binding position & roller skis

binding position & roller skis

Post by Brian and Denise Paule » Sat, 12 Nov 2005 11:12:19


Hi,

My ski shop guy and I were talking the other day.  He said he's heard a
theory that you want to have your roller ski bindings mounted as far back as
possible on the skis without hitting the rear wheel in order to help your
balance.  Anybody have any proof, thoughts, or experience?

Brian

P.S.  Don't forget to write Mediazone for the MPEG races.

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Brian and Denise Paule » Sat, 12 Nov 2005 11:12:35

Hi,

My ski shop guy and I were talking the other day.  He said he's heard a
theory that you want to have your roller ski bindings mounted as far back as
possible on the skis without hitting the rear wheel in order to help your
balance.  Anybody have any proof, thoughts, or experience?

Brian

P.S.  Don't forget to write Mediazone for the MPEG races.

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Gene Goldenfel » Sat, 12 Nov 2005 13:03:52

I believe that's standard, given weight and length issues.  Any brand in
particular?

Gene


Quote:

> Hi,

> My ski shop guy and I were talking the other day.  He said he's heard a
> theory that you want to have your roller ski bindings mounted as far back as
> possible on the skis without hitting the rear wheel in order to help your
> balance.  Anybody have any proof, thoughts, or experience?

> Brian

> P.S.  Don't forget to write Mediazone for the MPEG races.


 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Gary Jacobso » Sat, 12 Nov 2005 13:55:12



Quote:
> Hi,

> My ski shop guy and I were talking the other day.  He said he's heard a
> theory that you want to have your roller ski bindings mounted as far back
> as possible on the skis without hitting the rear wheel in order to help
> your balance.  Anybody have any proof, thoughts, or experience?

Probably most true for classic skis, but I know some good skiers who use the
balance to determine where they are going to mount bindings. On classic
roller skis with "heavy front ends" it's usually good to go 1 to 2.5 cm
forward of mounting as far towards the rear as possible. That gives the
skier more control over the front.

Probably a safe generalization for skate roller skis too, but there was a
time that mounting bindings well forward of as far back as possible was the
way to go. But then you are getting a in-line skate effect to some degree
IMHO.

Not sure that mounting affects the skier's balance directly, but surely
where the binding is mounted affects the for/aft balance of the ski and that
means a lot in terms of tracking (especially with classic), and "hang
weight". These factors will of course impact the skier's balance as just
about anything will do. (Isn't that why skiing is so fun, and challanging?)

Gary Jacobson
Rosendale, NY where's it well time for bed

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by revya.. » Sat, 12 Nov 2005 14:51:29

from what I understand, at least for skate r.s., there is no such a
position on the shaft that woulld give an ideally balanced ski: the
rear end will always bounce down. True for all V2s at least. That's why
the compromise is to place the binging far towards the rear as possible.
 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Jim How » Sun, 13 Nov 2005 00:10:22

Finnsisu mounts the bindings on Marwe Skate forward of what the
manufacturer suggests. This seems to promote even wheel wear without
effecting balance. My old roller skis have the bindings mounted as far
back as possible and Ithe rear wheels would wear out long before the
front wheels.

Jim

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Brian and Denise Paule » Sun, 13 Nov 2005 02:44:12

Oh, sorry, it's for skate skiing on V-2 Aeros.

Brian


Quote:
>I believe that's standard, given weight and length issues.  Any brand in
> particular?

> Gene


>> Hi,

>> My ski shop guy and I were talking the other day.  He said he's heard a
>> theory that you want to have your roller ski bindings mounted as far back
>> as
>> possible on the skis without hitting the rear wheel in order to help your
>> balance.  Anybody have any proof, thoughts, or experience?

>> Brian

>> P.S.  Don't forget to write Mediazone for the MPEG races.

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Vladimi » Sun, 13 Nov 2005 05:36:38

For classic rollerskis

I should  warn not to mount bindigs on classic roller skis too far back
if the wheelbase of the ski is unusually large. In my experience
mounting bindings at balance point on classic roller skis (if it is
possible at all, which actually is for Marwe classic) is the worst case
(just the opposite to skis). That is because when you lift your foot,
the whole roller ski lifts to the air with both wheels and it becomes
hard to place it back in line with direction of your move. It is quite
a scary feeling. In my opinion the rear wheel should roll on the ground
when the foot lifts. If the wheelbase is large enough, it would be
possible to place the binding even farther back, but imho letting the
front wheel roll instead of rear one would not be as stable and safe.
That is, for classic roller skis, bindings should be mounted somewhat
ahead of balance point. Don't know how much - maybe 1cm is enough. You
can test the position by attaching the bindings (in closed position
with installed boots on them) with duct tape.
For most roller skis with shorter wheelbase (and big enough boots)
balance point is always behind, so it is safe to shift bindings as far
back as possible.

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Gary Jacobso » Sun, 13 Nov 2005 12:59:10


Quote:
> For classic rollerskis

> I should  warn not to mount bindigs on classic roller skis too far back
> if the wheelbase of the ski is unusually large. In my experience
> mounting bindings at balance point on classic roller skis (if it is
> possible at all, which actually is for Marwe classic) is the worst case
> (just the opposite to skis). That is because when you lift your foot,
> the whole roller ski lifts to the air with both wheels and it becomes
> hard to place it back in line with direction of your move. It is quite
> a scary feeling. In my opinion the rear wheel should roll on the ground
> when the foot lifts.

