I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Ghi » Mon, 03 Oct 1994 01:34:01


Hi-

I've put together a very detailed beta for the Nose on El Cap a week after
climbing it in mid-September 1994.  It is currently in a simple ".TXT"
format on my PC.  Is there a way to upload this file to rec.climbing
through America On Line?  i can't seem to figure out how to do this.

Should I put this document on a sunsite?  If so, how do I do that?

Thanks!

A very confused climber trying to give back some info to the very generous
newsgroup.

Scott Ghiz

PS - A huge thanks goes out to everyone who answered my questions and
responded to my posts.  You guys really helped more than you can know.
Now I'm just trying to give somethig back to the climbing community.
Thanks again!!

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by MarkF397 » Mon, 03 Oct 1994 14:12:04

No, you cannot upload the file to this newsgroup on AOL - things are not
that advanced here.

However, I would love a copy of the file. You can send it to me here at
AOL.

MarkF39703

Thanks,

Mark

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by <U34.. » Mon, 03 Oct 1994 18:22:26

I wanted to field some opinions on the best manner to build strength and
endurance.  All climbers crave  both of these attributes, but we all know
there is a fine line between working for strength and overworking our
muscles and tendons.  For example, many climbers want to add weekly gym
workouts to their routine, but find it difficult to balance this with their
need and desire to climb.  If you work out hard, you are going to neeed 48
hours to rest.  Working out twice a week would severly limit the frequency
with which you could climb.  I think it would beneficial to everyone if
people shared their knowledge and philosphies on training.  Consistent,
programatic training for strength, endurance, and technique is without
question to key to improving your climbing ability.  What are the best methods
to achieve this "programatic" balance?

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Ghi » Tue, 04 Oct 1994 06:16:11


Quote:
(MarkF39703) writes:
>No, you cannot upload the file to this newsgroup on AOL - things are not
>that advanced here.
>However, I would love a copy of the file. You can send it to me here at
>AOL.

You got it!

Helium Man

PS - If there is anyone on AOL who wants this beta, I'll be glad to send

If there is anyone out there on compuserve....I put the file in the "Snow
Sports/Climb" Library under the name "NOSE09.TXT".

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Anthony R Bu » Tue, 04 Oct 1994 07:24:10

|> I think it would beneficial to everyone if
|> people shared their knowledge and philosphies on training.  Consistent,
|> programatic training for strength, endurance, and technique is without
|> question to key to improving your climbing ability.  What are the best methods
|> to achieve this "programatic" balance?

Well, I start everyday by making the strong effort to sincerely get out of bed.
This is far more strenuous than you might imagine, as I've already over-exerted
by doing 10 sets of 20 repititions on the 'snooze' button of my alarm clock.

Next, I get a pump going by lifting all of the butter and sugar I put on my toast
in the morning.  When I get tierd of this, and can't lift another slice, I move
on to doughnuts, which have lightening hole in the center, to reduce the weight.
After that, I move to doughnut holes.

Walking 300 yards to class is a fine aerobic workout, capped off by 1/2 flight
of stairs to the doorway of the M.E. bldg.  Once there, I go to the lounge and
lift some more doughnuts, to restore my energy level after the long and
steep approach.

A few hours of reading news groups trains my eye-hand coordination, trying to
look at the screen and hit the 'N' key at the same time.   When I flame people,
I get a real workout, typing words.

After a day of sitting in class, I do my aerobic workout in reverse, and add a
step to it.  I pick up a case of beer at the liquer store and get an additional
endurance workout, trying to carry it home.  Once home, I spend the evening
alternating between struggling with the caps and trying to lift the beer to my
mouth.  I get a real pinch-strength increase when I work on trying to open
all those bags of Fritos I eat when the munchies hit.  I DON'T just sit there
though, I get out of the chair to pee, use the phone, and answer the door when
the Domino's delivery boy arrives.

After geting the real stomach work-out of belly-ing all of that, it's on for a
midnight workout of unprotected sex and dimethyl-amphetimine abuse!

|> If you work out hard, you are going to neeed 48 hour of rest.

You BET you are!!!

-T.

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by K2 - maybe next lifetime. » Tue, 04 Oct 1994 21:14:43

Quote:

>Helium Man

>PS - If there is anyone on AOL who wants this beta, I'll be glad to send

>If there is anyone out there on compuserve....I put the file in the "Snow
>Sports/Climb" Library under the name "NOSE09.TXT".

can someone get it from AOL and then upload it unto
rec.climbing? that'll be cool, thanks.

--------------------<<<<<>>>>>--------------------
               Alvin Kienming Liau

    "sometimes a scream is better than a thesis"
                     -Emerson
--------------------<<<<<>>>>>--------------------

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Michael Meinhar » Wed, 05 Oct 1994 00:57:41

Quote:

> I wanted to field some opinions on the best manner to build strength and
> endurance.

Climb, climb, climb.  Eat.  Sleep.  Repeat.

Mike M.

