Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by Manky Badge » Fri, 04 Oct 2002 03:45:21


My local kite club is thinking of putting on a kite festival next year, and
we'd like to ask the kiting world what it wants from a kite festival.

First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

Should it be an event for the general public who will tangle and then throw
away a 1.99 mickey mouse on a string?

Should we invite dealers?

Should we put on refreshments?

Should we have toilet facilities?

Should we have an arena featuring display flying?

Should we have a buggy-ing area?

If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

All comments will be welcomed. Thanks in advance

MB

http://www.e-l-f.org.uk

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by G Pee » Fri, 04 Oct 2002 04:05:17

Hi

Quote:
> First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

Depends on how big the festival is, and if there are traders on site.

Quote:
> Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

Weekend event, you will find more will be there on Sunday.

Quote:
> Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

No, my idea of a festival is to introduce the sport to the public.

Quote:
> Should it be an event for the general public who will tangle and then
throw
> away a 1.99 mickey mouse on a string?

Yes its all about Fun

Quote:
> Should we invite dealers?

Yes, but invite them early on in the season BEFORE their diary is booked up.

Quote:
> Should we put on refreshments?

> Should we have toilet facilities?

> Should we have an arena featuring display flying?

Yes to all of the above

Quote:
> Should we have a buggy-ing area?

If you have room

Quote:
> If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

No, for safty reasons.
Quote:

> All comments will be welcomed. Thanks in advance

> MB

> http://www.e-l-f.org.uk


 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by ebbin » Fri, 04 Oct 2002 04:41:56

Quote:

> My local kite club is thinking of putting on a kite festival next year,
> and we'd like to ask the kiting world what it wants from a kite festival.
> First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

Depends on how large the festival is, I travelled 80 miles to go to Bristol
kite festival

Quote:
> Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

Again depend on how large the festival is, one local shop\trader and half
dozen local kite flyers are going to be hard pushed to offer two days worth
of entertainment

Quote:
> Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

NO! everybody welcome

Quote:
> Should it be an event for the general public who will tangle and then
> throw away a 1.99 mickey mouse on a string?

As above

Quote:
> Should we invite dealers?

Yes manufacturers as well

Quote:
> Should we put on refreshments?

Yes, but careful thought has to be given to laying on ***

Quote:
> Should we have toilet facilities?

Yes

Quote:
> Should we have an arena featuring display flying?

Yes

Quote:
> Should we have a buggy-ing area?

Only if you have sufficient space and enough buggiers to race\put on a good
display

Quote:
> If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

As above

Quote:
> All comments will be welcomed. Thanks in advance

Check out public liability insurance

Don't forget all your hard work can be ruined by the weather

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by John Hartnu » Fri, 04 Oct 2002 18:37:08


Quote:
> My local kite club is thinking of putting on a kite festival next
> year, and we'd like to ask the kiting world what it wants from a kite
> festival.

> First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

I've only been to one -- we drove from Leamington Spa to Lytham St Annes --
150 miles, along a frequently stationary M6. I'd happily do the same kind of
journey again.

Quote:
> Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

If there's enough going on, definitely worth a two-dayer. We stayed in a B&B
for Fylde.

Quote:
> Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

Absolutely not. One of the nicest things about Fylde was all the kids who
weren't expecting a kite festival, but ended up filling what sky was left
with little sleds.

Quote:
> Should it be an event for the general public who will tangle and then
> throw away a ?1.99 mickey mouse on a string?

One good thing about festivals is that the general public get to buy kites
from reputable traders, who will sell them a nice 3.99 ripstop sled that
will last for years, instead of a 1.99 polythene one which will fall apart
in a stiff breeze.

What better chance to these people get to learn how to avoid tangles, than
to fly in the proximity of experienced, friendly, helpful kite fliers?

If you don't like "the general public" I'd suggest you don't run a festival!

Quote:
> Should we invite dealers?

Yes.

Quote:
> Should we put on refreshments?

Depends on the location; Lytham has plentiful permanent food and drink
places. If you're in a field somewhere, then certainly invite a burger van
or something.

Quote:
> Should we have toilet facilities?

Um, yes!

Quote:
> Should we have an arena featuring display flying?

Yes. This is a crowd puller.

Quote:
> Should we have a buggy-ing area?

Tricky, that one.  I think you have to aim this at spectators rather than
buggiers -- after all, buggiers don't need a festival to buggy at.  If
you're lucky enough to have an area which is both suitable for buggying, and
has some sort of raised area (dune walkway, etc.) where spectators can see
what's happening, then that would be great. Some sort of (amplified)
commentary would help with this too.

