the short wide planing flat,
you need to maintian that same AOA entering and exiting your jibes.
If you shift your weight too far forward, you stuff the rocker into the water
and the board slows like you hit the brakes.
So, in my experience, you need to lean into the jibe, just like a high wind
board, but DO NOT lean FORWARD as you would on the narrower boards (to set the
rail and keep it carving) becuase this will effectively cause a major loss of
speed, ending with the same result (stall part way thru your carve) as NOT
putting you weight forward on the narrower boards.
This leads me to a quick point about mast foot positioning on these boards.
If you try to position your mast foot the same way you would on narrow board,
you can easily get into a situation where the mast foot pressure is going onto
the board too far forward, driving the "rocker/flat" transition into the surface
of the water. This gives you a very rough, very slow ride. It also limits some
of your abilty to control the AOA of the board.
A couple of people have had problems recently here on this forum, and the
answer seemed to be to move the mast foot back which gets the front of the board

(the area all the way back to the rocker transition) up out of the water and
allows the board to skim or skip over the water with as little resistance (drag)
as possible.
Start with it way back near the rear of the track and gradually (1/4"at a time)
move the mast foot forward. You will soon find a "sweet spot"for that particular
rig, where the board is both very fast, and very easy to control. If you move
the mast foot forward of this point it will slow the board down. If you move it
much behind this point, the board may "tailwalk" and be hard to control.
Hope this helps.
Oh, yeah, it's a whole lot easier to practice (and perfect) your carve jibe is
nice flat water (10-15 knots) than at 15-20 when the water starts getting rough.
And, the same timing and technique that works at 10-15, will work farily much
the same at 15-20, you just need to deal with the bumps, but the shorter wider
boards make this alot easier also. Pitch control is what it's all about.
Later,
        Roger

sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Cert. WS Instructor (Lvl 1)
Sailworks/Starboard/F2/MPB/HPL/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine
Phones: So. MD (301)872-9459;  Avon, NC (252) 995-3204

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by Georg Soerense » Mon, 10 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>  First things first, I need to say thanks (bigtime) to Alan Bernau, the mid
> Atlantic Starboard Rep. for the opportunity to test the latest lite air racing
> design from Starboards.  This board was designed by both Jim Drake
> (the designer of the original Windsurfer), and Svein Rasmussen , the

...

You do sound e***d.  Now that you have sailed the 2 widest boards in the world -
The Formula and the GO, how would you compare them.  I own a GO and with a
9.5Neil Pryde -as soon as it starts planing it goes.  I need about 11knots of wind
(for my bulk) to get planing.  I live in a relatively light wind area and been
wondering
if I should sell my GO and go for a Formula to get a few more planing days.  How
much less wind speed do need to get it on a plane and does it handle much
differently
from the GO.
Georg Soerensen

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by Roger Jacks » Tue, 11 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Georg:

Quote:
> You do sound e***d.  Now that you have sailed the 2 widest boards in the world -
> The Formula and the GO, how would you compare them.  I own a GO and with a
> 9.5Neil Pryde -as soon as it starts planing it goes.  I need about 11 knots of wind
> (for my bulk) to get planing.

Which 9.5 do you sail. The VX/ZI/RX/V8 or the Supersonic/Diablo?
Hmmmm... 11 knots, lets see that's 12.5 mph.
OK, you can see from the windspeeds listed from the WHL, which are in
miles per hour
               Lo Av Hi    Curr 1Ago 2Ago 3Ago
 Pt. Lookout   6  9  10 SE   9    9    5    5
that the max. windspeed, when converted to knots is only 8.7 knots.
Here's the WHL readings converted to knots.
               Lo   Av   Hi      Curr 1Ago 2Ago  3Ago
 Pt. Lookout   5.2  7.8  8.7 SE   7.8  7.8  4.35 4.35

Here's a handy little "velocity converter" I made up.
MPH     Knots   Stat.MPH        Km/Hr   Meters/Sec
5       4.35    5.00            8.05    2.24
6       5.21    6.00            9.66    2.68
7       6.08    7.00            11.27   3.13
8       6.95    8.00            12.88   3.58
9       7.82    9.00            14.49   4.02
10      8.69    10.00           16.10   4.47
11      9.56    11.00           17.71   4.92
12      10.43   12.00           19.32   5.37
13      11.30   13.00           20.93   5.81
14      12.17   14.00           22.54   6.26
15      13.04   15.00           24.15   6.71

Quote:
> I live in a relatively light wind area and been wondering if I should sell
> my GO and go for a Formula to get a few more planing days.

I think you will see more planing days on the Formula, and it's going to
prove
quite a bit faster overall, as it's a race oriented design, carries more
fin,
and is both thinner and lighter than the GO. Do you have the Wood (Race)
GO,
or the EVA deck GO?  Your weight might be a factor, but 155 liters
should get you
going in all but the lightest (<8 knot winds).
Quote:
>  How much less wind speed do need to get it on a plane and does it handle much
> differently  from the GO.