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Bob Harringt » Wed, 05 Oct 1994 06:40:55

Quote:

> I wanted to field some opinions on the best manner to build strength and
> endurance.  All climbers crave  both of these attributes, but we all know
> there is a fine line between working for strength and overworking our
> muscles and tendons.  For example, many climbers want to add weekly gym
> workouts to their routine, but find it difficult to balance this with their
> need and desire to climb.  If you work out hard, you are going to neeed 48
> hours to rest.  Working out twice a week would severly limit the frequency
> with which you could climb.  I think it would beneficial to everyone if
> people shared their knowledge and philosphies on training.  Consistent,
> programatic training for strength, endurance, and technique is without
> question to key to improving your climbing ability.  What are the best methods
> to achieve this "programatic" balance?

Maybe we should preface the discussion with: "what are the attributes of a
successful training program?"  Many of the articles and books written about
training are aimed at high end competition climbers (or those aspiring to be),
and I find that the advice given doesn't always apply to my recreation oriented
climbing.  It's interesting to know what the top comp climbers consider to be the
ideal training program, and certainly some of the things that they do to
improve will also help the rest of us improve, but most of us are juggling work,
family, school, and other interests, so it becomes a question how does on optimize
one's training given a limited amount of time and energy -- how do you improve
your climbing given a one-on-thir***-off climbing schedule?

So, besides improving/maintaining one's climbing, I'd say, a good training
program:

-- Prevents injuries.  Weight lifting seems to do this for me.

-- Is interesting enough that you can maintain it in the face of flagging
   motivation.  A dedicated partner helps.

-- Is flexible enough that you can fit it into a tight schedule.

-- Can include kids, spouse, SO, etc.  Kids love climbing gyms.

Bob Harrington

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Robn » Wed, 05 Oct 1994 22:35:02


Quote:
(Bob Harrington) writes:
> -- Prevents injuries.  Weight lifting seems to do this for me.

Yeah, same thing with first-joint weighted deadhangs on a fingerboard.
This stresses your forearm muscles and associated connective tissues in a
very controlled manner, and does wonders for injury-prevention. Similarly,
super-steep bouldering on positive (wooden) holds allows extreme
climbing-specific power training with little risk of injury.

Quote:
> -- Is interesting enough that you can maintain it in the face of
flagging
>   motivation...

For me the cure is to stop climbing altogether while I'm training. When
there is no temptation to climb, it's much easier to stick to a
well-structured training program. Dale Goddard claims that training is not
an end in itself, but that's the wrong attitude to take -- it's much
easier to train effectively if you consider it to be worthy of your full
dedication.

rob

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Bob Harringt » Thu, 06 Oct 1994 03:50:37



Quote:
:(Bob Harrington) writes:

:
:> -- Prevents injuries.  Weight lifting seems to do this for me.
:
:Yeah, same thing with first-joint weighted deadhangs on a fingerboard.
:This stresses your forearm muscles and associated connective tissues in a
:very controlled manner, and does wonders for injury-prevention. Similarly,
:super-steep bouldering on positive (wooden) holds allows extreme
:climbing-specific power training with little risk of injury.

I like finger boards too.  I think they do a good job of isolating
your fingers -- obviously you work your fingers out bouldering,
but you are also concentrating on technique and using other muscles,
whereas you can use a finger board to purely work fingers.

:> -- Is interesting enough that you can maintain it in the face of
:> flagging  motivation...
:
:For me the cure is to stop climbing altogether while I'm training. When
:there is no temptation to climb, it's much easier to stick to a
:well-structured training program. Dale Goddard claims that training is not
:an end in itself, but that's the wrong attitude to take -- it's much
:easier to train effectively if you consider it to be worthy of your full
:dedication.

You may be right that you can train more productively when you aren't
distracted by climbing, but I'm more motivated to train hard if I have a
project that I'm training for and will be soon attempting.  So I go for
more of a steady mixture of training and climbing that I can maintain
indefinitely, rather than the cyclic type thing recommended by top
end climbers.  It's probably true that cyclic training produces higher
peaks in performance, but I just don't have the schedule flexibility
and predictability to map out a twelve week training campaign in advance.

I'd be afraid that at the end of the cycle it would turn out that I
didn't have any time to climb!  Now, that would be frustrating...

Bob

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Dag Johansen Es » Tue, 04 Oct 1994 16:23:29

: Hi-

: I've put together a very detailed beta for the Nose on El Cap a week after
: climbing it in mid-September 1994.  It is currently in a simple ".TXT"
: format on my PC.  Is there a way to upload this file to rec.climbing
: through America On Line?  i can't seem to figure out how to do this.

Uh . . . . why don't you just post it . . . just like you posted
this message?

 
 
 

I have detailed beta for the "Nose" on El Cap..but...

Post by Michael Meynhard van Scho » Fri, 07 Oct 1994 20:54:05


Quote:

>> I wanted to field some opinions on the best manner to build strength and
>> endurance.
>Climb, climb, climb.  Eat.  Sleep.  Repeat.
>Mike M.

Don't eat. It's better for the power to weight ratio:-)

P.S.
It's incredible. Your name is Michael Meinhardt?
My name is Mike Meijnhard. It's the first time in my life that
I read/heard about someone with a similar name.

Mike