First XC ski purchase

First XC ski purchase

Post by Sam Alis » Sat, 13 Dec 2003 17:59:20


Hi all, I'm hoping to get a few pointers on some good types of waxless
classic skis both for general skiing both on groomed trails, and
getting around in unprepared stuff. I'm thinking something light
touring, but I don't have much of an idea of flex etc. I'm 6'3" and
about 175, currently residing in the Czech republic - so unfortunately
don't have much access to friendly and knowledgable XC stores. The
times I've XC skiied before, I've been more than a little unnerved
from the lack of control on downhills (I've done quite a lot of alpine
skiing in the past), admiitedly I was on old and ill fitted equipment
though. I gather such things as light touring skis with metal edges
are available, and these improve DH control a lot, particularly with
modern bindings and boots. Will such a set up drastically slow me down
if I'm skiing with people on racier equipment?

Many thanks for all and any advice,

Sam

 
 
 

First XC ski purchase

Post by Chris Cli » Sat, 13 Dec 2003 23:56:54

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Hi Sam-
Your assumption is correct that "new gear gives you better control" compared to old, ill-fitted equipment.  Several boot manufacturers (Alpina, Solomon) make some nice "backcountry" touring boots with beefier soles, higher and more substantial uppers, and a wider boot-binding interface.  And waxless skis with metal edges are also relatively easy to come by.  This equipment will allow you to tour just about anywhere off-track in moderate terrain (would be pretty challenging on alpine-pitch slopes).  However, you will most definitely pay a price in speed and lightness on a groomed track.  Lighter, generally narrower skis and bindings; and lighter, less substantial boots are needed on the tracks, and the pay-off is that easy kick-and-glide stride that allows you to eat up the kilometers (versus shuffling along in your bomber gear).

Because (darn! not again!) you can't have everything, you'll have to make some choices.  What I would do is apply the "80-20" rule:  what will you be doing 80% of the time?  If your're going to be on tracks 80% of the time, definitely go with narrower gear-- you will mostly be on the appropriate gear.  And for that other 20% of the time, you would be amazed at what you can hack around on in track gear as long as you don't mind wallowing a bit through deep snow, and as long as linked turns aren't a big issue.  And in the spring, when the snow crusts over: viola!  "groomed" terrain as far as the eye can see! (pay attention to the notes of rapture that appear in this news group in the spring when we all start doing "crust-ski" skating tours ;- )

good luck, happy tracks!
Chris

Hi all, I'm hoping to get a few pointers on some good types of waxless
classic skis both for general skiing both on groomed trails, and
getting around in unprepared stuff. I'm thinking something light
touring, but I don't have much of an idea of flex etc. I'm 6'3" and
about 175, currently residing in the Czech republic - so unfortunately
don't have much access to friendly and knowledgable XC stores. The
times I've XC skiied before, I've been more than a little unnerved
from the lack of control on downhills (I've done quite a lot of alpine
skiing in the past), admiitedly I was on old and ill fitted equipment
though. I gather such things as light touring skis with metal edges
are available, and these improve DH control a lot, particularly with
modern bindings and boots. Will such a set up drastically slow me down
if I'm skiing with people on racier equipment?

Many thanks for all and any advice,

Sam

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--0-632186569-1071240819=:96490
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<DIV>Hi Sam-</DIV>
<DIV>Your assumption is correct that "new gear gives you better control" compared to old, ill-fitted equipment.? Several boot manufacturers (Alpina, Solomon) make some nice "backcountry" touring?boots with beefier soles, higher and more substantial uppers, and a wider boot-binding interface.??And waxless skis with metal edges are also relatively easy to come by.? This equipment will?allow you to?tour just about anywhere off-track in moderate terrain (would be pretty challenging on alpine-pitch slopes).? However,?you will most definitely pay a price in speed and lightness on a groomed track.? Lighter, generally narrower skis and bindings; and lighter, less substantial boots are needed on the tracks, and the pay-off is that easy kick-and-glide stride that allows you to eat up the kilometers (versus shuffling along in your bomber gear).</DIV>
<DIV>?</DIV>
<DIV>Because (darn! not again!) you can't have everything, you'll have to make some choices.? What I would do is apply the "80-20" rule:? what will you be doing 80% of the time?? If your're going to be on tracks 80% of the time, definitely go with narrower gear-- you will mostly be on the appropriate gear.? And for that other 20% of the time, you would be amazed at what you can hack around on in track gear as long as you don't mind wallowing a bit through deep snow, and as long as linked turns aren't a big issue.? And in the spring, when the snow crusts over: viola!? "groomed" terrain as far as the eye can see! (pay attention to the notes of rapture that appear in this news group in the spring when we all start doing "crust-ski" skating tours ;- )</DIV>
<DIV>?</DIV>
<DIV>good luck, happy tracks!</DIV>
<DIV>Chris</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">Hi all, I'm hoping to get a few pointers on some good types of waxless<BR>classic skis both for general skiing both on groomed trails, and<BR>getting around in unprepared stuff. I'm thinking something light<BR>touring, but I don't have much of an idea of flex etc. I'm 6'3" and<BR>about 175, currently residing in the Czech republic - so unfortunately<BR>don't have much access to friendly and knowledgable XC stores. The<BR>times I've XC skiied before, I've been more than a little unnerved<BR>from the lack of control on downhills (I've done quite a lot of alpine<BR>skiing in the past), admiitedly I was on old and ill fitted equipment<BR>though. I gather such things as light touring skis with metal edges<BR>are available, and these improve DH control a lot, particularly with<BR>modern bindings and boots. Will such a set up drastically slow me down<BR>if I'm skiing with people on !
racier
 equipment?<BR><BR>Many thanks for all and any advice,<BR><BR>Sam<BR><BR><BR><BR></BLOCKQUOTE><p><hr SIZE=1>
Do you Yahoo!?<br>
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First XC ski purchase

