Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by mcjy » Sun, 18 Feb 2001 20:49:18


Hi everyone,

I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

I could however not find it in the posts of the last two months so
I'll give it a try anyway...

I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
than storing them wet.

The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
prevent certain algae to develop.

Any comments on this?

...gosh, I just whish this story was true ;-)

Greetingz,
MJ

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by Just A » Sun, 18 Feb 2001 21:05:47

I've certainly never cleaned or dried any of my windsurfin kit and it
doesn't seem to have done it any harm... I've had some sails for over 8
years now and they are still in fairly good condition.... Mind you I've also
broken plenty of sails whilst sailing by going head first through them,
sticking fins/spreader bars through them etc etc.... I think they are more
likely to get broken/damaged on the water than through not washing and
drying them... Plus it gives you more time oin the water if you don't have
to pfaff around cleaning kit.

Al.
--
Alan Cole

http://www.forcesofnature.fsnet.co.uk [extreme sports in West Wales]

Quote:

> Organization: EuroNet Internet
> Newsgroups: rec.windsurfing
> Date: Sat, 17 Feb 2001 11:49:18 GMT
> Subject: Need to dry sails when used in salt water

> Hi everyone,

> I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
> have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

> I could however not find it in the posts of the last two months so
> I'll give it a try anyway...

> I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
> you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
> avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
> sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
> than storing them wet.

> The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
> prevent certain algae to develop.

> Any comments on this?

> ...gosh, I just whish this story was true ;-)

> Greetingz,
> MJ


 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by (Pete Cresswell » Sun, 18 Feb 2001 22:14:22

RE/

Quote:
>I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
>you do not need to dry your sails

Nobody ever told me anything, I'm just lazy...but...

- I had a set of Windsurfing Hawaii RAFs that lasted eight years and I think at
least one of them never did get dry.

- My Windwing convertables are going on three years old and a couple of them
definately have never been dry...with no apparent problems

- Having built a wooden boat, I know that where rainwater collects rot develops.
Where there's salt water it's protected against rot.
-----------------------
Pete Cresswell

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by Glenn Woode » Sun, 18 Feb 2001 22:54:27


Quote:

>Hi everyone,

>I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
>have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

You are completely right.

Quote:
>I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
>you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
>avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
>sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
>than storing them wet.

You are completely right.

Quote:
>The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
>prevent certain algae to develop.

You are completely right.

Quote:
>Any comments on this?

You are completely right about all of these points. Just sail and enjoy. When
the gear gets so feeble that I can't even get it wet, I'm switching hobbies, or
maybe just hoarding the late 90's gear so I'll have enough to last me.

Glenn

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by Phil » Sun, 18 Feb 2001 23:13:22

It's a good idea to "air" dry the sails (out of the sun) before rolling them
but no need to rinse.  Pretty well known in sailing circles that salt water
prevents mold and mildew to a large extent.

Phil


Quote:
> Hi everyone,

> I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
> have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

> I could however not find it in the posts of the last two months so
> I'll give it a try anyway...

> I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
> you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
> avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
> sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
> than storing them wet.

> The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
> prevent certain algae to develop.

> Any comments on this?

> ...gosh, I just whish this story was true ;-)

> Greetingz,
> MJ

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by j.. » Sun, 18 Feb 2001 23:22:54

Absolutely, don't bother to rinse your sails after a salty sesh.  I think the
exposure to UV while you dry them, not to mention the flapping in the breeze
which sometimes can't be helped, does loads of harm.  I think the only time
I'll rinse anything off my sails is either when they are caked with sand, or
with the gooky dark red sea weed we get here on First Beach.  A sail bag full
of fermenting sea weed in the back of the van can practically knock you out
when you first open the doors on a hot day.  But most of the time I just roll
'em up and don't worry about it, and the sails last fine.  I even saw an old
North Orbital (vintage '89) with my sail numbers on it last summer, and it
still looked to be in top shape.


writes:

Quote:
>Hi everyone,

>I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
>have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

>I could however not find it in the posts of the last two months so
>I'll give it a try anyway...

>I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
>you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
>avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
>sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
>than storing them wet.

>The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
>prevent certain algae to develop.

>Any comments on this?

>....gosh, I just whish this story was true ;-)

>Greetingz,
>MJ

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Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by Roger Jacks » Mon, 19 Feb 2001 05:41:32

Hello mcjybe,

Quote:
> I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
> have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

Yes, it's been discussed, but without Deja.com so you can search
the archives, it would be hard to find.

