Kite Gathering in Philly

Kite Gathering in Philly

Post by Gary Seube » Wed, 18 Mar 1992 02:27:48


Just saw a brief reference to a Kite Festival at Fairmount Park in Philadelphia the weekend of April 11-12.  I think it's sponsored by Channel 57 in th
Philly area.

If I get any more details (or if someone else has more), more will follow.

Gary Seubert

 
 
 

Kite Gathering in Philly

Post by gas.. » Wed, 18 Mar 1992 03:35:44

After flying a few simple, single line, "nice" kites I went
out and bought myself a trlby single, dual line, finguring I was
getting a "nice" stunt kite that would be more enjoyable than
previous kites I've flown.  Oops.

After triumphantly assembling the thing (the enclosed directions
weren't enclosed.  Put it together wrong several times)  I spent
about 2 hours in the freezing wind; the kite was aloft about 10 minutes.
The biggest problem (besides launching trouble) was that the lines
getting crossed.  Then the thing spirals real bad and makes it worse.

The question:  Am I as much of a moron as I feel?  Is there
anything you can tell me that will increase my flying-to-down time
ratio?  I went out the next day and was aloft for about 10 minutes
in 1 hour... do I just need more practice?

The other questions:  Is the trlby's immense tubular tail an option
or a requirement?  I've flown with and without.   Is there a way
to un-twist the lines mid-flight?  Can I fly by myself or do I need
launching assistance?  Can I fly it single-lined?  I tried it and it
veered real hard to one side as soon as it got up.

Thanks much for any help you can give a budding flyer.  Forgive
the simple questions if they are such.

Nate.

--

Nathan Gasser       ><>        


 
 
 

Kite Gathering in Philly

Post by Gary Seube » Wed, 18 Mar 1992 06:45:05

The only stunt kites I've ever flown have been Trilbys (Trilbies??) and
I've had pretty good luck with them. It did take me a while to get used to
the lines twisting but once I got that down I was OK. Here are some tips
(from a fellow Novice):

When you first start out, use a partner and have them hold the kite still
on the ground.  Lay out the two strings parallel and walk to the end
(where the handles are).  Make sure that the amount of line on each side
is nearly equal (they almost NEVER are when they first come out of the
package).

Once you have two equal lengths, have your partner hold the kite aloft and
launch it when you feel a stiff breeze (don't know the exact specs for ideal
wind speed but people I've talked to say Trilbys need more than other stunt
kites).

Initially, just hang onto both handles and, if the kite is put together right,
it should go straight up. Pull on one handle firmly to start a spiral and,
when a single spiral is complete, ease back on the same handle so it is back
to the starting position and the kite should go up again although the lines
will have a single twist.  Reverse the procedure (pull back on other handle)
and the twist will un-do itself.

Biggest problem I have is that, on a really sunny day, you can't tell at
any given moment whether or not you've gotten all of your "twists" out
and the lines are back to normal.

Other than that - practice and good luck.

Gary Seubert

P.S.  If I want to invest in another (better quality) stunt kite, can someone
make a suggestion? I've heard that Powells are pretty good but have never seen
or flown any.

P.P.S.  I think the tail is optional but I wouldn't fly it without it because
it is the spiraling tail that draws the OOHs and AAHs from the spectators.

 
 
 

Kite Gathering in Philly

Post by Marty Sasa » Thu, 19 Mar 1992 01:52:27

First, go and buy Dave Gomberg's book, "Stunt Kites". A kite shop
should have a copy. If you don't have a kite shop nearby, or if your's
doesn't have one, then you can order one from the Kitelines bookstore,
or one of the mail order places. Check the FAQ, posted here once a
week, for addresses and phone numbers.


|>When you first start out, use a partner and have them hold the kite still
|>on the ground.  Lay out the two strings parallel and walk to the end
|>(where the handles are).  Make sure that the amount of line on each side
|>is nearly equal (they almost NEVER are when they first come out of the
|>package).