I'm not sure I could have gotten the GO planing yesterday at all. If I
can I will
try this. It should make a great test. I only have an EVA GO to test
with.
With only one day on the board, there's no way I can give you a truly
objective
answer, but the Formula 155 is definitely faster, feels less "bulky",
and is easier to
jibe as the rail bevels extend from the nose all the way back to just
behind the front
footstraps. I think the bevels will serve to give the Formula a much
higher comfort zone.
I'll let you know after I get some more time on the Formula 155 next
weekend in Hatteras.
With the 58 cm fin, I may have to sail in the ocean to avoid the
sandbars and weeds. :-)
It is my intent to keep the group up to speed on my progress with this
board.
It seems more exciting to sail than the Techno, so if there's any way I
can generate interest
in Formula class racing here in the US, I would like to do it.
Some of the other board Mfg.'s are designing boards for this class in
Europe.
One board, 3 sails, unlimited fins should make for some really great
racing.
Later

        Roger

--
sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Cert. WS Instructor (Lvl 1)
Sailworks/Starboard/F2/MPB/HPL/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine
Phones: So. MD (301)872-9459;  Avon, NC (252) 995-3204

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by Georg Soerense » Tue, 11 Jan 2000 04:00:00

...
Roger,           thanks for your response.

Since you give a lot of reviews on a number of boards,sails and whatnot could
you not give us a little info about yourself. (In fact, I think it would be great if
everybody who gives an opinion about certain equipment to include a little info
about themselves. (I probably should have as well).
Well, I'm 6' tall and weigh 190lbs (210 after a massive Christmas feast but I should
be able to get down again in about a month).  I use a 9.5V8(1999) as my bread and
butter light wind sail rigged for max low power and have the EVA deck on my GO.
I sail mostly on the West coast (Vancouver) on the Ocean (a bay actually) and shallow
bottoms is not an issue (fin size).  I went to the gorge last summer and was quite
surprised to find (after several hours of practise) that I was able to sail (with a 4.4
and
a 5.0) in winds upto 30-35knots - but I discovered that I had to get a much smaller fin
on the board - I just couldn't handle it with such a large fin.

Your comments on the mast placement and the 'walking' of the board where quite
enlightening.  I have often found my board walking on it's tail and was informed by
some other sailors that it may have been due to too much lift created through the 54cm
curtis fin (usually at about 15knots). I hadn't given a lot of thought to the mast
placement
and usually have as far forward as possible. I have to say I really like my GO, when I'm
planing
I'm the fastest one on the bay (at least up to the point where I can't handle my 9.5
anymore
- its the only really good sail I have, all my others are ancient and don't carry the
proper
wind shape anymore.

Georg Soerensen

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by sandri.. » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> It seems more exciting to sail than the Techno, so if there's any way
I
> can generate interest
> in Formula class racing here in the US, I would like to do it.
> Some of the other board Mfg.'s are designing boards for this class in
> Europe.
> One board, 3 sails, unlimited fins should make for some really great
> racing.
> Later

>    Roger

> --
> sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
> Cert. WS Instructor (Lvl 1)
> Sailworks/Starboard/F2/MPB/HPL/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine
> Phones: So. MD (301)872-9459;  Avon, NC (252) 995-3204

Roger,
I think formula racing will be one of the best things to happen to the
sport.  The board design intent has the potential to be awsome for the
consumer (performance short boarding with a boards designed for 8-20
knots of wind--ideal for anyone who regularly sees marginal winds and
doesn't want to have to switch boards if it starts gusting to 20) as
well as spectators and sponsors as there will be a much higher chance
of there being enough wind for racing on a full plane any given day of
a competition.  Its also great for big guys who always felt
disadvantaged by one design racing.

Steve

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The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by sailquik (Roger Jacks » Wed, 12 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Roger,           thanks for your response.
Georg: No Problem!

>Since you give a lot of reviews on a number of boards,sails and what not could
>you not give us a little info about yourself. (In fact, I think it would be great if
>everybody who gives an opinion about certain equipment to include a little info
>about themselves. (I probably should have as well).

I'm 53 yrs. old, 5' 6" tall, and I weigh about 160 lbs. at the moment.
As I get older, it gets a little harder to get back down to 150 lbs. for the
summer racing season.
If you want to see who I am, there's a photo of me on Epinions.com. I seem to
have become one of their "windsurfing experts"
http://www.epinions.com/otdr/windsurfing
Also check out my opinions on all sorts of things having to do with windsurfing.