Quote:
> I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
> you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
> avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
> sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
> than storing them wet.

Since your sail are totally made of synthetic (plastic or neoprene
***)
there is no need to dry them or rinse them as long as you can roll the
sail
up mostly free from sand. If you rig/derig on grass, there's no need to
rinse them at all when sailed in salt or fresh (sweet) water. I most
often
derig my sails IN the water (both salt and fresh) to keep the sand away
from them.
Yes, they sometimes take a long time to dry, way down inside the roll
(head of
the sail) but I have never had odors, rot, or any other kind of
degradation
either cosmetic or structural.
The can't rot, or mildew etc. because they are plastic which doesn't
absorb
moisture.

Quote:
> The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
> prevent certain algae to develop.

No "algae" will develop in fresh water either.
You might want to "wash" your sails periodically to get any residue
(from water pollutants, minerals, alkali, etc.) off your sails, but
this is purely a cosmetic thing.
UV damage (from the sun) when sails are laying out "drying" will be far
more damaging than anything they pick up in the water.
I've heard it said that for every hour your sails lay horizontally on
the beach or out "drying" you reduce it's life span by at least one day.
Sailmakers are using more UV resistant materials, but they are
expensive,
and the operative word here is "resistant". The UV rays from the sun
will
still degrade and ultimately destroy monofilm materials, scrim monofilm,
polyester fabrics. In other words the whole sail.
This is why I cover my sails with a UV proof car cover when they are
laying
out.
Drying them is totally unnecessary, and will shorten their life rather
than
adding to it.
Regards, Roger
 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by Pawel Kostula » Mon, 19 Feb 2001 07:36:27

In the very humid climate the salt that stays on not rinsed sail causes the sail
to never dry- it seems that salt left on the sail draws the moisture from the
air.  Sail feels dirty but maybe  there is no harm.  I was told that if you
can't dry your sail salt water will do no harm but fresh water will cause
mildew.
I prefer to rinse my sails and hang them in the garage, this way they are clean
and dry.
I also rinse boards (call me paranoid), it makes me feel better, I think salt
can't be good for the straps screws.
Quote:

> It's a good idea to "air" dry the sails (out of the sun) before rolling them
> but no need to rinse.  Pretty well known in sailing circles that salt water
> prevents mold and mildew to a large extent.

> Phil



> > Hi everyone,

> > I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
> > have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

> > I could however not find it in the posts of the last two months so
> > I'll give it a try anyway...

> > I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
> > you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
> > avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
> > sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
> > than storing them wet.

> > The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
> > prevent certain algae to develop.

> > Any comments on this?

> > ...gosh, I just whish this story was true ;-)

> > Greetingz,
> > MJ

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by Roger Jacks » Mon, 19 Feb 2001 08:52:10

Hi Pawel,
If you use the non-magnetic austenitic Stainless Steel screws that come
with most footstraps and on most boards, salt water has no effect on
them
at all. They are inert, and impervious to attack by salt water, fresh
water,
most strong acids. That's why they use piping made of the same kind of
stainless steel in chemical processing plants.
The inserts they***into are hard plastic, also unaffected by
sal***er.
The whole board is some form of plastic or composite, so it's completely
impervious as well.
Yes, perhaps you are being a bit paranoid, but if it suits you, and
keeps
your gear looking good, go for it.
Regards, Roger
Quote:

> In the very humid climate the salt that stays on not rinsed sail causes the sail
> to never dry- it seems that salt left on the sail draws the moisture from the
> air.  Sail feels dirty but maybe  there is no harm.  I was told that if you
> can't dry your sail salt water will do no harm but fresh water will cause
> mildew.
> I prefer to rinse my sails and hang them in the garage, this way they are clean
> and dry.
> I also rinse boards (call me paranoid), it makes me feel better, I think salt
> can't be good for the straps screws.


> > It's a good idea to "air" dry the sails (out of the sun) before rolling them
> > but no need to rinse.  Pretty well known in sailing circles that salt water
> > prevents mold and mildew to a large extent.

> > Phil



> > > Hi everyone,

> > > I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
> > > have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

> > > I could however not find it in the posts of the last two months so
> > > I'll give it a try anyway...

> > > I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
> > > you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
> > > avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
> > > sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
> > > than storing them wet.

> > > The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
> > > prevent certain algae to develop.

> > > Any comments on this?

