ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Paulin » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 02:06:27


Quote:

>> Girly moments

> Hey, that one's mine!  It's actually about ways we've changed since becoming climbers.

> Dawn

I happen to think it's a nice topic of discussion, potentially. Of
course, we don't have a Ladies' Room here...

Before I took up climbing I would dream about it and in those dreams I
was fearless, invincible and immortal. When I started actually climbing
it made me realize just how frightened, awkward and pathetic I can
really be.

Path to self-knowledge, price of self-knowledge.
Live a dream, crush a dream.

Blah blah blah...
Paulina

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Dawn Alguar » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 02:19:11

Quote:

> Before I took up climbing I would dream about it and in those dreams I
> was fearless, invincible and immortal. When I started actually climbing
> it made me realize just how frightened, awkward and pathetic I can
> really be.

That's me too.  I used to think I was so brave and had so much
fortitude.  Turns out I'm a coward and a wimp.

Dawn

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Greg » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 02:40:07

Quote:
> That's me too.  I used to think I was so brave and had so much
> fortitude.  Turns out I'm a coward and a wimp.

Ditto. I found out that I was just a legend in my own mind. However,
having dispelled all delusions of grandeur, I'm free to enjoy what I can
do. Now I just need to figure out what to do with those RURPs and
***y-tiny heads. I'm thinking wind chimes.

Climbing seems to be a voyage of self-discovery for many people. I think
this is because it allows you to have frequent simulated near-death
experiences with only the occasional real near-death experience.
Introspection seems to be a natural result of these experiences.

-G

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Mark Cat » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 03:01:18


Quote:

>> Before I took up climbing I would dream about it and in those dreams I
>> was fearless, invincible and immortal. When I started actually climbing
>> it made me realize just how frightened, awkward and pathetic I can
>> really be.

> That's me too.  I used to think I was so brave and had so much fortitude.
> Turns out I'm a coward and a wimp.

> Dawn

I always laugh when people find out I'm a climber and assume I'm tough.  As
far as climbers go, I feel pretty soft.  When leading, I'm the antithesis
of bold.

One big change for me is losing my fear of heights over the years.
Climbing and a couple years as a chimney sweep really did a number on it.
I remember getting nervous half-way up a 50' climb my first time out.  It
took a while to get comfortable on a top-rope.  When I first started
setting top-ropes, I'd sometimes slither like a snake to rig over the edge.
I may never be bold, but I'm certainly pleased that I don't have that same
level of fear I used to.

mark
_____________________
Mark Cato

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Scott Grime » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 04:21:29

I remember when Dawn first came to this little group of on-line climbers, so
full of energy and enthusiasm, evidence of this energy can be found at her
website or what used to be her website.

By her own words she has describe herself as a wimp among other self
deprecating terms.  I say bullshit to this and to any other climber who
views themselves in a lesser light.

Climbing is a journey into the unknown it's grasp on us will change from
year to year.  Be not dismayed at what you haven't done or thought you
should have done.  Instead be thrilled at the concept that you/we are
climbers, engaged not in a sport but a lifestyle, with a set of very strict
rules and consequences that can be very profound.
--
Cheers,

SMG

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Paulin » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 05:01:35

Quote:

> I remember when Dawn first came to this little group of on-line climbers, so
> full of energy and enthusiasm, evidence of this energy can be found at her
> website or what used to be her website.

> By her own words she has describe herself as a wimp among other self
> deprecating terms.  I say bullshit to this and to any other climber who
> views themselves in a lesser light.

> Climbing is a journey into the unknown it's grasp on us will change from
> year to year.  Be not dismayed at what you haven't done or thought you
> should have done.  Instead be thrilled at the concept that you/we are
> climbers, engaged not in a sport but a lifestyle, with a set of very strict
> rules and consequences that can be very profound.

I hear what you're saying. And I'll still take the dubious pleasure of
being smacked in the face with my personal limits over a good day at work.

I was just thinking of the reality of getting out and climbing (versus
reading/dreaming/spraying about it) and how it "changed" me. And my
understanding of me.

