High Wind Kites & Brakes

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Light-Bear » Wed, 07 Apr 1993 03:51:29


Just got back from the 3rd Alamo City Regionals in San Antonio. The turn-out
was light, but we had a great time. Saturday was slow due to rain and
light winds, but NOvice, Intermediate and Experinced precision events
were completed. Sunday was clear, but the winds were 20MPH and variable with
gusts up to 25 or 30. Although all the rest of the events were completed
almost every-one used some type of high-wind equipment.

Since I didn't have a kite for strong winds, I borrowed a Tony Perez custom
kite (can't remember what he calls it) with vents, and a mesh airbrake,
and I used 150' of 150lb line... and I still barely got through my
completely spontaneus (5min) ballet routine (I hadn't planned to fly ballet)
without falling down. The vents and the brake did allow me to do a slide
(complete with a gust induced crash :), and a wingtip, but several times,
the gusts jerked me out of time.

Some other folks also had vented kites but with Dragons added... these
are triangular pieces of ripstop that connect to the stand-off and the
bottom spreader and effectively block airflow through the sail. I didn't
get to fly one, but the people I talked to said they weren't sure if they
liked these or the mesh better.

Anyway, the whole point of this long preamble is to solicit advice and
suggestions for high wind situations. What are the various methods for
dealing with high winds that still allow precise, controlled manuevers
and stunts (like stalls, slides, wingtips)? I think I like the mesh brake
so far, but I'm still looking.

Thanks,
Dean

--


/ \         _/   | Austin, TX 78712         | -----------------------------|
-----------------| "No, it's not a spaceship, it's a Stunt Kite... sheesh! |

 
 
 

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Simo Salan » Wed, 07 Apr 1993 21:55:07


(text deleted)

Quote:
>Some other folks also had vented kites but with Dragons added... these
>are triangular pieces of ripstop that connect to the stand-off and the
>bottom spreader and effectively block airflow through the sail. I didn't
>get to fly one, but the people I talked to said they weren't sure if they
>liked these or the mesh better.

Could somebody describe this "dragon technique" in more detail...

Smooth Winds
Simo Salanne

 
 
 

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Patrick Pross » Wed, 07 Apr 1993 22:23:17

In Washington (UK) 1992 there was a gale blowing. One of the teams were
using LiteFlites!! You know the panel in the LF? Well, it was made of
guaze. That is, about 50% of the sail was gauze, and the fabric part was
basically the perimeter around the gauze. The kites flew "as normal".

Patrick

 
 
 

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Marty Sasa » Thu, 08 Apr 1993 01:15:46

The first screen door kite that I saw and had a chance to fly was a
North Shore VIP (designed by our own Darrin Skinner). For those who
haven't seen or flown a screen kite, part of the sail is replaced with
a very wind pourous material, often fiberglass and plastic window and
door screening material. The screening material reduces the effective
surface area and increases drag. This reduces forward speed, which
also reduces pull significantly.

Others have experimented and manufactured screen kites to cope with
higher wind without changing the basic flying characteristics of the
kites. One problem with screening is that the placement and size of
the screen can be critical to the kite's performance. I once placed a
screen panel on a kite in the perfect place to make turning horrible
and with no noticeable decrease in speed or pull.

The next change that I saw on the flying field were "diapers". These
were rectangular pieces of fabric that were placed between the two
standoffs on an NBK. The NBK has two parrallel standoffs. The Duel
Drones, a pairs ballet team from Connecticut were experimenting this
way.

Other things include the triangular patches on kites that had only one
standoff, a triangular piece of fabric on the back side of the kite
supported by spar which was at right angles to the spine and pointing
backwards.

Dave Simpson, a Rhode Island flyer and member of the High Flyers
Flight Squadron, began experimenting with rectangular pieces of fabric
strung in front of the kite between the two flying lines. These worked
pretty well, but the size of the fabric could adversely effect a
kite's performance, it depends on the wind. Dave has recently started
using fiberglass screening instead of the fabric. He calls these
gizmos "Wind Tamers" and has started to sell them. Dave says that he
first saw them in the UK, or at least that's what I remember him
saying, I could have mis-remembered.

Anyway, the wind tamers do a good job of slowing down a kite. The
screening is pourous enough that turning and general flyability of a
kite are changed very little. Different widths have more or less drag.
Obviously, the wider widths have more drag.