The lines should be as close as possible to being exactly the same
length. It it much easier to fly a stunt kite with equal length lines.

|>Once you have two equal lengths, have your partner hold the kite aloft and
|>launch it when you feel a stiff breeze (don't know the exact specs for ideal
|>wind speed but people I've talked to say Trilbys need more than other stunt
|>kites).

Yes, Trlbys do require a bit more wind than some others, especially in
the beginning when you are starting. I would suggest not even going
out if the leaves in the trees aren't rustling, otherwise you won't
have enough wind.

|>Initially, just hang onto both handles and, if the kite is put together right,
|>it should go straight up. Pull on one handle firmly to start a spiral and,
|>when a single spiral is complete, ease back on the same handle so it is back
|>to the starting position and the kite should go up again although the lines
|>will have a single twist.  Reverse the procedure (pull back on other handle)
|>and the twist will un-do itself.

You should be aware in which direction the lines are twisted so that
you can undo them. Flying line can have a few twists in it and you can
still maintain control.

At some point, if you have determined that you like flying stunt
kites, you should replace the flying line line that came with the kite
with Spectra flying line. Spectra is slippery, which means you can put
more twists into the line and still have control of the kite, and it
doesn't stretch very much, which means you can have more precise
control over the kite.

|>Biggest problem I have is that, on a really sunny day, you can't tell at
|>any given moment whether or not you've gotten all of your "twists" out
|>and the lines are back to normal.

There are brightly colored flying lines available which will make this
determination easier. Also, with Spectra line you can often feel when
the lines first become twisted.

|>Other than that - practice and good luck.

Yes, like anything, the more you practice, the better you get...

|>P.S.  If I want to invest in another (better quality) stunt kite, can someone
|>make a suggestion? I've heard that Powells are pretty good but have never seen
|>or flown any.

Many people fly Trlbys exclusively. Most competitors fly the larger
delta/dart shaped kites. Visit a kite shop and ask their opinion, or
better yet, find some experienced kite flyers and ask for their
advice. They will often let you try other kites out, which is the best
way to determine if you want to buy something or not.

Failing that, the net is full of people with opinions about which
kites to buy and which to avoid.

|>P.P.S.  I think the tail is optional but I wouldn't fly it without it because
|>it is the spiraling tail that draws the OOHs and AAHs from the spectators.

One day, I was doing all sorts of neat things with my kite, tip
stands, daring landings, fancy moves of all sorts. I was solo flying
(flying through a dog stake) and doing tricks that way too. No one was
paying any attention to me. They were all watching Hank Manseau fly
his stack of Dyna-kites. The Dyna-kites, with their long flowing tails
were a beautiful spectacle and Hank was doing a good job, but he
wasn't doing anything fancy, just easy passes and loops...
--

Digital Equipment Co.                   Sasaki Kite Fabrications
110 Spit Brook Road ZK02-3/N30          26 Green Street
Nashua, NH 03062                        Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
603-881-0151                            617-522-8546

 
 
 

Kite Gathering in Philly

Post by Kevin P. Tys » Thu, 19 Mar 1992 08:17:42

As a fellow Trlby novice let me throw my two cents and also ask a question.
Most of the time I fly with my daughter so either she or I handle the launch.
She's been down with chicken pox for the last two weekends so I've had to
improvise.  What I've learned is how to self launch a triple by myself.  Prior
to going out to the field I mark the end of one flying line and the handle it
is attached to.  The reason will become obvious latter.  I have two cork***
shaped stakes, intended by the manufacturer for dog training, which I mainly
use for securing my larger single line kites.  I plant one towards the middle
of the flying field.  I assemble the three Trlbys and secure them to the stake
by the bridle lines.  The wind holds the kites up on their edges.  The nose
can be down or up.  After attaching the flying lines to the bridle lines, I
walk directly into the wind until the flying lines are completely unrolled.
Here I plant my second stake and put the handles on it.  Back at the kites I
remove the bridle lines from the stake and remove the stake.  The wind removes
any slack from the line, but the kites should still be on their edge.  The
kites are now held in place by the secured flying lines.  The wind pushes them
back so that the upper edge is slightly behind the lower edge.  Back at the
other end of the line I take the handles off the stake.  Slowly pulling the
handle attacked to the upper edge of the kite, that's why one line is marked,
causes the kites to start to lean forward.  When they get past perpendicular
the nose, if it was down, will start to point up.  Pulling a little further
and the kites leap into the air.  I've done about eight times.  On my last
outting I was able to do this after the kites had crashed.  Each time the wind
was sufficiently strong to cause branches to sway so I guess that 15+ mph.  I
doubt if this would work at the lower end of the Trlby's range.

