Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by marc rose » Sat, 02 Apr 2005 22:03:56


  The United States Windsurfing Association (US Windsurfing)announced
today that the term "port" will become the direction of right of way
for all of its Nationally sanctioned races "because it's easier to yell
"PORT" instead of "starboard" " declared Nat Siddall, Executive
Director of US Windsurfing.  He denied that there was any involvement
from Mistral or Neil Pryde in making this decision. "For years we have
been deluged with letters and emails from racers who want faster
warnings and quicker response times on the course.  Two syllable
warnings take twice as long to announce and perceive so we are going
with the shorter term."
   Defenders of retaining the "starboard" term maintain that certain
board manufacturers resent the "free advertising" that Starboard is
getting from sailors in their casual- or e***d- references to that
right hand forward direction.  KISS, or Keep It Starboard-Stupid,
alledges that even Neil Pryde- the company that will be making the new
Olympic board-is feeling the effects when naive sailors yell
"starboard" on the approach of their new race board.
    Siddall, despite sailing a Mistral, maintains that the
organization's decision is influenced by our modern society and its
instant messaging mentality.  He cites tests on the water that
demostrate that a sailor can tack off in 33% of the time when they hear
"port" as compared to hearing "starboard".  Siddall continues" if it
takes only one third of the time to react to "port" and you can see
that it takes half as long to say "port", then it is obvious that right
of way on a race course can be maintained in less time than you can say
"Do a 720.""
    Many proponents of the change to port rule are former British
sailors who welcome this left hand prominance to their sailing sport.
American sailors who have been testing this switch are comfortable with
its ease of use and think that it will go beyond the race course and
help define right of way issues in all sailing venues.  Siddall agrees,
and is looking into other single syllable solutions to make windsurfing
more user friendly.
 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by Alan » Sun, 03 Apr 2005 00:39:37

Happy April Fools, Marc!

Alan

--
Windsurfing Club: http://SportToday.org/


Quote:
>   The United States Windsurfing Association (US Windsurfing)announced
> today that the term "port" will become the direction of right of way
> for all of its Nationally sanctioned races "because it's easier to yell
> "PORT" instead of "starboard" " declared Nat Siddall, Executive
> Director of US Windsurfing.  He denied that there was any involvement
> from Mistral or Neil Pryde in making this decision. "For years we have
> been deluged with letters and emails from racers who want faster
> warnings and quicker response times on the course.  Two syllable
> warnings take twice as long to announce and perceive so we are going
> with the shorter term."
>    Defenders of retaining the "starboard" term maintain that certain
> board manufacturers resent the "free advertising" that Starboard is
> getting from sailors in their casual- or e***d- references to that
> right hand forward direction.  KISS, or Keep It Starboard-Stupid,
> alledges that even Neil Pryde- the company that will be making the new
> Olympic board-is feeling the effects when naive sailors yell
> "starboard" on the approach of their new race board.
>     Siddall, despite sailing a Mistral, maintains that the
> organization's decision is influenced by our modern society and its
> instant messaging mentality.  He cites tests on the water that
> demostrate that a sailor can tack off in 33% of the time when they hear
> "port" as compared to hearing "starboard".  Siddall continues" if it
> takes only one third of the time to react to "port" and you can see
> that it takes half as long to say "port", then it is obvious that right
> of way on a race course can be maintained in less time than you can say
> "Do a 720.""
>     Many proponents of the change to port rule are former British
> sailors who welcome this left hand prominance to their sailing sport.
> American sailors who have been testing this switch are comfortable with
> its ease of use and think that it will go beyond the race course and
> help define right of way issues in all sailing venues.  Siddall agrees,
> and is looking into other single syllable solutions to make windsurfing
> more user friendly.


 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by turt » Sun, 03 Apr 2005 02:11:42

Alan you could have let it go a little further before busting
it......some of the typo's in "the press release" are dead give aways
though

lol

On Fri, 01 Apr 2005 15:39:37 GMT, "Alan"

Quote:

>Happy April Fools, Marc!

>Alan

>--
>Windsurfing Club: http://SportToday.org/



>>   The United States Windsurfing Association (US Windsurfing)announced
>> today that the term "port" will become the direction of right of way
>> for all of its Nationally sanctioned races "because it's easier to yell
>> "PORT" instead of "starboard" " declared Nat Siddall, Executive
>> Director of US Windsurfing.  He denied that there was any involvement
>> from Mistral or Neil Pryde in making this decision. "For years we have
>> been deluged with letters and emails from racers who want faster
>> warnings and quicker response times on the course.  Two syllable
>> warnings take twice as long to announce and perceive so we are going
>> with the shorter term."
>>    Defenders of retaining the "starboard" term maintain that certain
>> board manufacturers resent the "free advertising" that Starboard is
>> getting from sailors in their casual- or e***d- references to that
>> right hand forward direction.  KISS, or Keep It Starboard-Stupid,
>> alledges that even Neil Pryde- the company that will be making the new
>> Olympic board-is feeling the effects when naive sailors yell
>> "starboard" on the approach of their new race board.
>>     Siddall, despite sailing a Mistral, maintains that the
>> organization's decision is influenced by our modern society and its
>> instant messaging mentality.  He cites tests on the water that
>> demostrate that a sailor can tack off in 33% of the time when they hear
>> "port" as compared to hearing "starboard".  Siddall continues" if it
>> takes only one third of the time to react to "port" and you can see
>> that it takes half as long to say "port", then it is obvious that right
>> of way on a race course can be maintained in less time than you can say
>> "Do a 720.""
>>     Many proponents of the change to port rule are former British
>> sailors who welcome this left hand prominance to their sailing sport.
>> American sailors who have been testing this switch are comfortable with
>> its ease of use and think that it will go beyond the race course and
>> help define right of way issues in all sailing venues.  Siddall agrees,
>> and is looking into other single syllable solutions to make windsurfing
>> more user friendly.