> > > ...gosh, I just whish this story was true ;-)

> > > Greetingz,
> > > MJ

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by (Pete Cresswell » Mon, 19 Feb 2001 09:51:46

RE/

Quote:
>most strong acids. That's why they use piping made of the same kind of
>stainless steel in chemical processing plants.
>The inserts they***into are hard plastic, also unaffected by
>sal***er.
>The whole board is some form of plastic or composite, so it's completely
>impervious as well.
>Yes, perhaps you are being a bit paranoid, but if it suits you, and
>keeps
>your gear looking good, go for it.

Something I noticed in Hawaii: most people tended to rinse everything
solid.....guys standing under the shower with booms, boards, whole surf skis
even...

Could just be availability of public showers and local custom...I'm thinking it
might be something to do with Pacific water - it's definately saltier than the
water off New Jersey...and my new mast base rusted after a few weeks of
non-rinsed use there - although I'm currently blaming the steel they used...
-----------------------
Pete Cresswell

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by charlesive » Mon, 19 Feb 2001 12:43:14

I promised not to republish my Ten Ways to Put Away Sails - Wet or Dry"
article so as not to diminish the value to collectors who had the wisdom to
have the article encased in plexiglass for posterity's sake.  :)

CI

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by Gary Woo » Wed, 21 Feb 2001 05:29:26

I think that'd be the aluminum parts, Pete.  Salt does wreak havoc with aluminum...
Quote:

> Something I noticed in Hawaii: most people tended to rinse everything
> solid.....guys standing under the shower with booms, boards, whole surf skis
> even...

> Could just be availability of public showers and local custom...I'm thinking it
> might be something to do with Pacific water - it's definately saltier than the
> water off New Jersey...and my new mast base rusted after a few weeks of
> non-rinsed use there - although I'm currently blaming the steel they used...
> -----------------------
> Pete Cresswell

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by (Pete Cresswell » Wed, 21 Feb 2001 10:56:39

RE/

Quote:
>I think that'd be the aluminum parts, Pete.  Salt does wreak havoc with aluminum...

I'd guess electrolysis is a big factor.   Certainly the couple of Hobie cats
(moored, not beached or trailered...)   I had when living in Hawaii long ago had
periodic failures where the shrouds were pop-riveted to the aluminium side
rails.     I recently had a similar failure on the footpedals of my surf ski -
again, steel pop rivets into aluminium.
-----------------------
Pete Cresswell
 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by shin » Thu, 22 Feb 2001 02:46:10

Yes, no need to rinse salt water -- however, salt water conditions are
synonymous with sand and coquina.  A rolled up, sandy sail going in and
out of the truck, time and time again before it is sailed certainly could
cause some abrasion.  For this reason, I wash my sails with fresh water
when I get home and dry in the garage.  Plus, fresh water will dry fast --
salt water, in a humid location may be constantly damp.  Sand is the
enemy.

Shine

Quote:

> Hi everyone,

> I'm a bit afraid that I am asking a question on a topic that might
> have been discussed extensively in this newsgroup before...

> I could however not find it in the posts of the last two months so
> I'll give it a try anyway...

> I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
> you do not need to dry your sails everytime you pack your gear to
> avoid to get 'the weather' in you sail. Even more so that rinsing your
> sail with sweet water and dry it in the sun might even do more damage
> than storing them wet.

> The theory behind all this was that the salt in the water would
> prevent certain algae to develop.

> Any comments on this?

> ...gosh, I just whish this story was true ;-)

> Greetingz,
> MJ

 
 
 

Need to dry sails when used in salt water

Post by B. K. Brownin » Thu, 22 Feb 2001 12:10:50

Quote:

> RE/
> >I was told not too long ago that when you have surfed in salt water,
> >you do not need to dry your sails

> Nobody ever told me anything, I'm just lazy...but...

> - I had a set of Windsurfing Hawaii RAFs that lasted eight years and I think at
> least one of them never did get dry.

> - My Windwing convertables are going on three years old and a couple of them
> definately have never been dry...with no apparent problems

> - Having built a wooden boat, I know that where rainwater collects rot develops.
> Where there's salt water it's protected against rot.
> -----------------------
> Pete Cresswell

You are right on many accounts.  There have been llllooonnnnggggg
threads on the issue of to dry or not to dry sails.  The rule I have
lived by is: dry any sail that has been in or wet by fresh water
(including rain or dew).  Drying in the shade is MUCH prefered to drying
in the sun where UV light will attack the sail.  Any sail that has been
wet by salt water does not need to be dried.  If you try to roll out a
sail in the garage that still has salt on it - it will not dry anyway.
The salt appears to attract moisture out of the air as fast as the
moisture evaporates.