Quad Parafoils

Quad Parafoils

Post by JIM SONNENMEI » Tue, 16 Mar 1993 23:50:00


I just got the 1993 Into The Wind Catalog  and saw that they have
Quad  line Parafoils now ... was wondering if anyone has any
experience with these compared to other Quads. I did get the handle on a
Revolution ater a bit of practice. Would a Quad Parafoil disappoint
in the region of pull/aerobatics/percision?  .. any input would be
greatly appreciated

thanks

Jim

 
 
 

Quad Parafoils

Post by Jeffrey C. Bur » Fri, 19 Mar 1993 08:07:42

Quote:

>I just got the 1993 Into The Wind Catalog  and saw that they have
>Quad  line Parafoils now ... was wondering if anyone has any
>experience with these compared to other Quads. I did get the handle on a
>Revolution ater a bit of practice. Would a Quad Parafoil disappoint
>in the region of pull/aerobatics/percision?  .. any input would be
>greatly appreciated

A couple of folks have already responded to this, but hey, another voice
won't hurt.  ;-)

The Quadrifoil is a surprisingly good quad.  It's extremely good for
learning quad flying as it's far more forgiving than a Rev (I know quite
a few people who gave up on Revs but love to borrow (and plan to buy!)
Quadrifoils).  They're a bit harder to fly sideways than Revs, but they'll
do it.  They'll also fly in reverse, and you can do tight spins around
the center of the kite.  

The Quadrifoil is very well suited to team flying.  I've done horizontal
threads with a team of 5 'Foils--it's quite a sight!

The Quadrifoil is also a serious power kite, particularly in its two
largest sizes.  But the most common size, the 25, is also quiet

noted here before, I've also used it succesfully for traction whilst
sledding.

The Quadrifoil is available in 5 sizes:  10, 15, 25, 50, and 75.  The 25
is the best all-around kite.  The 10 is for high winds and has a fair amount
of oversteer.  The 15 can handle surprisingly low winds (~5 mph, I'd guess)
and also has a bit of oversteer (which just makes the kite more fun, imo).
The 50 is very much a power kite, popular with the buggy'n'blade crowds,
but it's still quite controllable.  The 75 is pure power, and only
people truly interested in traction will have much interest in it.

The 10 and 15 are actually modified Sparless Stunters (original and II)--those
were some of the first commercial stuntable parafoils on the market.  
To quad them, a Y is sewn onto the back corners, one line at the actual
edge of the kite, the other line where the first internal rib hits the
trailing edge.  

Quadrifoils are well made and can handle a lot of stress.

Jeff
(who hopes he's not coming off as *too* much of a raving Quadrifoil
fanatic, but will note that he's only flown his several Revs once or twice
in the 4 months since he got his Q-25)

--
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