Advice for a first time gear buyer

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Nina H. Yu » Wed, 15 Oct 1997 04:00:00


Hi all,

I'm a level 3-4 skier and decided that it's high time I bought some of my
own gear.  First step was boots; I just got a pair of Dalbello Diva MX 59
that seem to fit quite well (I had a devil of a time trying to find boots
in size 22.5; the only other ones I could find were Nordica Next 67, which
didn't fit me quite right.)  I plan to ski an average of one to two days
a week (at least a half day/night a week, and some weekend days, and *maybe*
a week-long trip once during the season).  My questions are:

- I'd like to advance to level 6-7 by the end of the season; is this
reasonable considering my anticipated schedule and the fact that I'm not
the fastest learner when it comes to things that require coordination?  :)

- are there other boots that would be a better choice for me, in the
collective wisdom of r.a.s?  I'm looking of course for the ultimate
compromise between a boot appropriate for me now, and one that I can grow
into and not have to replace in a season (though at $180, the Dalbello's
were cheap enough that I wouldn't mind buying better boots in a couple of
years.)

- I'd originally thought that buying skis would be a bad thing to do at my
current skill level, but now I'm not as sure, since the cost is a toss up
either way.  Is it possible for me to buy something now that I'll still be
happy with next season?

Thanks very much for any advice or suggestions!
-nhy

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance.    -- Will Durant
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Dale Bi » Wed, 15 Oct 1997 04:00:00


: Hi all,
:
: I'm a level 3-4 skier and decided that it's high time I bought some of my

3-4??? What the hell does that mean? Are you from New York or something?
No real skier would ever use that screwed up, rental shop rating system
that doesn't say a damn thing about skiing.

: own gear.  First step was boots; I just got a pair of Dalbello Diva MX 59
: that seem to fit quite well (I had a devil of a time trying to find boots
: in size 22.5; the only other ones I could find were Nordica Next 67, which
: didn't fit me quite right.)  I plan to ski an average of one to two days
: a week (at least a half day/night a week, and some weekend days, and *maybe*
: a week-long trip once during the season).  My questions are:

I smell bull shit

:
: - I'd like to advance to level 6-7 by the end of the season; is this
: reasonable considering my anticipated schedule and the fact that I'm not
: the fastest learner when it comes to things that require coordination?  :)
:

What? Like are you trying to ski intermediate cruisers or something?

: - are there other boots that would be a better choice for me, in the
: collective wisdom of r.a.s?  I'm looking of course for the ultimate

rsa has no wisdom, there are just a bunch of lame people who have nothing
better to do than to make sheep jokes, brag about their schlongs and
torment women.

And if you really want to improve, and impress your friends, subscribe to
SKI magazine, buy a Toyota 4Runner and go to Vail.
Dale

--
*****************************************************         /\
You can't be lost if you don't care where you are.  *       _/  \
*****************************************************    __/     \_
                                                       _/          \
Dale Bish                                             /             \_  
Student, ski bum, future problem for social inequities                \

Email me at:                    Or check out my websites:

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                                http://www.rockandice.com

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Jim Stroh » Wed, 15 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Dale, no offence, but have u got PMS or something?

Give him a break, he's been sick.

Bish, glad you're back.

Jim in Texas
setting the stage for a fish fry -- with trout

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Jim Stroh » Wed, 15 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Nina, pay no attention to the posters behind the curtain.
It's RSA, and it's a little rowdy here sometimes.  You have
to sort through the weird to find the good.

Basically, you are on the right track by buying boots.
You may not have bought the very best -- don't worry, these
boots give you a baseline against which to compare skis
and other boots later.

Your most important part of skiing is to have comfortable
feet inside boots that hook up to your skis and let you
feel what's happening.  Since you're a developing skiier,
it's a good idea to talk with your instructor about how
your feet feel the hill, and how you're responding and reacting
to what you feel.  If you're serious about becoming a much better
skiier real fast, you should look into semi-private lessons.

