'You know you're old when' revisited

'You know you're old when' revisited

Post by Marc Whitn » Sun, 08 Nov 1992 05:15:00



Quote:

>--

>My husband and I started rock climbing last fall, and are
>now avid climbers, and continuing to improve technically all
>the time (very satisfying).  Here's my question.  We're both
>40 years old (darn, all those years we could have been climbing
>but didn't know) and are wondering how aging affects
>climbing abilities.  I assume strength and balance diminish
>sometime along the way, and that one might have to be satisfied
>with lower-difficulty climbs.  Are there any 50, 60, or 70 year
>old climbers out there?  How many years climbing do we have left?

Well I'm "only" 44, but a friend who turned 50 several years ago is
not only active but regularly climbs in the 5.11+ range.  He may be
up to 5.12 by now.  Just keep light, keep in shape and keep at it!

Quote:

>Another side question, how many folks out there climb with
>their spouses?

I don't do this but from what I've seen of others the results are
spotty at best.  At least one divorce I know of resulted.  If you
can manage without competing or one of expecting too much from the
other that's OK.  Your age may be in your favor as maturity should
mitigate some of the clashes.
 
 
 

'You know you're old when' revisited

Post by Ilana Ste » Sun, 08 Nov 1992 05:52:20

Quote:


> >Another side question, how many folks out there climb with
> >their spouses?

> I don't do this but from what I've seen of others the results are
> spotty at best.  At least one divorce I know of resulted.  If you
> can manage without competing or one of expecting too much from the
> other that's OK.  Your age may be in your favor as maturity should
> mitigate some of the clashes.

I agree with Marc that the big problem with climbing with one's spouse
is competition and expectation, and that maturity (emotional, not
chronological) helps.  I am fairly immature and competitive (well, it's
true!) and had a difficult time climbing with Britt until (1) I improved
to within a few grades of his ability, and (2) I started leading and thus
could feel I was taking, if not equal responsibility, at least some
of the responsibility of the climb.

When he was leading 5.10d and I was barely following 5.7 we would get
into a lot of bad feelings while climbing, mostly because I felt
depressed and discouraged, and didn't like being told what to do all the
time.  He had knee surgery last winter, while I joined a rock gym with a
(female) friend of similar ability to mine -- by the beginning of the
climbing season, I was leading (gym) 5.10a and psyched to start leading
real climbs.  Now, even though he can still climb harder routes than I
can, and he leads the harder pitches, I feel much more self-assured,
and am able to take his criticism of my climbing (such as badly placed
pro) a little better.

Now, my husband is my favorite climbing partner!

--
/\     There may be honor among thieves, but there's none among politicians.

      \______________________________________________________________________

 
 
 

'You know you're old when' revisited

Post by wayne trzy » Sun, 08 Nov 1992 10:13:44

Quote:

>...had a difficult time climbing with Britt until (1) I improved
>to within a few grades of his ability, and (2) I started leading and thus
>could feel I was taking, if not equal responsibility, at least some
>of the responsibility of the climb.

I had the opposite experience with my wife.  When she started leading, I
had a hard time dealing with the risk (to her) emotionally.  This is
not a sexist thing either.  I had another good friend who expressed
the same feelings toward climbing with his brother.  My wife severely
broke her foot in a leader fall and lost most of her interest in climbing
as a result, so it is a moot point.  I'm glad I wasn't climbing with
her when it happened.

Watch out for ledges.

--

-Wayne Trzyna


 
 
 

'You know you're old when' revisited

Post by Marc Whitn » Sun, 08 Nov 1992 09:22:20


Quote:

>I agree with Marc that the big problem with climbing with one's spouse
>is competition and expectation, and that maturity (emotional, not
>chronological) helps.  I am fairly immature and competitive (well, it's
>true!) and had a difficult time climbing with Britt until (1) I improved
>to within a few grades of his ability, and (2) I started leading and thus
>could feel I was taking, if not equal responsibility, at least some
>of the responsibility of the climb.

One example of a mismatched couple involved a case where one was
***ed to offwidth and squeeze chimneys while the other person was
quite normal.  I guess that's what happens when you marry a ***!
:-)  Said *** is now associated with a like-minded SO so that
half of the situation sorted itself out.  I've occasionally
fantisized about what a personals / lonely-heart add by a climber
would look like:  "5'8" NS F/M seeks opposite.  Must lead 5.11,
follow 5.10 (OW freaks need not apply)."