Likewise, maybe some sort of try-it-out sessions for newcomers to the sport
might be nice (but who's going to accept the liability, risk their precious
kites, etc.?).

Quote:
> If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

I'm backing out of that one. It's not my scene, it might be other people's.

You missed out, (maybe because it's obvious? Or maybe because it's not?) BIG
DISPLAY KITES. Inflatable animals, flying trousers, huge flowforms
supporting tons of laundry. Trains and arches, spinners and windsocks. This
sort of thing is low-maintenance once it's up (I imagine), draws a crowd,
and makes a stunning backdrop to things like ballet displays.

It seems we're reaching a point where kiting means radically different
things to different people, and few people have an interest which spans the
entire range. Traction kiters aren't interested in sports kites; sports
kiters aren't interested in single line kites, etc.  I'd suggest that if
your festival is going to specialise in one form of kiting over another,
then your publicity material needs to reflect this.  You don't want a single
line kite enthusiast to turn up only to find that the site is full of
buggiers who only see his kite's line as an obstacle.

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by Andrew Beatti » Fri, 04 Oct 2002 20:51:09

Quote:
>My local kite club is thinking of putting on a kite festival next year, and
>we'd like to ask the kiting world what it wants from a kite festival.

I think you need to start by asking some questions of yourselves.

Why do *you* want to hold an event?

It's important to understand your own motives.  That way, you can
check each decision and evaluate whether or not it is in line with
the things that you are trying to achieve.

Lets look at some examples of good festivals:

Fano.  This is an international kitefliers meeting.  There is no
arena, no public.  No-one is paid to attend.  The organizers arrange
access to an outstanding venue and the result is a social event for
kite fliers.  The test of success is whether or not the event was good
for kite fliers.  [They also raise huge amount of money at auction
which is used to build orphanages in Eastern Europe]

Washington.  This is a public festival.  The organisers use money from
corporate sponsors and traders to bring in fliers fron round the
globe.  They put on a professional display which attracts huge numbers
of public giving exposure to the sponsor.  There is plenty of room for
the public to fly, a central display changing all day, but limited
room for all the kite filers.  Bristol is similar.  The test of
success is whether or not the event was good for the sponsors.

Or maybe you want to run a "Recruitment" event.  Something on a local
scale, where the object is to recruit new members to your club,
encouraging members to engage with the public, help them fly, and
introduce them to flying.

Quote:
>First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

If it's within say 100 miles, it's local.  It would have to be
something special (Fano, Scheveingen, Washington, BBT, AKA) to
spend a day travelling to get there)

Quote:
>Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

if it's one day, make it Sunday.  Dunstable is Excellent and it's only
one day.  If you do a weekend, you need to provide camping.

Quote:
>Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

That depends on your objectives...

Quote:
>Should we invite dealers?

Yes.  They are an essential component of most events.  They also
provide finance (but in turn, you need to provide them with
customers!)

Quote:
>Should we put on refreshments?

Yes.  Get the pancake guy.

Quote:
>Should we have toilet facilities?

Yep.

Quote:
>Should we have an arena featuring display flying?
>Should we have a buggy-ing area?
>If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

These sort of things depend upon your objectives.

Andrew

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by John Hartnu » Fri, 04 Oct 2002 21:43:51


Quote:
> If it's within say 100 miles, it's local.

That depends on what country you're in. In the UK 100 miles is generally
considered a fairly major expedition; you can get from coast to coast in
about 80 miles if you choose your points on the coast carefully, but it
takes time.

Having said that, this summer we met a post office cashier in UP Michigan,
having driven 2000 miles or so from Seattle, who told us that the road ahead
was long and boring: "30 miles of nothing, we call it the Seney Straight"...

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by Andrew Beatti » Fri, 04 Oct 2002 22:58:40



Quote:

>> If it's within say 100 miles, it's local.

>That depends on what country you're in. In the UK 100 miles is generally
>considered a fairly major expedition;

I live in Basingstoke in the UK.  My local events include Brighton (89
miles), Bristol (86 miles) and Dunstable (70 miles).  Both certainly
close enough that I will usualy sleep at home on the Saturday night.

Washington Tyne and Wear (318 miles) or Schevening (360 miles and
a channel crossing) is a bit of a slog, but I've only missed
Washington once in the last decade and might fix a trip to Schevening
only the night beofre leaving.

An "expedition" would be something like Fano (794 miles) or a trip to
the high desert in California, which needs to be planned more than a
day in advance.

Andrew

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by Mark de Roussi » Sat, 05 Oct 2002 06:58:21

Quote:

> My local kite club is thinking of putting on a kite festival next year, and
> we'd like to ask the kiting world what it wants from a kite festival.

