Equipment Purchases? Don't make these mistakes!

Equipment Purchases? Don't make these mistakes!

Post by Steve.Steven » Fri, 03 Mar 1995 13:26:59


Most people buy boots that are too big, and skis that are too short.

Unfortunately, it is the !!!EXACT!!! opposite of what they should have
done.

---SKIS---

Buy skis that are LONG!!!!! You will be a better skier sooner on skis that
are long enough for you. Skis don't know how tall you are. Weight is FAR
more important than height in length determination; though many shops
will tell you to buy skis that are equal to your height. Nonsense.

Also, a longer ski is FAR more versatile. It can be tuned to behave like
any kind of ski you want. Like the bumps? Buy long. Like the steeps?
Buy long. Like to go fast? Buy long. Get it? Longer is BETTER. Always.

A 204 can be tuned to blow the doors off of ANY 190 or 195 in the
bumps. On the flats, there is no contest. The longer ski will FLY past
that intermediate on the 190's. He'll still be an intermediate in 2 years,
and you'll be thrashing on Superstar this season! Buy long. I cannot
stress it strongly enough. You can't do anything to a 195 that will
bring it up to the capability of a 204. Same skier, better skier.

You won't be sorry. If you felt unsure and needed to ask, then trust
the advice of people who KNOW!! Buy long, buy long, buy long. ALWAYS.
Your situation/ability is NOT an exception. Whatever you were going to
buy, get the next longer length. You'll thank me.

---BOOTS---

Buy boots that are SNUG!!! Under NO circumstances should they feel
comfortable in the ski shop. If you can tolerate having boots on your
feet for more than a few minutes (at first) then they are WRONG for YOU!!

Boot liners will bed down, yielding a SUBSTANTIALLY different feel than
when you purchased them. Plan for it, and wear THIN, THIN ski socks to
the shop for fitting. If you're trying boots with thicker than a dress sock,
then you WILL buy a bigger size than you should have. THIN socks are a
must, and many shops dont even carry them. Wear dress socks then.
Women, try boots on with pantyhose-clad feet. You won't be sorry when
your boots have broken in, and your feet feel spectacular run-after-run.

Contrary to popular belief, MUCH more boot-fitting can be done to a snug-
fitting boot than to a loose, sloppy boot that felt right with huge woolen
socks,
and 70+ degree shop temps. Buy small. I know it sounds opposite of how you
buy street shoes, but it's the secret to a well-fitting comfortable boot on the
slopes.

It's too bad how often people make these mistakes. Over and over.

Steve Stevens

 
 
 

Equipment Purchases? Don't make these mistakes!

Post by Karl Luba » Sat, 04 Mar 1995 05:57:01

: Also, a longer ski is FAR more versatile. It can be tuned to behave like
: any kind of ski you want. Like the bumps? Buy long. Like the steeps?
: Buy long. Like to go fast? Buy long. Get it? Longer is BETTER. Always.

Longer is not alway better.  There are more factors to consider than just
the height of a person.  There is weight, age, ability, what kind of
terrain you ski.  If you take someone that is not aggressive and and
intermediate skier and put them on a ski 6-8" over their head, they might
have some problems.  Especially if they are buying cheaper skies. Or if
you take someone 6'5" and 165 pounds they might not be as fast as they
could be on a shorter ski.  I would say that overall size and ability
should be what you look at and not just height.

The best bet is to find a shop that you trust and stay with it.  Screw
shopping around for price until you know what you want.

Karl

 
 
 

Equipment Purchases? Don't make these mistakes!

Post by John Sul » Sat, 04 Mar 1995 06:42:29

Quote:

> Most people buy boots that are too big, and skis that are too short.

> Unfortunately, it is the !!!EXACT!!! opposite of what they should have
> done.

Geez, I've made both of these mistakes.  I made the mistake with the boots
twice!

One other mistake -- rear entry boots.  Don't buy rear entry boots.

--
John Sully
Silicon Graphics, Inc.
2011 N. Shoreline MS 1L-945
Mountain View, CA
(415) 390-3291 (3-3291)