Post by Ben Kaufma » Sun, 14 Dec 2003 06:18:24


Quote:
>Hi all, I'm hoping to get a few pointers on some good types of waxless
>classic skis both for general skiing both on groomed trails, and
>getting around in unprepared stuff. I'm thinking something light
>touring, but I don't have much of an idea of flex etc. I'm 6'3" and
>about 175, currently residing in the Czech republic - so unfortunately
>don't have much access to friendly and knowledgable XC stores. The
>times I've XC skiied before, I've been more than a little unnerved
>from the lack of control on downhills (I've done quite a lot of alpine
>skiing in the past), admiitedly I was on old and ill fitted equipment
>though. I gather such things as light touring skis with metal edges
>are available, and these improve DH control a lot, particularly with
>modern bindings and boots. Will such a set up drastically slow me down
>if I'm skiing with people on racier equipment?

>Many thanks for all and any advice,

>Sam

I don't think they are considered light XC touring once they've got metal edges.

Are you an athletic person?   Are you looking to do 1 - 2 hour hard workouts or
day long events.  Are the groomed trails hard packed and/or with tracks? What
percentage do you think would be groomed versus ungroomed.

You probably will be significantly slower than someone on race equipment, and
for two reasons.  First, chances are the person on race equipment knows how to
XC ski well. Second,  it's higher performance gear (probably waxed) and will
have better superior glide and grip.  

Ben

 
 
 

First XC ski purchase

Post by David Dermot » Sun, 14 Dec 2003 22:43:53


Quote:
> Hi all, I'm hoping to get a few pointers on some good types of waxless
> classic skis both for general skiing both on groomed trails, and
> getting around in unprepared stuff. I'm thinking something light
> touring, but I don't have much of an idea of flex etc. I'm 6'3" and
> about 175, currently residing in the Czech republic - so unfortunately
> don't have much access to friendly and knowledgable XC stores. The
> times I've XC skiied before, I've been more than a little unnerved
> from the lack of control on downhills (I've done quite a lot of alpine
> skiing in the past), admiitedly I was on old and ill fitted equipment
> though. I gather such things as light touring skis with metal edges
> are available, and these improve DH control a lot, particularly with
> modern bindings and boots. Will such a set up drastically slow me down
> if I'm skiing with people on racier equipment?

   I'm very pleased with my new Madhus Voss "backcountry" skis,
They are light enough and narrow enough to use in groomed trails
but also work well in ungroomed snow. The ones I have are waxable,
but they also available in waxless (my experience with waxless skis
is that they are much slower in most conditions).

  Profile : 60mm - 50 mm - 55mm , weight 1.7 kg, thin steel edge

  I use NNN-2 bindings with touring boots, but you might want to
try NNN-BC or SNS-BC boots/bindings. Some of the newer BC boots are
fairly light.

  One reason I mention them is that they are made in Czech republic,
even though Madhus head office is in Norway. Of course, that doesn't
mean that you can actually BUY them in the Czech republic! They are
probably all shipped back to head office in Norway and distributed
from there!  
--

 David Dermott , Wolfville Ridge, Nova Scotia, Canada

 WWW pages: http://www3.ns.sympatico.ca/dermott/

 
 
 

First XC ski purchase

Post by Sam Alis » Fri, 19 Dec 2003 00:36:58

Dear all,

Many thanks for your pointers.

I am quite a fit person being primarily a mountain bike racer. So it
sounds like from what I've heard some light touring waxless skis
without metal edges might fit my current needs. I won't be skiing with
any highly accomplished XC skiers, so I think I should do alright
keeping up, I just wanted to try and find the right balance between
speed and control.

Will keep you updated on my progress, thanks again,

Sam