 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by Dan Weis » Sun, 03 Apr 2005 09:00:57

Yes, no joke.  We at US Windsurfing are following the lead of US Sailing.
At tomorrow's US Sailing spring meeting, US Windsurfing will host an hour
long symposium on the efficiency of hailing "Port!" rather than the
multisylabic "Starboard!  Starboard! Hey!  Starboard".  The lower sonic
frequency of the sound "port!" carry farther in the wind and take less time
to say and process.

US Sailing carried on a two-year study only to see determinative data
leaving no room for any other conclusion, though to its surprise, this
hailing technique works best in the northern hemisphere.  Study data suggest
this phenomenon relates to the Corrialis Effect, in a way similar to the
variable swishing of toilet water in each hemisphere.

-Dan

Quote:
> Alan you could have let it go a little further before busting
> it......some of the typo's in "the press release" are dead give aways
> though

> lol

> On Fri, 01 Apr 2005 15:39:37 GMT, "Alan"

>>Happy April Fools, Marc!

>>Alan

>>--
>>Windsurfing Club: http://SportToday.org/



>>>   The United States Windsurfing Association (US Windsurfing)announced
>>> today that the term "port" will become the direction of right of way
>>> for all of its Nationally sanctioned races "because it's easier to yell
>>> "PORT" instead of "starboard" " declared Nat Siddall, Executive
>>> Director of US Windsurfing.  He denied that there was any involvement
>>> from Mistral or Neil Pryde in making this decision. "For years we have
>>> been deluged with letters and emails from racers who want faster
>>> warnings and quicker response times on the course.  Two syllable
>>> warnings take twice as long to announce and perceive so we are going
>>> with the shorter term."
>>>    Defenders of retaining the "starboard" term maintain that certain
>>> board manufacturers resent the "free advertising" that Starboard is
>>> getting from sailors in their casual- or e***d- references to that
>>> right hand forward direction.  KISS, or Keep It Starboard-Stupid,
>>> alledges that even Neil Pryde- the company that will be making the new
>>> Olympic board-is feeling the effects when naive sailors yell
>>> "starboard" on the approach of their new race board.
>>>     Siddall, despite sailing a Mistral, maintains that the
>>> organization's decision is influenced by our modern society and its
>>> instant messaging mentality.  He cites tests on the water that
>>> demostrate that a sailor can tack off in 33% of the time when they hear
>>> "port" as compared to hearing "starboard".  Siddall continues" if it
>>> takes only one third of the time to react to "port" and you can see
>>> that it takes half as long to say "port", then it is obvious that right
>>> of way on a race course can be maintained in less time than you can say
>>> "Do a 720.""
>>>     Many proponents of the change to port rule are former British
>>> sailors who welcome this left hand prominance to their sailing sport.
>>> American sailors who have been testing this switch are comfortable with
>>> its ease of use and think that it will go beyond the race course and
>>> help define right of way issues in all sailing venues.  Siddall agrees,
>>> and is looking into other single syllable solutions to make windsurfing
>>> more user friendly.

 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by Elle » Sun, 03 Apr 2005 10:26:55

could we make that "Coriolis" the next time around? Just for the
purists, of course.
 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by Dan Weis » Mon, 04 Apr 2005 22:16:20

Yes, well, spelling has never been my fortay.

-Dan

Quote:
> could we make that "Coriolis" the next time around? Just for the
> purists, of course.

 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by morefor.. » Tue, 05 Apr 2005 12:35:29

Seems to me that we could get all these positive effects just by
switching the meanings -Henceforth, I'll yell "port" when on starboard
tack and vica verca!
 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by Alan » Tue, 05 Apr 2005 23:09:20

Too much ' Corona' effect.

Alan
--
Windsurfing Club: http://www.ibscc.org


Quote:
> Yes, well, spelling has never been my fortay.

> -Dan


> > could we make that "Coriolis" the next time around? Just for the
> > purists, of course.

 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by marc rose » Wed, 06 Apr 2005 01:39:40

Quote:

> Too much ' Corona' effect.

> Alan
> --
> Windsurfing Club: http://www.ibscc.org

Alan,
Is that Toyota Corona or Smith Corona?
                                      Marc(who owned a Corolla)

By the way, the Gear Demo in Baltimore was cold and windy.  I got
plastered on my 5.3 but I was smiling all the while)

 
 
 

Press Release: US Windsurfing Switch Hits

Post by Alan » Wed, 06 Apr 2005 03:06:35


Quote:
> By the way, the Gear Demo in Baltimore was cold and windy.  I got
> plastered on my 5.3 but I was smiling all the while)

As long as it was only the wind that plastered ya...

We had a 4.5 Saturday down here. I missed Sunday, but I'm sure it was good.
Let's hope this low system was part of a pattern.

Regards,
Alan