cold thumb and a hard first outing

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Charlotte DeMot » Tue, 01 Feb 2000 04:00:00


Hi,

I saw a subject line on the "cold thumb" topic a few weeks
ago and thought it was posted in one of these two
newsgroups, but have not been able to find it on deja.
Could someone be so kind as to offer me a recap?

I ask because we took our 5 year old daughter out for her
first XC ski trip this weekend, and her freezing cold thumbs
made her miserable, so we cut the trip very short.  Both
kids (2 year old son rode in the Kelty carrier on dad's
back) were dressed quite warmly:  feet had liners and thick
wool socks, each wore long johns (top and bottom), t-necks,
fleece pants, bib overall snowsuits, and Lands' End squall
jackets (the 5 YO actually has the squall parka), head wear
was a fleece balaclava and fleece pilot-style hat on the 2
YO, 5 YO had a fleece hat, plus the hood to her jacket.  5
YO daughter also had gaitors.  Frankly, I'd have been
roasting.  They each had on a pair of fleece-lined mittens
w/ a layer of thinsulate and a windbreaker outer covering.
It was only about 19F outside w/ overcast skies, but no wind
in the trees (I didn't realize it was that cold until we got
back).  Even before we could get started, my daughter said
her hands were cold (they were).  So we put on some liner
gloves under the mittens.  5 minutes later, she's still
miserable, so I put one of those little hand warmers in each
mitten.  She stops complaining about her fingers, but her
thumbs are still like ice cubes.  As it was her first time
out, there was a fair amount of falling and crossing skis,
so we were never able to get her moving long enough to
really warm up.  After about 20 minutes, we did the only
logical thing and called it a day, hoping that we haven't
turned her off to the sport on her first try.

On a brighter note, she figured out the skiing stuff right
away, even heeding my advice to bend her knees and lean
forward when going "down hill" (really just over little
bumps in the nearly flat trail).  Plus she enjoyed seeing
the rabbit tracks in the snow.  She says she liked the
skiing, but not being cold, and wants to try it again in
warmer weather.  We did get her a new pair of mittens, as we
realized that the insulation in the thumb had worn very
thin.  Plus I think we'll start off with both the liner
gloves and mittens next time, and let her shed the liners
when she's ready.  It was pretty frustrating for her dad and
me, as we felt like we'd done everything we could/should to
keep them warm, plus paid a pretty price for 20 minutes of
skiing on the groomed trails (a beginner's luxery, we
figured).  Well, better luck next time I guess.

C***te
--

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Darrell Rike » Tue, 01 Feb 2000 04:00:00

  Dear C***te,

  Were your childs hands cold before you set out? It's harder for your
extremities (feet, hands, etc.) to warm up in the cold if they start out
cold. Also having waterproof mitts is a good idea. Kids fall a lot and
play in the snow. If they get wet, they get cold.

  For you older kids looking to improve....Rob Bradlee hits the nail on
the head with:

Quote:
>Remember, it's not a sport, it's a lifestyle.

  Great advice, as usual from Rob.

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Charlotte DeMot » Wed, 02 Feb 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>   Dear C***te,

>   Were your childs hands cold before you set out? It's harder for your
> extremities (feet, hands, etc.) to warm up in the cold if they start out
> cold. Also having waterproof mitts is a good idea. Kids fall a lot and
> play in the snow. If they get wet, they get cold.

I think they got cold as we were getting skis on, etc.  I seem to remember
being surprised that I had to tell her to get her mittens on when she got
out of the car.  Like I say, I'll make sure she has the liners AND mittens
on before opening the car door next time!

c.

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by 72451.7.. » Thu, 03 Feb 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
> back).  Even before we could get started, my daughter said
> her hands were cold (they were).  So we put on some liner
> gloves under the mittens.  5 minutes later, she's still
> miserable, so I put one of those little hand warmers in each
> mitten.  She stops complaining about her fingers, but her
> thumbs are still like ice cubes.  As it was her first time

A number of things to do/try.

First, make sure she has had a good meal, including some longer burning
proteins before going out.

