Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Post by Steve Reis » Wed, 31 Jul 1991 03:26:14


After more investigation it was found that one (not several) route was
chopped at City of Rocks (uncertainty created by rumor that bolt chopper
had a "hit list".  The chopped route was named "By Permit Only" on
Lower Breadloaves, put up by a local rap bolter this spring.

The Wilderness Society, and the Idaho Conservation League have joined in
a lawsuit against the National Park Service for "failing to protect a
resource".  This action has attracted the attention of the state
governor's office in Boise and the regional NPS office in Seattle.

The NPS is considering an indefinite ban of all bolt related activity
(putting up routes or chopping) until this issue is resolved.  According
to my source, an NPS ranger, the impact of these events could ripple
throughout the NPS causing repercussions elsewhere ( like all the other
legal issues getting this sport into the limelight in a very negative
way).

Steve

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Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Post by jim moo » Sat, 03 Aug 1991 14:10:41

Quote:

>After more investigation it was found that one (not several) route was
>chopped at City of Rocks (uncertainty created by rumor that bolt chopper
>had a "hit list".  The chopped route was named "By Permit Only" on
>Lower Breadloaves, put up by a local rap bolter this spring.

>The Wilderness Society, and the Idaho Conservation League have joined in
>a lawsuit against the National Park Service for "failing to protect a
>resource".  This action has attracted the attention of the state
>governor's office in Boise and the regional NPS office in Seattle.

>The NPS is considering an indefinite ban of all bolt related activity
>(putting up routes or chopping) until this issue is resolved.  According
>to my source, an NPS ranger, the impact of these events could ripple
>throughout the NPS causing repercussions elsewhere ( like all the other
>legal issues getting this sport into the limelight in a very negative
>way).

>Steve

Yessir.. all that great publicity over bolt wars is doing wonders
for access. Strange how 90% or more of those bolt routes are
amenable to top roping.

The more you request assistance from officialdom in resolving
'ethical disputes', the less freedom you will have.

Are you a new, hot, ambitious young gun? Like to keep your options open?
Try keeping bolts as your absolute last option.
Somebody chop your gear? Try hiking a few miles further, and then
keep your 'achievement' out of the public forum.

The need for recognition is a curse. Try being a true outcast, and
consider your climbs as a totally antisocial and self gratifying endeavor.
Revel in anonymity.

Jim

 
 
 

Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Post by jim bowe » Sun, 04 Aug 1991 00:32:47


Quote:


>(Steve Reiser) writes:

>>After more investigation it was found that one (not several) route was
>>chopped at City of Rocks (uncertainty created by rumor that bolt chopper
>>had a "hit list".  The chopped route was named "By Permit Only" on
>>Lower Breadloaves, put up by a local rap bolter this spring.

>>The Wilderness Society, and the Idaho Conservation League have joined in
>>a lawsuit against the National Park Service for "failing to protect a
>>resource".  This action has attracted the attention of the state
>>governor's office in Boise and the regional NPS office in Seattle.

>>The NPS is considering an indefinite ban of all bolt related activity
>>(putting up routes or chopping) until this issue is resolved.  According
>>to my source, an NPS ranger, the impact of these events could ripple
>>throughout the NPS causing repercussions elsewhere ( like all the other
>>legal issues getting this sport into the limelight in a very negative
>>way).

>>Steve

>Yessir.. all that great publicity over bolt wars is doing wonders
>for access. Strange how 90% or more of those bolt routes are
>amenable to top roping.

>The more you request assistance from officialdom in resolving
>'ethical disputes', the less freedom you will have.

>Are you a new, hot, ambitious young gun? Like to keep your options open?
>Try keeping bolts as your absolute last option.
>Somebody chop your gear? Try hiking a few miles further, and then
>keep your 'achievement' out of the public forum.

>The need for recognition is a curse. Try being a true outcast, and
>consider your climbs as a totally antisocial and self gratifying endeavor.
>Revel in anonymity.

Well, I think the issue here is one of outsiders trying to impose their
values on locals.  Frankly this is perhaps the greatest sin that mankind
has ever invented and dates back to the crusades when the good christians
set out to impose their values on the heathen muslems.

Every climbing area is different.  To think otherwise is narrow minded
and niave.  Some climbing areas lend themselves to bolted sport climbs
(just about every limestone area) where others are just fine to rely on
natural pro (the gunks).  Granite areas are in the grey area (no pun).
Yes there is natural pro but there is also large regions where there is
no pro but good climbs none the less.  The locals are in the best
position to put up routes and dictate the style of FFA's.  When all
the locals are in agreement about stlye and validity of new routes
then that says something and outsiders need to accept that.

                         Jim Bowers

 
 
 

Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Post by wayne trzy » Sun, 04 Aug 1991 01:39:46

Quote:

>Yessir.. all that great publicity over bolt wars is doing wonders
>for access. Strange how 90% or more of those bolt routes are
>amenable to top roping.

>The more you request assistance from officialdom in resolving
>'ethical disputes', the less freedom you will have.

>Are you a new, hot, ambitious young gun? Like to keep your options open?
>Try keeping bolts as your absolute last option.
>Somebody chop your gear? Try hiking a few miles further, and then
>keep your 'achievement' out of the public forum.

>The need for recognition is a curse. Try being a true outcast, and
>consider your climbs as a totally antisocial and self gratifying endeavor.
>Revel in anonymity.

Yes, Jim, you're touching on the essence of the problem here.

Maybe if guide-book authors start listing first top rope ascentionist's
names for routes, it will lend more credibility to top-roping as a claim
to fame.

But in all fairness, there is also a motive of creativity involved.
Putting up a route is a creative act which might be done for its own
creative sake, rather than for the sake of fame.