Me, me, me
Paulina

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by greg mushi » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 05:10:08

On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:21:29 -0400, "Scott Grimes"

<snip>

Quote:
>Climbing is a journey into the unknown it's grasp on us will change from
>year to year.  Be not dismayed at what you haven't done or thought you
>should have done.  Instead be thrilled at the concept that you/we are
>climbers, engaged not in a sport but a lifestyle, with a set of very strict
>rules and consequences that can be very profound.
>--
>Cheers,

>SMG

Got into climbing in the late '60's - thought it could be used to
overcome (what at that time felt like) a fear of heights. Came to
understand that that fear was simply the base of the brain generating
"stay alive" chemicals (so well labeled as: the inner chicken). But
came to the conclusion that (trad) climbing was the ultimate mirror...
in day to day life one could harbor grand illusions of who/what one
was...  but on the Apron, 40' above the last bolt on 5.9 nothings (ya,
I know, 5.9 is nothing today), or 2500' off the deck on A4 pins, one
could find out what one was really made of... and more importantly,
one could craft the person one "wanted" to be. Almost 4 decades later,
still find it the ultimate truth/reality check. Also found the there
is a profound inner quiet that can be found under said conditions -
after the overwhelming fear... comes the quiet. The zen of leading.

greg

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Liebgot » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 05:16:28

I've had a few laughable conversations w/ co-workers when it comes up that I
climb. One person asked if I climbed El Cap? I said, yes I did a while
back... they looked at me and then said, "Don't you have to be strong to do
that?"

Not really.

:-)

Jason

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by meliss » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 05:10:17


Quote:
>That's me too.  I used to think I was so brave and had so much
>fortitude.  Turns out I'm a coward and a wimp.

It just depends whether your comparing yourself to Lynn Hill or the girls at the
mall having an Orange Julius while their nails dry.

You probably would have thought that your current climbing self was a huge stud
and inspiration back when you started to climb.  I bet you felt like a million
bucks the first time you touched the anchors at the gym or lead over a piece of
gear.  Now those things don't necessarily register in your mind as acts of
bravery.  You've learned to expect things from yourself, and you have so many
tough standards for comparison that you didn't have when you were a
beginner...including your own performance when you are at you peak...that's the
hardest comparison to come up short against, IMO.

I often get in the mindset of thinking I'm a gumby/wimp/coward, and in the
moment that I've gotten myself into and compared to my parnters, I usually am.
I know that the old me would be psyched at the ways in which the new me has
grown.  There are climbs that I do when I feel like a wimperig gumby every inch
of the way, but I know that I wouldn't have been able to touch them a few years
ago.  There are more subtle things too, like your pant-wiping story, that I
would have been too big of a wimp to handle easily back then.  Heck, these days
I don't even wait for the pee splash to dry on my feet before I get back in my
sleeping bag when it's cold...whereas before I'd hold it till morning if I
could.  It's not 5.13, but it's something!  I'm still a bigger wimp than someone
else, but to my mom or my lab mates, for example, I'm as bad ass as Evil Knevil.

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Dawn Alguar » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 05:49:24

Quote:

> You probably would have thought that your current climbing self was a huge stud
> and inspiration back when you started to climb.

No, I had a pretty good opinion of myself untested.  I thought I was the
sort who'd resist the Nazis, pull the kid out of the burning building,
dive into the frozen river to save strangers, go back into the storm to
rescue my hypothermic partner, etc.  Turns out the approach to the
Rainbow Wall is too hard and scary, 10 pitches is more than I want to
climb most days, and the thought of falling a few feet can paralyze me
because I might get a boo-boo.  I've accepted the fact that I'm a coward
and a wimp but it took climbing to teach me that.

Dawn

 
 
 

ways we've changed (was: actual quote... and Girlie moments on rc.com)

Post by Mike Garriso » Sun, 25 Jul 2004 06:32:02

Quote:

> I've accepted the fact that I'm a coward
> and a wimp but it took climbing to teach me that.

You prefer to be an old climber rather than a bold climber?