You mentioned she was cold at the start - that is hard to overcome,
particularly, as you noted, she was not doing a lot of work learing and
was not going to generate heat or not much heat after the start.

I would ditch any "glove" liners and use only another mitten for a
liner.  I have been a mitten advocate for many years.  Having each
finger in close proximity to others helps share the heat.  Actually,
after a chilling lunch stop, I may actually shift my thumb out of the
mitten thumb pocket and kind of wrap my warmer fingers around it - makes
for awkward poling for a while (and probably harder for small
fingers/hands) but generally helps the thumb warm.

Then there are windmills - place the arms at the side and then start
rotating up over the head and then back down by rotating the arms.
Don't throw out the shoulders though.  Rapid windmills can drive ***
to the hands and fingers.

And then there is the old - hands in the arm pits which are generally
warm.

All kinds of tricks.

I hope it all works out - great activity to learn young.  Wish my
parents had take me skiing WAY BACK WHEN! (G)  But I guess I have seen
some miserable children and parents out there NOT enjoying it at all -
too much pressure.

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Charlotte DeMot » Thu, 03 Feb 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> A number of things to do/try.

> First, make sure she has had a good meal, including some longer burning
> proteins before going out.

I had them eat as many PB crackers as they could about 30 minutes before we
started out, but that was already late in the morning, and they didn't eat
as many I was hoping.  Next time I'll make it pepperoni--she loves the
stuff!

Quote:
> You mentioned she was cold at the start - that is hard to overcome,
> particularly, as you noted, she was not doing a lot of work learing and
> was not going to generate heat or not much heat after the start.

I think this is what really did us in.  Can't remember if I mentioned that
through either e***ment or nervousness she got out of the car without her
mittens on, so we really started out at a disadvantage.  At least she has
some basis for having fun in cold weather before this.  We took them to a
10,000 ft. pass for sledding a few weeks earlier and they had a great
time.  And weren't cold!  Plus they're always outside whenever it snows
down here (Fort Collins, CO).

Quote:
> I would ditch any "glove" liners and use only another mitten for a
> liner.  I have been a mitten advocate for many years.  Having each
> finger in close proximity to others helps share the heat.  Actually,
> after a chilling lunch stop, I may actually shift my thumb out of the
> mitten thumb pocket and kind of wrap my warmer fingers around it - makes
> for awkward poling for a while (and probably harder for small
> fingers/hands) but generally helps the thumb warm.

Will keep this one in mind.

Quote:
> Then there are windmills - place the arms at the side and then start
> rotating up over the head and then back down by rotating the arms.
> Don't throw out the shoulders though.  Rapid windmills can drive ***
> to the hands and fingers.

This is one of my favorite quick hand warm ups.  She tried some with
limited success, but probably not fast enough, as they made her lose her
balance.  Sigh...

Quote:
> And then there is the old - hands in the arm pits which are generally
> warm.

Ha ha!  Another standby of my family.  I can remember my mom holding my
sister's frozen feet under her arms after one XC trip when she (sister) was
about 5-6 years old.  And that's exactly what I did with my daugher's hands
when we got to the warming hut for lunch.  Warmed her up in less than 5
minutes, but by that point she'd had enough skiing for one day.

Quote:
> All kinds of tricks.

> I hope it all works out - great activity to learn young.  Wish my
> parents had take me skiing WAY BACK WHEN! (G)  But I guess I have seen
> some miserable children and parents out there NOT enjoying it at all -
> too much pressure.

Yeah, as much as I wanted to go out and do some more that day, I figured my
chances of taking her out many more times in the future would be greater if
we said "We'll try again another day."  So on the next weekend with temps
at least in the high 20's, you know where we'll be!

Thanks again for all of your pointers.

C***te

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Den Fo » Thu, 03 Feb 2000 04:00:00

C***te,

I frequently suffer from cold fingers and thumbs when I wear my gloves too
tight.  Maybe, by giving the child liner gloves and then filling her mitts
with hand warmers you restricted circulation to her pinkies??