It is not cheap -- and your most effective instructor will likely
be somebody of the same gender with whom you can build a good rapport.
You should buy them a beer after the lesson and talk about everything
EXCEPT skiing -- if you hit it off, you may be on your way.

Learning to ski really well (unless you're born to ski) can be
a challenge.  Finding an effective instructor for you is even
harder.  You can meet in the middle by becoming friends with
your instructor -- with a bond of friendship (OK, OK, even if
you pay for your friends), your instructor will work five times
as hard to get you to be where you want to be.

It's OK to be friends, even if cash-ola is involved.  Think
about it -- of your acquaintances at work, ALL of whom are
being paid to be there, are you more effective at any or all
levels with your friends -- or with the people you can't stand?

Your ski instructor is your friend -- or they SHOULD be.

That's where to put your money to be a good skiier, now that you've
got your feet taken care of.

Once you find your center as a skiier, you can worry about buying skis.
Til then, rent demos and trash 'em!  That's how I learned, and they
didn't whack me for it, even though I am a Texan and on the open season
list in 15 western states.

Jim in Texas
where we ski behind boats and Buicks

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Alan Bouce » Wed, 15 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Dale Bish decided to prove that he deserves all the bashing he gets in
this newsgroup by bashing an honest newbie asking good questions:

Quote:


> : Hi all,
> :
> : I'm a level 3-4 skier and decided that it's high time I bought some of my

> 3-4??? What the hell does that mean? Are you from New York or something?
> No real skier would ever use that screwed up, rental shop rating system
> that doesn't say a damn thing about skiing.

Actually, with a panix address, it does mean that Nina is probably from
New York. Lots of smart people there. Lots of skiers there. More ski
areas than California.

She's referring to the PSIA system, which people who are just learning
to ski have a chance of understanding. Any idiot knows that US rental
shops have three categories I II and III.

What it means is that she's just starting to make parallel turns, she
enjoys skiing, and wants to get better.

Quote:
> : own gear.  First step was boots; I just got a pair of Dalbello Diva MX 59
> : that seem to fit quite well (I had a devil of a time trying to find boots
> : in size 22.5; the only other ones I could find were Nordica Next 67, which
> : didn't fit me quite right.)  I plan to ski an average of one to two days
> : a week (at least a half day/night a week, and some weekend days, and *maybe*
> : a week-long trip once during the season).  My questions are:

> I smell bull shit

probably because you're spewing it.

Quote:
> :
> : - I'd like to advance to level 6-7 by the end of the season; is this
> : reasonable considering my anticipated schedule and the fact that I'm not
> : the fastest learner when it comes to things that require coordination?  :)
> :

> What? Like are you trying to ski intermediate cruisers or something?

Not a bad ambition for a recreational skier.

Quote:

> : - are there other boots that would be a better choice for me, in the
> : collective wisdom of r.a.s?  I'm looking of course for the ultimate

> rsa has no wisdom, there are just a bunch of lame people who have nothing
> better to do than to make sheep jokes, brag about their schlongs and
> torment women.

Obviously you haven't been paying attention. Quite a few of the spewers
of silliness and ribaldry are better skiers than you'll ever be.

Quote:
> And if you really want to improve, and impress your friends, subscribe to
> SKI magazine, buy a Toyota 4Runner and go to Vail.
> Dale

So that's what you aspire to? Try not having contempt for the people who
buy the lift tickets and gear that keeps skiing afloat. You depend on
the ski business infrastructure far more than I'd expect you'd be
willing to admit.

look at Nina's sig, you might learn something from it:

Quote:
>> Education is a progressive discovery of our own ignorance.    -- Will Durant

--

| alan

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Todd Tilto » Wed, 15 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hi all,

> I'm a level 3-4 skier <snip>  My questions are:

> - I'd like to advance to level 6-7 by the end of
> the season; is this reasonable considering my
> anticipated schedule and the fact that I'm not
> the fastest learner when it comes to things that
> require coordination?  :)

If you ski 25 times this season, and take a lesson
each time you go skiing, you can probably improve
from a 3-4 to a 5-6.  If you were a fast learner
you might be able to get to 7, but probably not.
If you ski more, you can advance faster.