So is the building of a log cabin.  The public, however, cannot afford
to tolerate an indivual's use or consuption of public natural resources
for his own creative ends.  If I were to go into a national forest
and erect a cabin, the general public would frown on this to say the
least.  Why should modifying natural rock features be any different?

I'd like to believe that bolting could be held to a reasonable level
without regulations, but I'm more cinical than that.  I don't think
four-wheeling, logging, or fishing can be kept within reasonable
bounds without regulations either.

I hate regulations.  So I guess I'm just screwed anyway you look at it.
But regulations are preferable to the destruction of the rock.

-Wayne Tryzna

 
 
 

Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Post by wayne trzy » Sun, 04 Aug 1991 05:58:24

Quote:

>Well, I think the issue here is one of outsiders trying to impose their
>values on locals.

Right.  Lets give it all back to the indians, and my notions of how things
should be will be fulfilled.  (Except that the indians culture has been pretty
well corrupted by us, probably beyond recovery.)  Let's at least let the
indians decide where the bolts should go.

-Wayne Trzyna

 
 
 

Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Post by Ray Sne » Wed, 07 Aug 1991 04:05:09

Quote:
jim moore writes:
> Steve Reiser writes:

        < Steve describes bolt-chopping at the City of Rocks, and
          provides some details about how various organizations,
          including the NPS, are reacting to the situation ...    >

Quote:
> Yessir.. all that great publicity over bolt wars is doing wonders for
> access. Strange how 90% or more of those bolt routes are amenable to
> top roping.

> The more you request assistance from officialdom in resolving 'ethical
> disputes', the less freedom you will have.

For good or ill, 'officialdom' has seized control of these issues, with or
without any request on your part. And in my opinion, the Friends of the City
of Rocks might be considered to be a model for successful negotiations with
such officials. Our own little effort, the Colorado Climbers Coalition, was
far less successful...

BTW, "90% or more" is a remarkable assertion. You have obviously never been
to the City, where routes are often one long pitch that ends nowhere near the
top of the crag.

Quote:
> Are you a new, hot, ambitious young gun? Like to keep your options open?
> Try keeping bolts as your absolute last option. Somebody chop your gear?
> Try hiking a few miles further, and then keep your 'achievement' out of
> the public forum.

> The need for recognition is a curse. Try being a true outcast, and
> consider your climbs as a totally antisocial and self gratifying endeavor.
> Revel in anonymity.

Finally some interesting suggestions. People are doing exactly this.

        Ray Snead
        Boulder, Colorado

 
 
 

Lawsuit over Bolt Chopping

Post by Steve Reis » Thu, 08 Aug 1991 00:32:07

Quote:
>(jim moore) says:

[My original post deleted]

Quote:
>>Yessir.. all that great publicity over bolt wars is doing wonders
>>for access. Strange how 90% or more of those bolt routes are
>>amenable to top roping.

Wrong! We're talking about a lawsuit at City of Rocks where you have to
climb many of the rocks to even get on top of them.  Also, routes are
one to six pitches depending on where you climb.

Quote:
>>The more you request assistance from officialdom in resolving
>>'ethical disputes', the less freedom you will have.

Climbers do not request assitance from "officialdom".  It is imposed
upon us and we have formed a climbing organization to derive a consensus
which is presented to the NPS as to how to handle climbing issues.

Quote:
>>Are you a new, hot, ambitious young gun?

Pushing 40 and have been climbing a long time.  Not too ambitious. Love
climbing as should be obvious by the plthora of posts I've put in here
when I'm not climbing.

Like to keep your options open?

Absolutely, but with some restrictions derived from a consensus to
restrict the environmental impact of climbing to a level that is
mutually agreed upon in public meetings between the NPS and a climber's
organization which represents the consensus of a questionnaire sent to
thousands of climbers and not just the individuals in attendance.

Quote:
>>Try keeping bolts as your absolute last option.

Personally, I've never put up a bolted route, but do climb those put up
by friends. The consensus we've worked out was to ban further
development of certain rocks and to ban bolting near crack which could
accept safe protection (i.e. - bolting allowed next to rotten flaring cracks).

Quote:
>>Somebody chop your gear?

No, a friends on a route the NPS decided to allow.  Chopping circumvents
the channels of negotiation we are attempting to establish here and ALL
local bolters are involved in the climbers coalition to work with the
NPS on a balanced policy.  The current policy is moderate and favors
neither traditionalists nor the route manufacturers who would chip hold
or glue them  on to make artificial routes.

Quote:
>>Try hiking a few miles further, and then
>>keep your 'achievement' out of the public forum.

Jim, I'm not a route establisher, just president of Friends of City of
Rocks.  I'm just trying to make it clear as to how important it is that
climbers work together, no matter how extreme our positions. From
experience, it seems that about 98% of climbers want to work together.
The other 2% represent the extreme opposite fringes of environmental
traditionalists and the radical new artificial route fabricator to turn
the place into a construction zone.  Unfortunately, it seems the extreme
fringes practice their own form of terrorism.  Blatantly mocking the
effort of the other 98% to work for years with the NPS to develop a policy.

Quote:
>>The need for recognition is a curse.

What need? There is no innate need for anyone to strive for recognition.
Only those who want their egos fed with attention from others perceive
this as a need.  Also, if you are referring to those who put in the
bolts, most of them are low key guys around 40 years old who just want
to be left alona nad enjoy climbing for it's own sake.  They don't care
whether anyone knows what routes they put up.

Quote:
>>Try being a true outcast, and
>>consider your climbs as a totally antisocial and self gratifying endeavor.
>>Revel in anonymity.

While this does not apply to me since I don't put up routes, I can say
that several bolters have gone elsewhere in S.E. Idaho and developed
many new areas in anonymity, but then when climbers here about there
areas, they are soon innundated as well.

Steve

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