"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by bob dun » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 00:43:10


Well folks what a palaver, but for those of you helped a very big thank you,
and I now have the information I need to build a kite  very similar to a Rev
1.5.

I am not used to such groups as this, where the common interest is seemingly
forgotten. In fact have only ever used web based forums previously where
search facilities would appear to be a "god send" for they can avoid some of
this!.

For those who thought I was premature by showing my annoyance with a couple
of individuals, perhaps you were right, judging by the positive response I
received directly. However it would appear that there are an awful number of
long term "users" (or perhaps better described as viewers)of this group who
despise the fact that the few seem to spoil it for all the others. The proof
is in the number of direct mails I received.

Thanks also to those who took the time to put forward constructive views as
to why I should not build a Rev 1.5, this is what it is all about.

On one last note, it would appear that one of those chastising me for my
ethics have, in past, done exactly the same.

Hold on a minute, as I type this, another mail arrives confirming all the
above.

It is incredible that I have barely started kiting, and only just joined
this newsgroup (there is an oxymoron for you), and I end up in the middle of
all this. When you look at what has happened here, with the intimidation etc
it is nothing short of bullying and I always do seem to be the one who
stands up to bullies.

Sorry just got on soap box again, anyway thanks again to all those who took
the time to help, or just confirm their agreement.

Cheers
Bob

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by Dinny » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 01:17:53

I agree with you Bob, I think kiting should be more of a
gentle, relaxing sport but there are cartain snobby elements
to it. Everybody was a newbie once, some folk forget that.

I was in the park last week flying and this dude arrived about
twenty minutes after me. He set up his kite and then walked
over to me. I thought to myself that he was coming over to
introduce himself and talk about kites, the weather etc. But
 instead he asked me to keep my kite on the ground as this
was 'his area' for flying. I was in shock. I told him I was here
first and that I intended to fly for another hour or so. He
then threatened to wreck my kite. I told him to go and f***
himself and that if he touched my kite he'd be eating hospital
food for a week. He packed up and sped off in his car, fuming.


Quote:
> Well folks what a palaver, but for those of you helped a very big thank
you,
> and I now have the information I need to build a kite  very similar to a
Rev
> 1.5.

> I am not used to such groups as this, where the common interest is
seemingly
> forgotten. In fact have only ever used web based forums previously where
> search facilities would appear to be a "god send" for they can avoid some
of
> this!.

> For those who thought I was premature by showing my annoyance with a
couple
> of individuals, perhaps you were right, judging by the positive response I
> received directly. However it would appear that there are an awful number
of
> long term "users" (or perhaps better described as viewers)of this group
who
> despise the fact that the few seem to spoil it for all the others. The
proof
> is in the number of direct mails I received.

> Thanks also to those who took the time to put forward constructive views
as
> to why I should not build a Rev 1.5, this is what it is all about.

> On one last note, it would appear that one of those chastising me for my
> ethics have, in past, done exactly the same.

> Hold on a minute, as I type this, another mail arrives confirming all the
> above.

> It is incredible that I have barely started kiting, and only just joined
> this newsgroup (there is an oxymoron for you), and I end up in the middle
of
> all this. When you look at what has happened here, with the intimidation
etc
> it is nothing short of bullying and I always do seem to be the one who
> stands up to bullies.

> Sorry just got on soap box again, anyway thanks again to all those who
took
> the time to help, or just confirm their agreement.

> Cheers
> Bob


 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by Ceri » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 02:15:56

I also agree with Bob Lighten up people. what happened to helping our fellow
enthusiast.

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by The Puppet Kite Ki » Sun, 19 Aug 2001 19:38:11


Quote:
> Well folks what a palaver, but for those of you helped a very big thank
you,
> and I now have the information I need to build a kite  very similar to a
Rev
> 1.5.

...etc...

 The political and social aspects of kite-flying *can* be a nightmare.
Contrary to what it seemingly is or probably *should be,* kiteflying can be
a very competitive, cut-throat and cruel form of social behavior, and, yes,
you will see many examples of that if you stick around here in rec.kites. I
have seen everything from death threats to personal attacks on other family
members. You *name* it, I've probably seen in here in the past 4 years.
 You haven't seen _anything_, yet, my sheltered buddy. Only the ones with
the strongest armor __or__ the most passion for kites seem to survive.

 (And laughing your ass off REALLY helps. Humor will help you more than
Jesus will in this strange *place.* ;-)

 OTOH, dealing with kites on a *personal* level can be a very rewarding
experience:

 My first homemade kite was an exact copy of a "Team High Fly" dual-line
delta. I got lots of satisfaction from making it, (actually made 2)
primarily because I hadn't sewn anything before in my life and was amazed I
could even do it at that time, and the thought of being able to actually
*make* something that flew *just like* the original gave me a great feeling
of accomplishment.