Now that I've thoroughly confused everyone I'll ask my question.  When I fly
tight figure eights, nose to tail, I occassionaly get the tail of the last
kite drapped over the train lines.  This happens when I oversteer coming out
of the bottom loop.  Can anyone suggest a maneuver that will undo this?
Interestingly it only happens to the tail of the last kite in the train.

Thanks in advance,
Kevin P. Tyson          Phone:  212-657-5928    Fax:    212-825-8607

--

Kevin P. Tyson          Phone:  212-657-5928    Fax:    212-825-8607

 
 
 

Kite Gathering in Philly

Post by pbr.. » Sun, 22 Mar 1992 18:00:32


Quote:
> Now that I've thoroughly confused everyone I'll ask my question.  When I fly
> tight figure eights, nose to tail, I occassionaly get the tail of the last
> kite drapped over the train lines.  This happens when I oversteer coming out
> of the bottom loop.  Can anyone suggest a maneuver that will undo this?
> Interestingly it only happens to the tail of the last kite in the train.

Hmmmmmm...  I was all ready to answer this one when I noticed the bit
about it being the tail of the *last* kite getting caught.  I have
normally flown 6 Trlby's at a time, and I have similar problems if
I do loops that are too tight.  With me, however, it is typically the
tails of the front-most kites that get wrapped around the train lines.
The one remedy that I have found for this, short of landing the kites,
and hoping that I have competent people with me, is to fly the kites
to one side or the other, until they're almost parallel to the direction
of the wind, and thus, not pulling very much at all -- actually they
should be stalling, or close to it.  At this point, I jerk on the
handles alternately -- Left, Right, Left, Right, etc... very quickly,
causing the kites to wave back and forth.  This will often times solve my
problems, the tails magically becoming untangled....  If this doesn't work,
I either live with it, or land the kites and hope I have.... (see above)

To the person who originally wanted help with stunt kites!!!:

I actually started with my Trlby by the "book" -- the little instruction
set or whatever that came with the kite -- they suggest that you simply
fly the kite straight up at first -- which seems quite logical.  Now,
once you've got straight handled, try to veer left and right a little,
always returning to straight.  No loops yet!  Lengthen your left and
right turns, by "turning" left/right, then evening out your lines.
The kite should continue going left/right.  Now turn back to the right/left,
even out the lines, etc... Get these basic ideas down first!  Then try one
loop -- that's a short tug, and then even out the lines -- notice that the
definition of "short" will depend on the wind velocity, and that if you
only give "half of a short tug", you'll be nose diving into the ground, and
you better decide which way you're gonna turn to pull out.  This is very
important when diving -- decide *as you start to dive* which line you're
gonna pull on to get out of it.  Note that if you pulled right to get into
the dive, a left pull at the bottom will leave the lines untangled, whereas
a right pull at the bottom will give you one "twist".  As someone suggested,
when doing loops, alternate in the direction.  It seems like with one
Trlby I could easily put about 20 twists in the line without too much
trouble.  I always count my loops -- like if I want to do more than 2 or 3
loops one direction, and then do the equivalent in the other direction.

By the way, if you're gonna try and fly someone else's kite, don't
let them know that you can only keep your own kite up 10 min/hour! =-)

Oh, and when you crash, check that the plastic clip that holds the cross-spar
in place is secure -- they often come off/loose on impact with the earth.

Hope you figure it out!
--
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/* Paul V. Brown                 *   "I hope you know that this will go */

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