> First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

Depends how good it is :). But seriously, you shouldn't place too much
emphasis on this consideration when starting a new festival.

If you want a 'general purpose' festival that attracts the public, you
are dependant primarily on your local communitie(s). Cultivate them
assiduously. Talk to local authorities. Talk to local schools, scout
groups, etc. Investigate local sponsors.  You need to design the event
to appeal to/make use of all of these, whilst at the same time
catering for ( rather than depending on ) kitefliers from outside your
local group. Try to get as much free publicity as possible from the
local free paper(s).

If you're thinking of a highly specialised event that focuses on
particular kiteflying niche, it's likely that the ( small number of )
participants will be willing to travel a large distance.

Quote:
> Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

There are pro's and conn's each way. The camping needs to be very
close indeed to the site itself. If people have to walk more than 100m
from their tent to the arena, they'll moan :). Remember that you will,
at the very least, have to provide a drinking water supply and
toilets. Security may be a concern too, depending on the exact
circumstances. If you're strapped for funds ( and you probably are )
you should reckon on charging for camping, which means that you must
somehow ensure that campers have paid up before they leave ( or even
before they pitch ).

I'd say keep it simple the first time round, and just do the one day.
You'll learn alot, you probably won't need time off work to recover,
and you'll reduce your costs.

Quote:
> Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

That's a policy decision for you alone. But remember that it will make
funding the event more difficult, because you may well find that you
have overheads that *won't* decrease substantially if you just have a
few kitefliers there as opposed to larger numbers of people. Plus,
non-kite related sponsors want public.

Quote:
> Should it be an event for the general public who will tangle and then throw
> away a 1.99 mickey mouse on a string?

See above.

Quote:
> Should we invite dealers?

I think you mean 'traders', unless you plan on using chemicals other
than *** and nicotine :). Yes, you should invite them. They are
another source of income, although they won't expect to pay much for a
new, small, one day festival.

Quote:
> Should we put on refreshments?

Again, another source of income. But watch out for any local authority
health regulations. The local authority may have an 'approved list' of
food vendors, which you may wish to consult. All food vendors should
have a some sort of hygiene certificate ( I forget what it's called
exactly ). Be a little careful about doing it yourselves if you're
dealing with the general public - I don't know exactly what the legal
situation is there.

Be careful about ice cream vendors in particular. Of all the many food
traders we've had at Basingstoke, many of which have been very good,
that's the category that's given us most hassle.

Quote:
> Should we have toilet facilities?

Yes. Think 'women and children'....

Quote:
> Should we have an arena featuring display flying?

Probably. It helps to focus the public's attention, and is a 'safe' (
or 'safer', anyway ) space to fly fast/big/powerful/expensive stuff.
But this is another policy decision - what's your festival all about ?

Quote:
> Should we have a buggy-ing area?
> If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

Don't underestimate the amount of room this will need if thirty or
forty buggiers descend on you. And I've yet to be persuaded that buggy
competitions constitute entertainment for the general public, though
this might not be your plan. But again, your festival, your call.

Some things to think about :

1. Will you need a PA system ? Its tricky to announce/describe
displays to the public without one.

2. Will you charge for car parking ? That needs personnel.

3. Will you want first aid ? If you need St Johns etc, book them as
soon as possible.

4. If you want to pull in general public, consider having some
non-kiteflying attractions there aswell ( bouncy castle, etc ).

5. If you want a beer tent ( potentially a good source of income ),
you need a friendly landlord to get the license ( + beer ) for you, or
someone credible to stand up in court :). They'll be concerned about
children ( will you be selling soft drinks ? ), about security, about
whether you can shut the place down effectively when it's supposed to
be shut, about the proximity of schools ( but it's on a weekend... ),
proximity of other licenced premises, but nothing too dramatic - any
semi-sensible application should succeed.

6. Will you get third party insurance for the event ? Sponsors may
require that you have this. It might be sensible anyway.

7. As with the first aid, book the toilets ASAP.

8. If you want kite traders and other kitefliers, your main problem is
to pick a suitable date that doesn't clash too badly with other
festivals. Think of it like this - if, on the date you're thinking of,
you would otherwise be considering being somewhere else, then you've
got a problem.

                                MdeR

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by John Hartnu » Tue, 08 Oct 2002 22:25:30


Quote:
>> That depends on what country you're in. In the UK 100 miles is
>> generally considered a fairly major expedition;

> I live in Basingstoke in the UK.

