Follow Up to "Product Info - Skyshark 3P Spars"

Follow Up to "Product Info - Skyshark 3P Spars"

Post by Bert Tana » Fri, 27 May 1994 02:34:15


Subj:   Follow-up (was Product info - Skyshark 3P spars)

I put 3P frames in my Rev II and Skyburner Pro Dancer a while back.

Regarding my comments that the stock Rev II needed a good breeze to fly in,
Jeffrey Burka responds:

Quote:
>Heh.  Depends on who's flying the kite.  I know plenty of people who can
>fly a stock II in wind around 4-5 without a problem.

One time last year I competed with a stock Rev II in winds that were 5-6 mph.
I spent a lot of time pulling through the lulls, doing ground recovery,
and fighting to stay off the back line.  I should have named my routine,
"The Joy of Running Backwards".  My skill level is only intermediate,
and perhaps some better flyers could keep it airborn, but personally, I
would be reluctant to say that a stock Rev II can be flown without a problem
in 4-5 mph winds.  Yes, no, maybe?  On all other points, I defer to
Jeff's expertise and experience regarding this subject with no disrespect
intended with this minor difference of opinion.

I plan to compete again, and really, if my stock Rev could fly in 4 mph,
I'd have just bought another Advantage spar after I broke the original.  
But, memories of "The Joy" motivated me to look for ways of lightening my
Rev II up some, after I had tried the UL set and didn't like it.

I flew this past week-end in 11-17 mph winds with sustained winds (up to
30 seconds) of 14-15 mph.  In the air, the 3P frame holds up just fine.
However, I broke my leading edge twice hitting the ground.  I put a 5P
leading edge in, and things worked out just fine.  Personally, I prefer the
heavier stock frame in the stronger winds... the kite is slower, and easier
to control. After I busted the leading edge up, I had enough little pieces to  
be able to construct a symetrical leading edge like the one Jeff recommends.
Folds up a lot nicer, too.  In the 4 to 12 mph wind range, the lighter 3P
frame is really nice.  In stronger winds, the 3P framed Rev is quicker
and harder to control so slipping in a heavier leading edge, helps.  If you
have better touch than I do, and can avoid the inadvertant slam dunk landings,
you could keep the 3P frame in I suppose.  I'm considering just getting
another Rev II for those situations.  (BTW, Jeff, have you ever seen an
Icarex Rev II?  Or, flown one?)

My 3P framed Pro Dancer is holding up great.  The frame matches up well with
this particular kite in that in strong wind, it bends just enough to slow
it down some and reduce pull a little bit.  In the 3 to 12 mph range,
the flex is not a factor but the lighter frame makes the kite more agile
as well as quicker. I like this combination a lot.

       -Bert

 
 
 

Follow Up to "Product Info - Skyshark 3P Spars"

Post by Jeffrey C. Bur » Fri, 27 May 1994 07:01:11

Quote:

>One time last year I competed with a stock Rev II in winds that were 5-6 mph.
>I spent a lot of time pulling through the lulls, doing ground recovery,
>and fighting to stay off the back line.  [...] I would be reluctant to say
>that a stock Rev II can be flown without a problem in 4-5 mph winds.

I'll stand by that wind range.  There are a *lot* of tricks that can be
used with a Rev to keep it airborne in light winds; anyone who's flown a
Rev indoors should be aware of them.  These same techniques can keep a Rev
II aloft in pretty light winds.  Short lines are a big help too.

I don't know if I'd want to fly a routine with a Rev II in 4-5 winds, but
for just noodling around/fun, it's certainly doable.

Quote:
>Personally, I prefer the
>heavier stock frame in the stronger winds... the kite is slower, and easier
>to control.

Agreed.  As I've said, I often use a stock leading edge as the wind picks
up.  My choice of vertical shaft depends on what the wind is, and is not
entirely dependent on what I have in the leading edge.

Quote:
>(BTW, Jeff, have you ever seen an Icarex Rev II?  Or, flown one?)

<grin>  You must not have noticed my recent response to...was it Michael
Graves?  No, I don't think it was...someone, in any event, regarding how
well Icarex holds up after a while.

I've been flying Icarex IIs since June 13th of last year, and I absolutely
love them.  I've currently got 4--two of them will debut at Wildwood this
weekend.   My original two are 3/4oz, and my primary (unbridled) sail has
something like 150-200 hours on it.  It's in great shape, and I've never
needed to tighten the bungees on it.  The primary sail has a 1.5oz nylon
leading edge; the bridled kite has a 3.9oz dacron.

This week I built two new Revs, out of 1/2oz Icarex.  Both have a 1.5oz
leading edge.  One was built for indoor use and has a IIp frame.  Weighs in
at 3.4oz, and is an absolute pleasure indoors.  The other was a replacement,
of sorts, for my primary sail, and will be used for my EIQ ballet.  It has
a IIIp frame.

I can't recommend Icarex highly enough for this purpose...

Jeff

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