Den

SNIP......we took our 5 year old daughter out for her

Quote:
> first XC ski trip this weekend, and her freezing cold thumbs
> made her miserable, .........SNIP........... a pair of fleece-lined
mittens
> w/ a layer of thinsulate and a windbreaker outer covering.

.......SNIP........... we put on some liner
Quote:
> gloves under the mittens.  5 minutes later, she's still
> miserable, so I put one of those little hand warmers in each
> mitten.  She stops complaining about her fingers, but her
> thumbs are still like ice cubes........SNIP

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Mel Man » Thu, 03 Feb 2000 04:00:00

I have been skiing with my kds since they were three (now 11 & "four***
going on I'm a grown up you don't need to tell me what to do") and have
learned a few trickss along the way.

It sounds like you learned one important lesson alredy.  Don't let them
get cold or wet before you start.  Kids have a harded time warming up
than ***s.  Their body has more surface area to volume and they don't
generate heat as easily.  It's important to have your stuff together and
get going as soon as possible.  It's nice to have a pretty good apln for
what's going to happen when you start ie. no repacking, adjusting
bindings waxing etc.  It's also nice to have an *** to help each kid
get set.  Playing in the snow is best saved for later since they almost
always get snow in their mitts and clothes.

It's almost impossible to find kids mittens that are warm enough.  For
one thing to get enough insulation in the thumb it would have to be
huge.  I had mine ski without poles and they can wear small ***
mittens with their thumbs inside the main part. Pus it makes them better
skiers.

I took a plastic tobogan with a sheet of plastic pop riveted to it for a
cover. If they got tired or cold or at lunch I put'em in the sled in a
sleeping bag.  They also love to sled down hills that are to steep for
them to ski.

Taking a friend helps, especially if the freind is a go-for-it type.
They tend to feed on eachothers enthusiasm.

Take some ski trips on your own so you don't have to meet your ski need
on the kid's trip.  That way you can do what's best for them without
feeling resentment.

Finally a personal note: chocolate can't cure lifes many ills but it can
leave you with a better taste in your mouth about the whole thing.  We
didn't give out much candy at home so getting it on ski trips was really
special.

Have fun they grow up fast.  Mine are already independent but i'm
teaching the 14 y.o. ti telemark which is fun,
Mel

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Richard G. Mitchell, Jr » Fri, 04 Feb 2000 04:00:00

C***te:  You did a great job or preparation and dress indeed.
To add to the other posters' advice, consider another item or
two.

Hydration is more important than carbohydrates and certainly more
than protein for providing warmth to extremities.  *** volume
most be maximized.  A thermos of hot cider or peach Jell-O and a
warm thermos cup to hold while drinking helps lots.  Twirling the
hands and arms merely drives *** to the extremities, it does
not improve circulation.  Hands in the pits (anyone's pits) does
a much better job.  Our daughter started skiing at 5 (now 8 and
goes backcountry skiing just fine) using socks instead of
fingered gloves or mittens on her hands.  Clumsy but definitely
kept all the fingers together.  For very cold conditions I
personally use a vapor barrier liner glove inside mittens --
those ***oid ones at the pharmacy.  They add a good deal of
heat but friends always wonder that the *** gloves are for.  I
just act mysterious and tell them they will only be used on
others "if necessary."

Keep up the good work.  We did our first overnight on the evening
of the Solstice moon.  What a treat.

Cheers,

Rich

Quote:

> Hi,

> I saw a subject line on the "cold thumb" topic a few weeks
> ago and thought it was posted in one of these two
> newsgroups, but have not been able to find it on deja.
> Could someone be so kind as to offer me a recap?