Quote:
>I sail mostly on the West coast (Vancouver) on the Ocean (a bay actually) and shallow
>bottoms is not an issue (fin size).  I went to the gorge last summer and was quite
>surprised to find (after several hours of practise) that I was able to sail (with a 4.4
>and a 5.0) in winds upto 30-35knots - but I discovered that I had to get a much smaller fin
>on the board - I just couldn't handle it with such a large fin.

I sail on the east coast, in the Cape Hatteras area mostly. I did a lite air
demo tour for many of the clubs here in the east, last summer, representing
(no sales, just gear for people to demo) Sailworks, F2, Starboard, Bic Techno.
I had so much fun meeting people and exposing them to the latest in really lite
air specific gear, that I'm going to do it again  this year.
The smallest sail (other than the 2.7 and 4.1 Sailworks Trainers) I've ever used
on the GO is a 6.2 North IQ3D in 22-28 knots with the 54 cm (the only Tuttle fin
we had. It worked pretty well and amazed me and well as a bunch of people on the
beach. They thought I was going to get hammered on a sail that big, and be
completely out of control on a fin that big. That was really neat because I just
ripped across the water, going completely over all the chop. One of the
smoothest rides I've ever had in that much wind. And, the Starboard Sonic
W-75 AVS board was even faster and smoother with the same sail and a slightly
different Curtis Racing 54 cm molded fin.
Quote:

>Your comments on the mast placement and the 'walking' of the board where quite
>enlightening.  I have often found my board walking on it's tail and was informed by
>some other sailors that it may have been due to too much lift created through the 54cm
>curtis fin (usually at about 15knots). I hadn't given a lot of thought to the mast
>placement and usually have as far forward as possible. I have to say I really like my GO, when I'm
>planing.

Hmmmmm......... Big problem! If you can, try putting the mast foot as far back
as it will go in the slot.  If the board tailwalks and gets hard to control,
move it forward about 1/4". If the board settles down, you may have found the
sweet spot of the way you have things rigged that day.  The less you move it
forward, the faster you have the potential to go. If the winds are lite, and
putting the mast foot way back causes your board to stall or be hard to get
planing, then move it forward.
Did you see the post I did on rockerline refinements on boards like the GO.
If not let me know and I will send you a copy.
Lots of people seem to be able to get boards to go fairly fast with the mast
foot forward, but I sure never can.

Quote:
>I'm the fastest one on the bay (at least up to the point where I can't handle my 9.5
>anymore- its the only really good sail I have, all my others are ancient and don't carry the
>proper wind shape anymore.

a 9.5 V8 is a fast and powerful sail, just right for a bigger guy like you.

Quote:

>Georg Soerensen

sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Cert. WS Instructor (Lvl 1)
Sailworks/Starboard/F2/MPB/HPL/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine
Phones: So. MD (301)872-9459;  Avon, NC (252) 995-3204
 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by Roger Jacks » Thu, 13 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Doug:
Quote:
> Klatoo! Barata! Nikto!

Hmmm... The Formula 155 seems to have "caught" your attention as well.

Quote:
>  Just checked out the Starboard page and saw this
> thing. Do images of flying saucers occur to anyone else?? 33" wide short
> boards have this effect.

It looks even better in real life, and significantly better still on the
water.

Quote:
> All kidding aside, I am quite interested in widestyle developments and
> am wondering: So this is their premier racing machine?

No, this is a board designed specifically for the new "Formula" racing
class.
It's big and getting bigger in Europe, and elsewhere in the world.
You "register" one board and 3 sails, (choose as many fins as you need)
and
compete against other (FW) Formula Windsurfing boards is 8-20 knot
windspeeds,
but I'd expect the event organizers to extend racing well up into the
20's,
(I haven't seen the international rules yet).
Quote:
> Are guys going up against those on Mike's Labs and whatever Bjorn is
>sailing, on this thing that is wider than the Hifly I took my first

lesson on?
If someone wants to register a Mike's Labs 8 knot wonder board for the
Formula
series, they can do so, but they will need to sail the same hull in 20
knots or
more.

Quote:
> I can understand that wider will generally plane earlier, but I am equally, or
> more interested in range. Is it really possible to have a smooth ride at
> 20mph winds in 2-3 foot chop, on a 33" wide board?

I haven't encountered the 2-3 foot chop yet, but I was out briefly the
other
evening on a 6.5 rigged for 20+ and the Formula 155 handled 1-2 foot
chop
with ease. Unfortunately the windspeed was going down as I was rigging
up
(a common occurrence in the Mid-Atlantic area) so I got to sail for 1/2
an hour
underpowered in 10-16 knots. Water was still pretty rough though. When
the wind
got up around 13-14, the Formula took off, and for some of the gusts,
was moving
pretty well. Control in the chop was very easy. The 155 just goes over
most of it
like an AVS or CAT board.

Quote:
> How do you think it compares with, say, the Protech RaceCat or Zajicek Z27, or others you'd
> put in a similar category?