Oops ;)    Basingstoke is quite well connected by motorways though, isn't
it? More so than most places.  Maybe I'm only speaking for myself though,
when I say 100 miles is a two hour drive each way. If I drive four hours in
a day, I don't want to do much else...
 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by robin43 » Sat, 12 Oct 2002 20:50:02

Dear MB,

Obviously toilets and refreshments.   My biggest suggestion is to
advertise the event!!.

I no longer kite fly, due to commitments, but I always try and keep an
eye out for the local annual event and attend it if I can that if I
know about it.  I am very lucky if I spot the adverti***t in the
local rag or in the weekend feature section.

Now as a member of the public and not an enthusiast it amazes me why
events are not advertised earlier.  There are any number of free
circulars, posters, radio what's on, newsletters that can be used to
advertise events.   Please tell people in advance of the event give a
free demo to the radio station etc so that there is some hope that the
public will turn up.  I think stallholders need the public's support
in order to make it worth while attending the event.

Personally I'd throw in a couple of competitions, Indian kitefighting
and  large rokaku fighting.  There is nothing like the destruction of
a kite to keep peoples interest in an event.

Good luck

robin4340

Quote:

> My local kite club is thinking of putting on a kite festival next year, and
> we'd like to ask the kiting world what it wants from a kite festival.

> First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

> Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

> Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

> Should it be an event for the general public who will tangle and then throw
> away a 1.99 mickey mouse on a string?

> Should we invite dealers?

> Should we put on refreshments?

> Should we have toilet facilities?

> Should we have an arena featuring display flying?

> Should we have a buggy-ing area?

> If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

> All comments will be welcomed. Thanks in advance

> MB

> http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by John Dobso » Sat, 12 Oct 2002 23:27:03

Quote:
> My biggest suggestion is to
> advertise the event!!. There are any number of free
> circulars, posters, radio what's on, newsletters that can be used to
> advertise events.    I think stallholders need the public's support
> in order to make it worth while attending the event.

> Personally I'd throw in a couple of competitions, Indian kitefighting
> and  large rokaku fighting.

I agree with all these. Sprint competitions are popular with the public too.
Teddybear dropping also attracts people provided they know it will happen.

Quote:
>> First off, how far are you prepared to travel to get to a festival?

50 miles max for a 1-day event, 100 or more for a two-day event
Quote:

>> Should it be a one day event, or be a camp-over for a weekend ?

Campover is always better, then I can come on the Friday afternoon/evening
for an early start Saturday
Quote:

>> Should it be an event for "serious kite fliers" only?

No, Kite workshops for kids are always popular. Also people who buy
readymades from traders will want to fly them straightaway.
But a marked-off arena for professionals is a must.

Quote:

>> Should it be an event for the general public who will tangle and then throw
>> away a 1.99 mickey mouse on a string?

Get good traders and don't disparage what they sell. They have a living to
make.
Quote:

>> Should we invite dealers?
Yes

>> Should we put on refreshments?

Essential, unless there is an adjacent pub; see answer to next question.
Quote:

>> Should we have toilet facilities?

You will find this is a requirement from the local council so you have no
choice. (You may be able to arrange this in advance with a local pub though
provided it is adjacent to the site)
Quote:

>> Should we have an arena featuring display flying?

separate arenas for single and dual/quad lines are important for safety
reasons
Quote:

>> Should we have a buggy-ing area?

only if space permits
Quote:

>> If so, should we have buggy-ing competitions (races, etc)?

pass, I'm not a buggy person.

You will need to get insurance. This again will probably be a legal
requirement imposed by the council. Getting insurance nowadays involves a
risk assessment exercise, not hard to do once you know exactly what you're
going to allow and how you're going to police it, but needs to be done.

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by Charlie Charlto » Sun, 13 Oct 2002 05:04:24

How about a theme

Some kite festivals ( like Dieppe) have a theme and a competiton to go with
it.

and all the other stuff too

also worth considering what all these visitors will do if the weather either
turns wet and miserable or curse of curses, NO WIND !

Washington has some great music and display stuff inside the tents

Charlie

 
 
 

Kite festivals - what do YOU want ?

Post by Manky Badge » Sun, 13 Oct 2002 08:25:27


Quote:
> My local kite club is thinking of putting on a kite festival next year,
and
> we'd like to ask the kiting world what it wants from a kite festival.

All comments will be welcomed. Thanks in advance

Just a quick note to say thanks to all who've commented.
It's interesting that the comments on line and in emails have been very pro-
the general public being involved whereas comments frm individuals met a
kite festivals are more for a "kiters only" festival.

Anyway - next year - somewhere in south Kent - look out for details - see
you there

 MB

 http://www.e-l-f.org.uk