> I ask because we took our 5 year old daughter out for her
> first XC ski trip this weekend, and her freezing cold thumbs
> made her miserable, so we cut the trip very short.  Both
> kids (2 year old son rode in the Kelty carrier on dad's
> back) were dressed quite warmly:  feet had liners and thick
> wool socks, each wore long johns (top and bottom), t-necks,
> fleece pants, bib overall snowsuits, and Lands' End squall
> jackets (the 5 YO actually has the squall parka), head wear
> was a fleece balaclava and fleece pilot-style hat on the 2
> YO, 5 YO had a fleece hat, plus the hood to her jacket.  5
> YO daughter also had gaitors.  Frankly, I'd have been
> roasting.  They each had on a pair of fleece-lined mittens
> w/ a layer of thinsulate and a windbreaker outer covering.
> It was only about 19F outside w/ overcast skies, but no wind
> in the trees (I didn't realize it was that cold until we got
> back).  Even before we could get started, my daughter said
> her hands were cold (they were).  So we put on some liner
> gloves under the mittens.  5 minutes later, she's still
> miserable, so I put one of those little hand warmers in each
> mitten.  She stops complaining about her fingers, but her
> thumbs are still like ice cubes.  As it was her first time
> out, there was a fair amount of falling and crossing skis,
> so we were never able to get her moving long enough to
> really warm up.  After about 20 minutes, we did the only
> logical thing and called it a day, hoping that we haven't
> turned her off to the sport on her first try.

> On a brighter note, she figured out the skiing stuff right
> away, even heeding my advice to bend her knees and lean
> forward when going "down hill" (really just over little
> bumps in the nearly flat trail).  Plus she enjoyed seeing
> the rabbit tracks in the snow.  She says she liked the
> skiing, but not being cold, and wants to try it again in
> warmer weather.  We did get her a new pair of mittens, as we
> realized that the insulation in the thumb had worn very
> thin.  Plus I think we'll start off with both the liner
> gloves and mittens next time, and let her shed the liners
> when she's ready.  It was pretty frustrating for her dad and
> me, as we felt like we'd done everything we could/should to
> keep them warm, plus paid a pretty price for 20 minutes of
> skiing on the groomed trails (a beginner's luxery, we
> figured).  Well, better luck next time I guess.

> C***te
> --

--
Richard G. Mitchell, Jr.
Oregon State University
Department of Sociology
Corvallis, OR 97331
(541) 752-1323 phone/fax

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by david ma » Fri, 04 Feb 2000 04:00:00

: I ask because we took our 5 year old daughter out for her
: first XC ski trip this weekend, and her freezing cold thumbs
: made her miserable, so we cut the trip very short.  Both

I'm unimpressed with available handwear for young children.

My impression is that ill fitting elastic at the ***
of the handwear (and jackets) conspire to cut off circulation
in the hands.  One book on taking kids out in the wilds
suggests using *** mitten or heavy wool socks and putting
them on OVER the jacket, attaching them with a saftey pin
so they don't fall off.  The trade off we've encountered
with this approach is greater frustration on my daughter's
part at not being able to pick things up.  But, her hands
are warmer, I think. (repeat, I think.... very hard to know).

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Jason Carte » Fri, 04 Feb 2000 04:00:00

C***te,

I wanted to reply to your original message but hadn't the time.  I've been
grappling with my headspace about getting my own kids skiing. Over the last
5 years of going to as many Jackrabbit sessions as I can, I still make
mistakes, but have learned a lot of tips, some of which may help you.

(I apologize for the overly aggressive "know it all" tone here - I just
don't have a lot of time at the moment to word this correctly.  As well,
after re-reading this, it's obvious that much of this you have already found
out.  But I still want to post it as I somehow need to get it 'down on
paper'.)

First, the headspace.  Parents just cannot ski like we did BK.  If the kid
is small, we might get an odd 30 km in with the kid in a good PULK (or a
bike carrier mounted on skis).  But once the kid is 4 or 5, he or she won't
be too patient or will want to ski herself.  The PULK is then a support
vehicle for emergencies.

(For the group, DO NOT use a SNUGGLY or chest mounted baby carrier.  You
WILL fall and crush the kid.  I have serious doubts about kid backpacks as
they raise the parent's center of gravity and have the terrible risk of
flinging the kid out during a fall.  Buy or make a PULK.)

Second, find a Jackrabbits or Bill Koch group and become a super active
parent or leader yourself.  The word, in every country world wide, and for
any kid sport, is FUN, FUN, FUN.