I've been trying to get a sail on a Z27 all year, have sailed a 309
Protech CAT a little in the
past.
Since I don't have either one to do a head to head test, I'm not going
to speculate, but the
Formula 155 is sure alot lighter and easier to sail that the big 309
CAT.

Quote:
> You've got my interest. Bottom end planing, range, and lively performance sound great!

They are great! I hope to be able to give you more performance
impressions over/after the
weekend. I know where there's a Z27, Hmmmmmmm... wonder if I can borrow
it for a while.

Quote:
> One more thing. Know you don't like cams, but I'd be interested in you
> repeating that extreme upwind ability on something like an Aerotech vmg
> 9.6 if you have the opportunity (if Sailworks doesn't mind), just so we
> get an idea of the board's upwind limit (that is, its ability to extend
> that limit).

This will be difficult to achieve in Hatteras, as fin size is a function
of water depth.
Hatteras is not a terrific place for big fins, but I will see what I can
do.
As of this moment, I don't have the 58 cm Curtis that's supposed to ship
with the board.
but I will be glad to do an upwind test as soon as the fin gets here.
I will be sailing (conditions permitting) the Formula with the following
sails over the
next couple of weeks.
2000 Sailworks Retro 9.5/8.5/7.5
1999 Sailworks X-T 8.5
2000 Windwing Synthesis 9.0/8.3
2000 Tushingham 8.4 Raptor/7.4 Heckler
Plates kinda full, but do you have a big VMG you'd like to add to the
mix?
Quote:

> Thanks for the great post. You always contribute a lot here.

Thanks! In this case I'm trying to get something going (FW Racing), and
let
you all know about the new board.

Quote:
> Looking forward to "Day 2".

Day 1 1/2 (should have been Day 2) was sort of a bust because the
Chesapeake wind gods
were playing their games again and I admit to rigging about 2 meters to
small for the
conditions when I got out on the water, about right for what they were
when I started rigging.
Later,
        Roger

P.S.
You wouldn't be bringing your big VMG's to the Midwinters, would you.
I've got some big Y2K Retro's that would be glad to show you where the
upwind mark
is located. Longboards, AVS boards, or Formula boards, your choice, but
the conditions may
have some bearing on the choice of weapons.

--
sailquik (Roger Jackson) US 7011
Cert. WS Instructor (Lvl 1)
Sailworks/Starboard/F2/MPB/HPL/Chinook/Kokatat/DaKine
Phones: So. MD (301)872-9459;  Avon, NC (252) 995-3204

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by doug_a_mar.. » Fri, 14 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Klatoo! Barata! Nikto!  Just checked out the Starboard page and saw this
thing. Do images of flying saucers occur to anyone else?? 33" wide short
boards have this effect.

All kidding aside, I am quite interested in widestyle developments and
am wondering: So this is their premier racing machine? Are guys going up
against those on Mike's Labs and whatever Bjorn is sailing, on this
thing that is wider than the Hifly I took my first lesson on? I can
understand that wider will generally plane earlier, but I am equally, or
more interested in range. Is it really possible to have a smooth ride at
20mph winds in 2-3 foot chop, on a 33" wide board? How do you think it
compares with, say, the Protech RaceCat or Zajicek Z27, or others you'd
put in a similar category? You've got my interest. Bottom end planing,
range, and lively performance sound great!

One more thing. Know you don't like cams, but I'd be interested in you
repeating that extreme upwind ability on something like an Aerotech vmg
9.6 if you have the opportunity (if Sailworks doesn't mind), just so we
get an idea of the board's upwind limit (that is, its ability to extend
that limit).

Thanks for the great post. You always contribute a lot here. Looking
forward to "Day 2".

Doug

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Before you buy.

 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by CMason28 » Fri, 14 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Klatoo! Barata! Nikto!

Yes, but what was the positronic man's
name, the day the earth stood still.
Great movie. If only we had followed their
warning better.
The movie was example of forward thinking, as is Starboard's Formula board!
Not intended to compete in world cup,
with 12lb carbon boards, but is competitive
in local regattas, while also being durable
enough to teach beginners on!
Now thats a good idea!
Starboard has some of the best thinking in
the sport today.
Aloha,
Chuck
 
 
 

The new Starboard Formula 155 Day 1

Post by doug_a_mar.. » Fri, 14 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> >Klatoo! Barata! Nikto!
> Yes, but what was the positronic man's
> name, the day the earth stood still.
> Great movie.

That was Gort. He ripped like none other!

Quote:
> Not intended to compete in world cup,
> with 12lb carbon boards, but is competitive
> in local regattas, while also being durable
> enough to teach beginners on!
> Now thats a good idea!
> Starboard has some of the best thinking in
> the sport today.

I get it. More like the Techno class racing that sprang up last year,
or so.

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Before you buy.