Quote:
> <snip> - I'd originally thought that buying skis
> would be a bad thing to do at my current skill
> level, but now I'm not as sure, since the cost
> is a toss up either way.  Is it possible for me
> to buy something now that I'll still be happy
> with next season?

When I was a level 3, I bought used rental skies,
for $60.00. They were fine for me, and I didn't feel
bad half a season later when I another pair.  I bought
4 pairs of used rental skis, 170, 180, 190, and 200
cm, before I bought a good pair of skis, used Solomon
EXP 9100 demonstration demo's.  My current skis are
use Viper X demo's.
Quote:
> Thanks very much for any advice or suggestions!
> -nhy

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Scott Abraha » Wed, 15 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Dale Bish initiated another Bishbash:

Quote:
> 3-4??? What the hell does that mean? Are you from New York or something?
> No real skier would ever use that screwed up, rental shop rating system
> that doesn't say a damn thing about skiing.

Bish, the sheep around Tahoe inform me that you are no better than a
level 2 sheep-shtupper with a level 1 shlong.  Of course, they are
rental sheep, which is the only kind that would***you, so that
doesn't say a damn thing about sheep shtupping.

Quote:

> I smell bull shit

Wipe off your mouth.

Quote:
> What? Like are you trying to ski intermediate cruisers or something?

A fine ambition.  You should aspire to such taste.

Quote:
> rsa has no wisdom, there are just a bunch of lame people who have nothing
> better to do than to make sheep jokes, brag about their schlongs and
> torment women.

I miss the tormenting bit.  Anthea, come back!

Quote:

> And if you really want to improve, and impress your friends, subscribe to
> SKI magazine, buy a Toyota 4Runner and go to Vail.

Everybody listen up!  Bish just got a clue!
By the way, Bish, I met Mike Hattrup tonight at Booth Creek's reception
in Seattle.
He was honored to make Two Buddha's acquaintance, but he'd never heard
of you.  I might tell him about you when I ski with him on Friday, but
only if you promise to behave.

Two Buddha

Vail:  Where Bish takes his Forerunner to read Ski

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by spyr » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00



Quote:
>Dale

Dale, no offence, but have u got PMS or something?

R E L A X

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Mad Mon » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Dale Bish decided to prove that he deserves all the bashing he gets in

> this newsgroup by bashing an honest newbie asking good questions:
>    (removing a lot of good responses to Dale's diatribite)

Right on, Alan

As a newcomer to both R.S.A and skiing, I spend most of my time lurking
in this group and getting the vibe on this group. But Dale Bish's
response to a perfectly reasonable question, posted by someone hoping to
get some advice from other skiers, has brought me to the surface.

Where does Dale Bish get off pouring shit all over someone else? Is it
because he is too shallow minded to think that maybe everybody doesn't
ski to his ability? Maybe he doesn't like the idea of sharing his slopes
with anyone else (especially not a newbie).

I found his dribble a lot more offensive then sheep jokes and talk of
the Pride. In fact I would prefer to continue reading these types of
posts rather than the ***that was imposed on us by Dale. If anything
is going to affect the quality of posts and the type of people that
frequent this news group, it would be his poor and meaningless response
to Nina's questions. If Dale skis with the same attitude that he posts
to RSA with, I am glad that he is nowhere near anywhere that I ski.

I have read of Bish Bashing and thought that he probably didn't deserve
that sort of treatment, but now I have been proved wrong by his own
actions. Dale grow up and get a life. If you don't have anything useful,
funny or sheep related to say, don't say anything at all!

Finally, Nina, all the advice I can offer is ski early and ski often.
Practice and get as many lessons as you can. Hoping that you have an
excellent season and remember that not everyone at RSA thinks like Bish
does.