 Later, I made a bunch of Revolutions... even a few about the size of a 1.5
_before_ the Rev company made one... my theory is there were so many of us
making them that the company realized it was a popular size. I also made
many variations of vented ones... same story... before they were available
commercially.

 It seems to me that the Revolution company was copying people.

 Also, don't overlook the fact that the screening near the LE of the
original kites did debatably "little to nothing" to it's flight
characteristics in reality, and can, in the opinion of many, be eliminated.

 Copying these kites and exploring with variations started me on a journey
of experimental 4, 8 and 12-line kite-making that has been extremely
interesting. I would definitely recommend this route to anyone.

 Start simple. Go on from there.

--
The Puppet Kite Kid
-----------------------------
In Communication With The Puppet Kite Kid:
http://www.yelmtel.com/~rmaddy/

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by Rncemb » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 04:32:06

nice reply Mr Maddy, well thought out, helpful, pleasant tone.
SOWHYTHEF**KDON"T YOU DO THAT MORE   oh was that out loud
if it doesn't blow,it sucks;fly kites     rob cembalest
 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by bob dun » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 06:28:13

Thank you sir, that was much more civil of you. It is a pity that you seem
reluctant to share what is obviously an incredible wealth of knowledge and
experience. I know we all have to learn a little the hard way, but it is so
much better to not keep reinventing the wheel.

Many thanks

Bob

--
Regards

Bobby Dunn


Quote:


> > Well folks what a palaver, but for those of you helped a very big thank
> you,
> > and I now have the information I need to build a kite  very similar to a
> Rev
> > 1.5.
> ...etc...

>  The political and social aspects of kite-flying *can* be a nightmare.
> Contrary to what it seemingly is or probably *should be,* kiteflying can
be
> a very competitive, cut-throat and cruel form of social behavior, and,
yes,
> you will see many examples of that if you stick around here in rec.kites.
I
> have seen everything from death threats to personal attacks on other
family
> members. You *name* it, I've probably seen in here in the past 4 years.
>  You haven't seen _anything_, yet, my sheltered buddy. Only the ones with
> the strongest armor __or__ the most passion for kites seem to survive.

>  (And laughing your ass off REALLY helps. Humor will help you more than
> Jesus will in this strange *place.* ;-)

>  OTOH, dealing with kites on a *personal* level can be a very rewarding
> experience:

>  My first homemade kite was an exact copy of a "Team High Fly" dual-line
> delta. I got lots of satisfaction from making it, (actually made 2)
> primarily because I hadn't sewn anything before in my life and was amazed
I
> could even do it at that time, and the thought of being able to actually
> *make* something that flew *just like* the original gave me a great
feeling
> of accomplishment.

>  Later, I made a bunch of Revolutions... even a few about the size of a
1.5
> _before_ the Rev company made one... my theory is there were so many of us
> making them that the company realized it was a popular size. I also made
> many variations of vented ones... same story... before they were available
> commercially.

>  It seems to me that the Revolution company was copying people.

>  Also, don't overlook the fact that the screening near the LE of the
> original kites did debatably "little to nothing" to it's flight
> characteristics in reality, and can, in the opinion of many, be
eliminated.

>  Copying these kites and exploring with variations started me on a journey
> of experimental 4, 8 and 12-line kite-making that has been extremely
> interesting. I would definitely recommend this route to anyone.

>  Start simple. Go on from there.

> --
> The Puppet Kite Kid
> -----------------------------
> In Communication With The Puppet Kite Kid:
> http://www.yelmtel.com/~rmaddy/

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by EHS » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 09:03:23

Quote:

> I agree with you Bob, I think kiting should be more of a
> gentle, relaxing sport but there are cartain snobby elements
> to it. Everybody was a newbie once, some folk forget that.

> I was in the park last week flying and this dude arrived about
> twenty minutes after me. He set up his kite and then walked
> over to me. I thought to myself that he was coming over to
> introduce himself and talk about kites, the weather etc. But
>  instead he asked me to keep my kite on the ground as this
> was 'his area' for flying. I was in shock. I told him I was here
> first and that I intended to fly for another hour or so. He
> then threatened to wreck my kite. I told him to go and f***
> himself and that if he touched my kite he'd be eating hospital
> food for a week. He packed up and sped off in his car, fuming.