Often I find that a Jackrabbit kid who says he or she is cold is really
saying that I'm a poor leader - and I know at the time it's true.  If the
program lags, or the kids are not ready for a 'tour', then their first
complaint is often "I'm cold".  Once that happens, (assuming the kid is
dressed well) the leader has one or two chaces to up the ante by getting
into a fun game or activity right away.  But if it doesn't work, it's
quitting time - tears will follow quickly.

Games, relays, songs, exercises, goofing around - whatever.  Parents can
create this atmosphere with their family - but chances are better for fun
when there's a group of kids.

Third, can the gloves ( as "7.... of skis" said) - period.  Gloves inside
mitts have never worked up here in Winnipeg (read -20 to -30 C).  Leather
work mitts over top of liner thick fleece or wool mitts work.  Fleece lined
nylon mitts (ie. REI) are not bad, but my kids still find them inadequate
for the really cold days.

Fourth, can the HOT SHOTS or chemical warmer packages.  They don't even work
for snowmobilers.

Fifth, can the POLES. Kids like poles because they see their parents using
them.  SO GET RID OF YOUR POLES, TOO.  Or at least start with them and get
rid of them 5 minutes later.

One of our best local skiers, Swedish decent I believe, did not have poles
until age 13!

Sixth, forget the big trips - one hour drive max.  Take off mitts and boots
in the car as they get wet with condensation.  Significant experiences with
your kids can and will occur on the local golf course or school yard - as
long as the kids have FUN. After several (ie a whole season) of these
outings, then go a little farther afield.

Seventh, time on snow with skis is max one hour for 4 and under.  Maybe 75
minutes if the 5 year old bonds with the Jackrabbit leader.  Even so, we had
to work up to one hour over at least one season.

Eighth, a fun, warm up chalet is a must.  A car alone just doesn't cut it
with kids, or with parents as the kids go wild - they need somewhere else to
go and eat and play (usually while the parents trade off for a 30 to 45
minute boot around the trails.)

Ninth, can the long skis - up to the kids head at max, probably to her nose
is better.  This means buy PELTONEN SNOW PARTY or KAHRU TRAC.  (There's a
decent thread with sites mentioned on this two or three weeks ago - "KAHRU &
KIDS" - do a power search a deja.com).  The kids may only use these skis for
half a season - but it's worth it.  After picking up numerous kids (even
after the regular session opener of fall down/get up the kids get tired and
start being floppy) I'm convinced that the downhill rule - "Shorter is
better" - should apply to cross country kids.

If you must use 75mm, then always cover the ski boots with old wool socks
with a hole in the toe  (For leaders, my kids loved seeing me, one super
cold night, take off my street boots, put talc on my feet, take out old wool
socks, cut holes in the toes and put them OVER the ski boots. At -20, 1800
chill, this made a great 'inside program').

The ski saying here is "if your feet are cold, put on a toque".  A thicker
or dry toque may be needed (with ear flaps).  That may apply to hands too.

Tenth, watch the humidity.  In this freaky winter, we made the mistake of
not putting our 5 year old in his "puffy suit" and just using fleece with
nylon overpants.  The humidity and wind made him cold although the
temperature reading was quite high.

Finally, we've all seen or been in the worst case scenarios - being far from
the club house, with some obstacles or hills in the way, and the kid crying
his or her eyes out.

The stupid thing to do here is to say "Don't be a wuss" to the kid, or some
other ridiculous, egotistical statement.  (Yes, I've too often heard this on
the trails, which makes me wonder whether skiing is becoming more like
hockey every year).

The smart thing to do here is to whip out some food, solve the cold problem,
provide calm, encouraging words, and head for home (even by walking for
awhile - also this is where the PULK can be a life saver!)

I used to laugh at a friend who was showing me the ropes when I first
started Jackrabbits leading. He carried a leather bum bag bigger than my gym
bag.  In it, he had spare toques, neck warmers, mitts, granola bars, etc.  
And the stuff got used nearly every session.  What a hero he was to the
kids!  What a dolt I was when my kids were bonking, eating snow, and I had
no food nor water for them (again, fortunately we were close to home and had
the PULK.)

Anyhow, thanks for listening, and good luck.