.....returning to the bottom of the RSA pond again

--
   ______ ____
   `----,\    )       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    `--==\\  /        The Mad Monk is stranger than fiction!
     `--==\\/

  |    \   \   _(")   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   \   /-| ||'--'     Only 9 months to go till Season 98 starts!
jgs \_\  \_\\

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Christopher D » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00

: 3-4??? What the hell does that mean? Are you from New York or something?
: No real skier would ever use that screwed up, rental shop rating system
: that doesn't say a damn thing about skiing.

Well, Bish, if you knew anything, you'd know the rental shop
ski levels only go to 3, so she is probably describing PSIA
levels.  Of course, I figure you probably just used this as
an excuse to be a schmuck and vent your spleen on a newbie,
so***off.

: I smell bull shit

Yeah, coming from your mouth.  Funny how everything smells
stronger right under your nose.

: What? Like are you trying to ski intermediate cruisers or something?

There are actually people here who don't claim to be world-
class skiiers like you claim to be.

: rsa has no wisdom, there are just a bunch of lame people who have nothing
: better to do than to make sheep jokes, brag about their schlongs and
: torment women.

Actually, RSA has some wisdom, but Bish is sort of like a big
gnarly black hole, sucking the intelligence.

Seeya!

Chris

--
Christopher B. Dye      "... TWO BLOCKS without a STARBUCKS ...

www.pixi.com/~cbdye          - Zippy  (970922)
KC7ZAM    [ENTP]        

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Dave Staffor » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Quote:
> 3-4??? What the hell does that mean? Are you from New York or
> something? No real skier would ever use that screwed up, rental shop
> rating system that doesn't say a damn thing about skiing.
> .... loads of  adolescent irrelevance deleted....

Oh dear, some has let little Dale play on the Internet again. Bad boy
Dale, it's off to bed with no supper for you, you *** boy!

Back to the ***s talking.

The boots are the most important thing to get right. And if you are at
an intermediate level, it doesn't matter so much what the boot is as long
as it fits well. If it has adjustable flex that is useful, but to be honest
you
probably wont be able to tell the difference. Just find a pair that fit
perfectly
and buy them. Doesn't matter if they are top of the range, or mid range or
cheapo specials. Ask lots of questions, and try as many pairs as you can
and allow a lot of time for trying them on. Buy new if possible.

As for skiis, buying a reasonable pair second hand is cost effective and
if you do lots of weekend trips saves a lot of faffing around hiring skiis.
Again if you are intermediate it's hard to tell the difference between
types,
but you will notice length. So *don''t* buy longer than you can handle.
Ask at a ski shop about length as it depends on ability, weight, height,
and what you want to ski (i.e. moguls, steeps, etc.)

Basically longer skiis are more stable at speed, and harder to turn.
Shorter
= easier to turn and less stable. Although this is a generalisation, for
the
majority of people it is true, and the less skilled you are the more true
it is.

Slalom skiis (Often marked with a S) are easy to turn, not so stable.
Giant Slalom (marked RS) are bit less easy to turn, a bit more stable
Racing skiis (marked R - duh!) even more stable, harder to turn.
Carving skiis are reportdly good for intermediates, but I've never skiied
them.

If you buy second hand, ensure that the edges are in good condition, the
base is flat and smooth and that the skiis are bowed i.e. when laid flat
the tips and tail should touch the ground, and the centre is off the floor.
If they
lay completely flat, or worse the tips curl upwards, they are knackered,
and avoid them like the plague.

Don't worry about a little rust on the edges, as long as they are not
severely
pitted. However, a careful owner will put grease on the edges at the end of

the season, and release the bindings.

As for poles, forget the carbon fibre, titanium, super shaped hype. Just
get
the right length. If they are too sort or too long they will really affect
your
technique.

I hope his helps,

Dave

PS Night night Dale ;-)

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by Jay Levi » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

>Dale Bish initiated another Bishbash:
>> 3-4??? What the hell does that mean? Are you from New York or something?
>> No real skier would ever use that screwed up, rental shop rating system
>> that doesn't say a damn thing about skiing.
>Bish, the sheep around Tahoe inform me that you are no better than a
>level 2 sheep-shtupper with a level 1 shlong.  Of course, they are
>rental sheep, which is the only kind that would***you, so that
>doesn't say a damn thing about sheep shtupping.