I think quite the opposite. It is the front wheel that should remain in
contact with the ground to help with tracking. Rear wheel will often raise
off the pavement at end of kick.

If the wheelbase is large enough, it would be

Quote:
> possible to place the binding even farther back, but imho letting the
> front wheel roll instead of rear one would not be as stable and safe.
> That is, for classic roller skis, bindings should be mounted somewhat
> ahead of balance point. Don't know how much - maybe 1cm is enough. You
> can test the position by attaching the bindings (in closed position
> with installed boots on them) with duct tape.
> For most roller skis with shorter wheelbase (and big enough boots)
> balance point is always behind, so it is safe to shift bindings as far
> back as possible.

I wonder if you classic roller ski as some do around here-"duck stepping"-
where they lift the ski as it is brought forward and then settle onto it
once the foot is a bit forward of the kicking foot. It is an exageration of
weight transfer that prevents and early landing of ski behind the foot that
is kicking. (On snow early landing leads to "slapping".) I don't think, but
am not 100% sure, that "slapping" is necessarily a big deal as long as the
ski continues to accelerate or at least not lose speed once it is placed
down. That said I wondered today as I roller skied if all the horrible toe
could have been avoided if I had "duck stepped".

Gary Jacobson
Rosendale, NY

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Vladimi » Mon, 14 Nov 2005 00:29:35

Gary

It seems to me that the way one ski on roller ski has not as much
connection with safety and ability to keep forward direction of the ski
roller compared to binding placement and i believe that letting the
rear wheel roll instead of the front one is much safer (when the front
wheel rolls, there is a danger to lift the foot too high which could
lead to stumbling and falling) and much easier to place the roller ski
back to the ground moving straight forward. I skied with the binding at
the balance point and 1 cm ahead and the second appeared much better. I
also tried a back position of the binding (attached with duct tape) at
home but it felt much less comfortable than the forward position.

As for my ski style on roller skis I have not much to say. Last time I
rolled was quite a time ago and it was mainly double poling.

Vladimir

P.S. I want to correct myself. The first phrase in my first article
should sound "I should warn against mounting ..." Still learning
English.

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by Gene Goldenfel » Mon, 14 Nov 2005 09:28:30

Sounds like you are talking about striding.  My problem with anything but the Marwe combis + classic wheel with my long legs is the front wheel comes off the ground.  Combined with a a little hip turnout, it can get pretty scary without adjusting my style.  As for skating, I'm not sure why either wheel stays down, but the heel would definitely leave last and, I suppose, land first.  That aside, I thought Len advised mounting bindings all the way back on his rollerskis, classic and skate.

Gene

On Sat, 12 Nov 2005 03:59:10 GMT

Quote:



> > For classic rollerskis

> > I should  warn not to mount bindigs on classic roller skis too far back
> > if the wheelbase of the ski is unusually large. In my experience
> > mounting bindings at balance point on classic roller skis (if it is
> > possible at all, which actually is for Marwe classic) is the worst case
> > (just the opposite to skis). That is because when you lift your foot,
> > the whole roller ski lifts to the air with both wheels and it becomes
> > hard to place it back in line with direction of your move. It is quite
> > a scary feeling. In my opinion the rear wheel should roll on the ground
> > when the foot lifts.

> I think quite the opposite. It is the front wheel that should remain in
> contact with the ground to help with tracking. Rear wheel will often raise
> off the pavement at end of kick.

> If the wheelbase is large enough, it would be
> > possible to place the binding even farther back, but imho letting the
> > front wheel roll instead of rear one would not be as stable and safe.
> > That is, for classic roller skis, bindings should be mounted somewhat
> > ahead of balance point. Don't know how much - maybe 1cm is enough. You
> > can test the position by attaching the bindings (in closed position
> > with installed boots on them) with duct tape.
> > For most roller skis with shorter wheelbase (and big enough boots)
> > balance point is always behind, so it is safe to shift bindings as far
> > back as possible.

> I wonder if you classic roller ski as some do around here-"duck stepping"-
> where they lift the ski as it is brought forward and then settle onto it
> once the foot is a bit forward of the kicking foot. It is an exageration of
> weight transfer that prevents and early landing of ski behind the foot that
> is kicking. (On snow early landing leads to "slapping".) I don't think, but
> am not 100% sure, that "slapping" is necessarily a big deal as long as the
> ski continues to accelerate or at least not lose speed once it is placed
> down. That said I wondered today as I roller skied if all the horrible toe
> could have been avoided if I had "duck stepped".

> Gary Jacobson
> Rosendale, NY

 
 
 

binding position & roller skis

Post by rjjkkbla.. » Wed, 16 Nov 2005 07:50:09

Len (of V2-Jenex) seems to have changed the recommended mounting
position forward about an inch and a quarter, as I recollect. This may
be to make room for his optional brake.  I noted that my new Aero
shafts were also about that much longer than my old first generation
(riveted) shafts.

This newer setup feels more stable to me, but that may also be due to
using newer boots.  I love the brake, but it did make the front-back
balance worse, inspite of using the lighter 125 wheels on the back.  To
compensate, I used a trick suggested by Sten Fjeldheim (NMU coach).  I
tied a piece of 1/8" shock cord to the brake pivot bolt, and then tie
that loosely around the front of the boot.  It keeps the rear wheel
from*** down too much on recovery.  This is for my skate skis.

I have been thinking about trying 125 wheels on the rear of my Aero CS
combi skis I use for classic, to lighten the rear end to make them
balance better, but you've given me pause.
If I ever get around to trying it I'll let you know my impressions.

Randy