Omni quad

Omni quad

Post by Kenneth Yod » Wed, 25 Mar 1992 08:44:34


Question - Has anyone flown an Omni by Peter Powell??  I saw a fairly good
review of it in an old issue of SKQ (but I didn't see any bad reviews on ANY
kites in that issue).  I would be especially interested in it vs. a REV I or
II.  How does it handle, what wind speed is required, etc.

Thanks!

Ken Yoder

 
 
 

Omni quad

Post by Jeffrey C. Bur » Wed, 25 Mar 1992 22:00:33


Quote:
>Question - Has anyone flown an Omni by Peter Powell??  I saw a fairly good
>review of it in an old issue of SKQ (but I didn't see any bad reviews on ANY
>kites in that issue).  I would be especially interested in it vs. a REV I or
>II.  How does it handle, what wind speed is required, etc.

I've had my Omni for almost a year now.  I don't think I've flown it more
than once every two months.  This is compared to my various revolutions, which
I generally fly at least once a week.

I ordered my Omni based solely on the review in the Spring 1991 SKQ, and
decided rather quickly that the kite doesn't live up to the review.

The two biggest problems with the Omni are that the wing tips flip over far too
easily (and it's much harder to recover from this than it is with a Rev) and
the fact that it simply does not like to move forward/reverse as much as
it does sideways.  (the SKQ review states that the kite will move in all
4 directions with equal speed and alacrity.  this is simply not true).

The Omni is built like a rock--1.5oz nylon and an incredibly heavy fiberglass
"spreader."  An ultralight kit exists, which apparently just consists of an
AFC .2400 replacement spreader.  I've never flown the ultralight.  I do know
that the stock kite takes a pretty good _steady_ wind to keep in the air.  Far
more wind than the Rev, and more wind than the Rev II.  

Lastly, I detest the handles that come with the Omni.  They're huge, heavy,
uncomfortable chunks of plastic.  If you buy an Omni, make your own handles.

It's not _all_ bad news.  The Omni can be incredibly precise, and it's a snap
to hover it in just about any location.  It can move quite quickly laterally,
which is pretty neat to watch, and it does do wonderfully fast prop spins.
I've had several occasions when it's been _fun_ to fly, but as a general
rule, the kite stays in my bag.

One last thing...the SKQ review gives a retail price of $99 for the Omni.
The Omni has never been that cheap.  I paid $135 for mine, and I think it
generally runs between that price and around $150.  This is for the kite
and handles--you'll need lines.  This price makes it comparable to the
Rev II in the basic and classic sail graphics.

Jeff

 
 
 

Omni quad

Post by Marty Sasa » Thu, 26 Mar 1992 01:28:47

I've flown an Omni and my clone of the Omni. I've also flown a tetrad
clone. I've found all of these kites more difficult to handle than a
Rev I or a Rev II, but that's probably because I learned to fly a quad
lined kite on a Rev.

I've watched Dave Kumerski (I've hopelessly misspelled/misremembered
his name, but he's the guy with 4 arms) fly an Omni and he can do
anything that the Rev folks can do. So, it's completely a matter of
practice.

Someone asked about the reviews in Stunt Kite Quarterly. They all seem
to be mostly positive with any negative comments having to do with
small, almost insignificant things. I've talked to some of the folks
at SKQ and the reasons for positive reviews are:

        1. Manufacturers have to give a kite to SKQ for review. No
           sane manufacturer would submit a bad flying kite for
           review.

        2. SKQ strives to be as fair as possible. The reviewers have
           definite flying styles and would therefore tend to give
           high marks to those kites that compliment their style and
           low marks to kites that don't. They therefore try extra
           hard to consider the kite from different points of view. A
           kite might be flown by several reviewers before a review is
           published.

        3. If a kite gets a really bad review, then the manufacturer
           is given the option of removing the kite from the reviewing
           process.

I think that SKQ realizes what kind of impact a good/bad review has on
a kite and tries to be fair to everyone involved.
--

Digital Equipment Co.                   Sasaki Kite Fabrications
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