I was trying to come up with a reply to the Bishcrud,  but gave up.
This one made me laugh out loud.

Sheep jokes make this ng stand out in the crowd.

-Jay

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by M. Wild » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


> > Dale Bish decided to prove that he deserves all the bashing he gets in
> > this newsgroup by bashing an honest newbie asking good questions:
> >    (removing a lot of good responses to Dale's diatribite)

> Right on, Alan

> Dale Bish's
> response to a perfectly reasonable question, posted by someone hoping to
> get some advice from other skiers, has brought me to the surface.

> Where does Dale Bish get off pouring shit all over someone else? Is it
> because he is too shallow minded to think that maybe everybody doesn't
> ski to his ability? Maybe he doesn't like the idea of sharing his slopes
> with anyone else (especially not a newbie).

> I found his dribble a lot more offensive then sheep jokes and talk of
> the Pride.
> I have read of Bish Bashing and thought that he probably didn't deserve
> that sort of treatment, but now I have been proved wrong by his own
> actions. Dale grow up and get a life. If you don't have anything useful,
> funny or sheep related to say, don't say anything at all!

YEEEEEEEEE--HAAAAAAAAA !!!!!!!
Lurkers of r.s.a - unite and feel the power and glory of unrestrained
Bishbashing
Its more fun than ignoring Horvath
It has more social value than trashing pinnahs (note upper crust accent
simulation)

Bishmonster - I also have reading and occasionally posting for a few
years now.
Early on I was too ignorant to realize the depth and breadth of your
attitude
and arrogance so I also thought you were getting a bad rap.  Not True.
There is no rap sufficiently bad to describe you.  Others may be off
topic,
or boring content control freaks, or <self snipped>  ...

Oh well,  I have vented and feel better.

BTW   Nina,
I agree with the others Go out and ski as much as you can. Have fun,
ignore those with attitudes, and don't worry so much right now about
specific gear choices.  <enable cliche mode> After all its not the
tools, its the skill of the carpenter  <disable cliche mode>
--
Wilde  (please remove XS from address to respond)

 
 
 

Advice for a first time gear buyer

Post by david ma » Thu, 16 Oct 1997 04:00:00


: - I'd like to advance to level 6-7 by the end of the season; is this
: reasonable considering my anticipated schedule and the fact that I'm not
: the fastest learner when it comes to things that require coordination?  :)

Miles under your skiis and lessons. You can get a fair bit of
improvement in a season skiing the number of times your are.
It sounds like you have a local area to ski at. For learning,
a poor hill close to you is better than a good hill far away.
Many small places have frequent flyer type deals to give you
good breaks on tickets and lessons. As for the lessons, be
patient. You are learning muscle memory which takes time
but it does settle in, even for those of who were born
clutzes.

: - are there other boots that would be a better choice for me, in the
: collective wisdom of r.a.s?  I'm looking of course for the ultimate

If they fit you, your current boots are just fine. Worry about
lessons and miles.

: - I'd originally thought that buying skis would be a bad thing to do at my
: current skill level, but now I'm not as sure, since the cost is a toss up
: either way.  Is it possible for me to buy something now that I'll still be
: happy with next season?

I'm a big advocate of buying something... nearly anything, really..
for cheap. It is one less logistic to worry about when you
go and perhaps more importantly it will be a consistant platform
to learn on. There are hordes of intermediate to advanced
conventional skis out there; even more now that the shaped
ski train is rolling. I picked a pair of 5500s for 10 bucks
the other day. Saw plenty others with bindings for under 100.
Consider them disposable but they will serve a purpose.
It gives you *something* to work with while you look
for the perfect ski. Look for ski swaps and used gear shops
and take a knowledgable friend.

Dave Mann           | "It is impossible, or not easy, to do
                    |  noble acts without the proper equipment."