YOW...I don't get headers so I don't know what country you're posting
from but if you're in the US, please share where you were flying. That
sort of behavior is not acceptable and boy howdy I know there are a few
of us here that would like his number. GRRRRR....

Ellen

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by EHS » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 09:41:16


Quote:
> The political and social aspects of kite-flying *can* be a nightmare.
> Contrary to what it seemingly is or probably *should be,* kiteflying can be
> a very competitive, cut-throat and cruel form of social behavior, and, yes,
> you will see many examples of that if you stick around here in rec.kites.

Oh really? Care to cite particulars? The very nature of newsgroups
allows for debate, but how you personally comprehend it is YOUR
responsibility. I'm going to choose to debate what you've said by saying
that you're allowing personal bitterness to color your public
observations. In the brief time (4 yrs) of subscribing to rec.kites I've
rarely seen combativeness regarding clear cut issues. Those posts making
sweeping generalizations, vague and not so vague innenuendo and issuing
personal insults have met with what could be perceived as a cruel form
of social behavior, but they were reactive. Perhaps in an instigators
mind, such as yourself, some r.k. posts may appear to be cruel, but I
have never seen particularly "very competitive" forms of social behavior
here.

Yes, I have seen some COM postings, but COM stands for commercial, and
yes sometimes COMpetitive but not COMbative except two COMplainers who
were trying to make COMpelling debate on why someone should or not
COMpare their offerings with another COMpetitor.

Quote:
> I have seen everything from death threats to personal attacks on other family
> members. You *name* it, I've probably seen in here in the past 4 years.
>  You haven't seen _anything_, yet, my sheltered buddy. Only the ones with
> the strongest armor __or__ the most passion for kites seem to survive.

Roger, no one has ever instigated more personal attacks than you. You
drove off in a matter of one year some of the most gifted, intelligent
and interesting contributors to this newsgroup. You have caused great
personal anguish to people who continue to make the kiting world a
better place to be regardless of your insults. You've made history in
being the only one on this newsgroup who couldn't stick to the topic of
kites but made it your personal platform on issues that have NOTHING to
do with kiting. You've belittled those who have tried desperately to
keep the passion for kites alive and well.

You've recently been playing nice in the sandbox. I am personally
begging you to not start up your vendetta against kiters and kiting
again. There are lots of great new contributors and readers of r.k. and
I'm thrilled that they are here.

Quote:
>  OTOH, dealing with kites on a *personal* level can be a very rewarding
> experience:

And kiting as a social activity is equally rewarding, if not so. History
has proven that to be true. A whole lot longer than you've been around.

Quote:
>  Later, I made a bunch of Revolutions... even a few about the size of a 1.5
> _before_ the Rev company made one... my theory is there were so many of us
> making them that the company realized it was a popular size. I also made
> many variations of vented ones... same story... before they were available
> commercially.

Okay...you want to prove it? Then I want to see you go head to head with
a company Rev Builder and see just how fast you can tie an authentic Rev
Bridle. There's a reason those kites fly so good and it's not just
because someone knows how to operate a sewing machine. I would also like
to see you wrap a Rev Rod that comes close to comparing with theirs.
Better people than you have the "advantage" and know they can't do it as
well.

There are those who do it, and those who just talk about it. Put your
money where your mouth is.

Why do you just***me off so much Roger? Oh I know. It's when you
attack kiters and kiting. That's right. I really hate that.

Ellen

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by Dinny » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 11:02:44

I'm in Canada. I do believe it was an isolated incident
and the guy could have been having the worst day of his
life. But I do remember another guy about 6 years ago
on the shore in Victoria, British Columbia, he was doing
some really nice tricks with a huge ( 100") delta. He was
showing off, which is allowed, but when he talked to
other kiters he was a complete arrogant sod.

I know I can't take these two clowns as a general
representation of the kite-flying world but I'll never
forget them.


Quote:

> > I agree with you Bob, I think kiting should be more of a
> > gentle, relaxing sport but there are cartain snobby elements
> > to it. Everybody was a newbie once, some folk forget that.

> > I was in the park last week flying and this dude arrived about
> > twenty minutes after me. He set up his kite and then walked
> > over to me. I thought to myself that he was coming over to
> > introduce himself and talk about kites, the weather etc. But
> >  instead he asked me to keep my kite on the ground as this
> > was 'his area' for flying. I was in shock. I told him I was here
> > first and that I intended to fly for another hour or so. He
> > then threatened to wreck my kite. I told him to go and f***
> > himself and that if he touched my kite he'd be eating hospital
> > food for a week. He packed up and sped off in his car, fuming.