These work great on most kites. On really radical, fast turning kites
the slowing effect on the turns might take some getting used to. I put
a smaller screen on a Katana and I couldn't do a lot of the stunts
that I normally do with the kite. No problems at all with the team
kites.

I hear that you can get a Magnum Opus with a screen "air brake" on the
back ofthe kite and that Chicago Fire is selling these things for
other kites as well.

In high wind, "air brakes" and screen kites do make a difference. If
you face occasional high wind you might look into the add on air
brakes, more prevalent high winds suggest screen kites.
--
Marty Sasaki            Harvard University           Sasaki Kite Fabrications

617-496-4320            10 Ware Street               Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
                        Cambridge, MA 02138-4002     phone/fax: 617-522-8546

 
 
 

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Light-Bear » Thu, 08 Apr 1993 03:52:54

Quote:


>(text deleted)

>>Some other folks also had vented kites but with Dragons added... these
>>are triangular pieces of ripstop that connect to the stand-off and the
>>bottom spreader and effectively block airflow through the sail. I didn't
>>get to fly one, but the people I talked to said they weren't sure if they
>>liked these or the mesh better.

>Could somebody describe this "dragon technique" in more detail...

>Smooth Winds
>Simo Salanne

Sorry Simo, that wasn't a very clear explanation. If you view the kite
belly-down and nose facing away:

                -                  -
              / | \              / | \
             /  |  \            /  |  \
           /    |    \        /    |    \
         /      |      \    /      |      \
       /========|======= -- =======|======= \

The Dragons (note, this may not be how they spell the trademarked name),
are placed on the standoff and the cross-spar:

                -                  -
              / | \              / | \
             // | \\            // | \\
           / /  |  \ \        / /  |  \ \
         /  /   |   \  \    /  /   |   \  \
       /===/=========\== -- ==/====|====\== \

Well, it's hard to draw in ASCII, but I hope you get the idea.

Disclaimer: I don't remember the manufacturers name, and I don't
know if they have copyrights or patents. I'm just repoting what I've seen
at a public event.

Hope that clears things up a bit.

Dean
--


/ \         _/   | Austin, TX 78712         | -----------------------------|
-----------------| "No, it's not a spaceship, it's a Stunt Kite... sheesh! |

 
 
 

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Andrew Beatt » Thu, 08 Apr 1993 05:48:30

Quote:

>In Washington (UK) 1992 there was a gale blowing. One of the teams were
>using LiteFlites!! You know the panel in the LF? Well, it was made of
>guaze.

This is a liteflite sieve.  I don't think that it is a production kite,
but you may be able to talk the KiteStore, London into making one for you.

There was so much wind at Washington, that the sieves were still an handful.

Andrew
--

 
 
 

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Simo Salan » Thu, 08 Apr 1993 23:36:01


Quote:

>>In Washington (UK) 1992 there was a gale blowing. One of the teams were
>>using LiteFlites!! You know the panel in the LF? Well, it was made of
>>guaze.
>This is a liteflite sieve.  I don't think that it is a production kite,
>but you may be able to talk the KiteStore, London into making one for you.

As far as I know they (Blast) are going to change LiteFlite(s) to
Edge...

Smooth Winds
Simo

 
 
 

High Wind Kites & Brakes

Post by Dan Rube » Sun, 11 Apr 1993 05:33:42

Quote:
Marty writes:

[lots of good info deleted]

Quote:
>I hear that you can get a Magnum Opus with a screen "air brake" on the
>back of the kite and that Chicago Fire is selling these things for
>other kites as well.
>--
>Marty Sasaki            Harvard University           Sasaki Kite Fabrications

>617-496-4320            10 Ware Street               Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
>                        Cambridge, MA 02138-4002     phone/fax: 617-522-8546

Actually, the brake that Chi Fire is selling is made of a screen reinforced
translucent plastic (vinyl?) like is used in the Radian Prism or windsurfer
sail windows. It does help to slow the Magnum Opus some in higher winds.
Dorothy Wolfe tells me that it's being made by one of the Chicago area kite
makers for them.. They call it a 'Bikini Brake'. I haven't tried it on
anything but the MO as yet, but it should work well.. Only takes a few
to install/remove..

- - - - - - - - - - - - -

Dan Rubesh                                           Wind Wizard, Purveyor of
UUCP: {ucsd, nosc}!crash!danr       GO               Stunt Kites & Accessories


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