> YOW...I don't get headers so I don't know what country you're posting
> from but if you're in the US, please share where you were flying. That
> sort of behavior is not acceptable and boy howdy I know there are a few
> of us here that would like his number. GRRRRR....

> Ellen

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by EHS » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 11:11:28

Quote:

> I'm in Canada. I do believe it was an isolated incident
> and the guy could have been having the worst day of his
> life. But I do remember another guy about 6 years ago
> on the shore in Victoria, British Columbia, he was doing
> some really nice tricks with a huge ( 100") delta. He was
> showing off, which is allowed, but when he talked to
> other kiters he was a complete arrogant sod.

> I know I can't take these two clowns as a general
> representation of the kite-flying world but I'll never
> forget them.

Ouch. That stings. Are you still in B.C.? Cuz there are some
phenominally nice people in Vancouver. Please do post again cuz there
are some Western Canucks that post here that I'm sure would love to
prove that your experience was the exception to the rule.

Ellen

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by S. K. Brow » Mon, 20 Aug 2001 11:55:58

Dinnye wrote, partially quoted:

Quote:
> [snip] But I do remember another guy about 6 years ago
> on the shore in Victoria, British Columbia, he was doing
> some really nice tricks with a huge ( 100") delta. He was
> showing off, which is allowed, but when he talked to
> other kiters he was a complete arrogant sod. [snip]

Hmm, I flew down at Clover Point, Victoria quite frequently and am
trying to think of the guilty party. I hope it wasn't *me*, as I often
flew kites of that size back then.

Steve

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by Dinny » Tue, 21 Aug 2001 00:29:22

I'm now in Toronto, which isn't as good for flying, lake
winds just don't match Ocean winds.

Thinking back it was 1994 I was in BC, the year the
Commonwealth games were in town. Don't know if it
was Clover Point. It was about three miles from downtown,
heading East on Dallas Rd. The guy was roughly 45 yrs
old, 200lob, dark hair that was balding a bit.

I doubt this was you as this cretin wouldn't know how to
use a computer :-)



Quote:
> Dinnye wrote, partially quoted:

> > [snip] But I do remember another guy about 6 years ago
> > on the shore in Victoria, British Columbia, he was doing
> > some really nice tricks with a huge ( 100") delta. He was
> > showing off, which is allowed, but when he talked to
> > other kiters he was a complete arrogant sod. [snip]

> Hmm, I flew down at Clover Point, Victoria quite frequently and am
> trying to think of the guilty party. I hope it wasn't *me*, as I often
> flew kites of that size back then.

> Steve

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by S. K. Brow » Tue, 21 Aug 2001 01:52:51

Quote:

> I'm now in Toronto, which isn't as good for flying, lake
> winds just don't match Ocean winds.

> Thinking back it was 1994 I was in BC, the year the
> Commonwealth games were in town. Don't know if it
> was Clover Point. It was about three miles from downtown,
> heading East on Dallas Rd. The guy was roughly 45 yrs
> old, 200lob, dark hair that was balding a bit.

> I doubt this was you as this cretin wouldn't know how to
> use a computer :-)

Hi Dinnye,

That sounds like Clover Point. It's the most popular spot for kite
flying in Victoria.

That doesn't sound like me: about 30 lbs. lighter, younger and had long
blond hair back then.

I think I do know who you're talking about though. He can be a jerk.

Steve

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by Dinny » Tue, 21 Aug 2001 02:13:09

small world, eh?

take care



Quote:

> > I'm now in Toronto, which isn't as good for flying, lake
> > winds just don't match Ocean winds.

> > Thinking back it was 1994 I was in BC, the year the
> > Commonwealth games were in town. Don't know if it
> > was Clover Point. It was about three miles from downtown,
> > heading East on Dallas Rd. The guy was roughly 45 yrs
> > old, 200lob, dark hair that was balding a bit.

> > I doubt this was you as this cretin wouldn't know how to
> > use a computer :-)

> Hi Dinnye,

> That sounds like Clover Point. It's the most popular spot for kite
> flying in Victoria.

> That doesn't sound like me: about 30 lbs. lighter, younger and had long
> blond hair back then.

> I think I do know who you're talking about though. He can be a jerk.

> Steve

 
 
 

"Thank you very much indeed" as a great man used to say

Post by Gabrie » Wed, 22 Aug 2001 10:08:03

Quote:

> introduce himself and talk about kites, the weather etc. But
>  instead he asked me to keep my kite on the ground as this
> was 'his area' for flying. I was in shock. I told him I was here

That was my mom.... sorry... she's such a *** when she's been drinking.

Gabriel