J. Carter
_____________


Date: Wed, 02 Feb 2000 14:07:56 -0700
Subject: Re: cold thumb and a hard first outing

Quote:

>A number of things to do/try.

>First, make sure she has had a good meal, including some longer burning
>proteins before going out.

I had them eat as many PB crackers as they could about 30 minutes before we
started out, but that was already late in the morning, and they didn't eat
as many I was hoping.  Next time I'll make it pepperoni--she loves the
stuff!

Quote:
>You mentioned she was cold at the start - that is hard to overcome,
>particularly, as you noted, she was not doing a lot of work learing and
>was not going to generate heat or not much heat after the start.

I think this is what really did us in.  Can't remember if I mentioned that
through either e***ment or nervousness she got out of the car without her
mittens on, so we really started out at a disadvantage.  At least she has
some basis for having fun in cold weather before this.  We took them to a
10,000 ft. pass for sledding a few weeks earlier and they had a great
time.  And weren't cold!  Plus they're always outside whenever it snows
down here (Fort Collins, CO).

Quote:
>I would ditch any "glove" liners and use only another mitten for a
>liner.  I have been a mitten advocate for many years.  Having each
>finger in close proximity to others helps share the heat.  Actually,
>after a chilling lunch stop, I may actually shift my thumb out of the
>mitten thumb pocket and kind of wrap my warmer fingers around it - makes
>for awkward poling for a while (and probably harder for small
>fingers/hands) but generally helps the thumb warm.

Will keep this one in mind.

Quote:
>Then there are windmills - place the arms at the side and then start
>rotating up over the head and then back down by rotating the arms.
>Don't throw out the shoulders though.  Rapid windmills can drive ***
>to the hands and fingers.

This is one of my favorite quick hand warm ups.  She tried some with
limited success, but probably not fast enough, as they made her lose her
balance.  Sigh...

Quote:
>And then there is the old - hands in the arm pits which are generally
>warm.

Ha ha!  Another standby of my family.  I can remember my mom holding my
sister's frozen feet under her arms after one XC trip when she (sister) was
about 5-6 years old.  And that's exactly what I did with my daugher's hands
when we got to the warming hut for lunch.  Warmed her up in less than 5
minutes, but by that point she'd had enough skiing for one day.

Quote:
>All kinds of tricks.

>I hope it all works out - great activity to learn young.  Wish my
>parents had take me skiing WAY BACK WHEN! (G)  But I guess I have seen
>some miserable children and parents out there NOT enjoying it at all -
>too much pressure.

Yeah, as much as I wanted to go out and do some more that day, I figured my
chances of taking her out many more times in the future would be greater if
we said "We'll try again another day."  So on the next weekend with temps
at least in the high 20's, you know where we'll be!

Thanks again for all of your pointers.

C***te

______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Jason Carte » Fri, 04 Feb 2000 04:00:00

C***te,

Guess what - You've already got a Jackrabbits or a Bill Koch group!!

(For the news group - now I know I'm going to get flamed here on my failing
memory for historical and current details, so please fill in the gaps as you
see fit, and please hold the sarcasm, you whipper-snappers!)

In Canada, "Jackrabbit" Johansen became a renowned skier who emigrated to
Quebec, I believe, from Norway.  He literally started the cross country wave
in Canada by his passion for the sport and for the fun in teaching kids how
to ski.  Manitoba's claim to fame is that some enlighted skiers got the idea
of taking his ideas and his nickname to create a more structured series of
programs for young kids.  Today, Cross Country Canada oversees the
provincial ski associations, who in turn, run Jackrabbit programs for kids
of really any age.

There is an excellent Reader's Digest story about Jackrabbit, and another
biography, I believe.  Not to mention the scads of info materials available
from CCC.

In the US, Bill Koch was, and is, and exceptional skier who cracked the
European domination of ski racing.  He was, and is, I believe, passionate
for the sport.  Marty Hall, former US National Coahc, tells the story how
Koch dug a huge hole in his backyard one winter.  He filled the hole with
snow, covered it up, and waited until the summer. On his birthday, he dug up
the snow, spread it around, and went for a glorious ski!

Anyhow, I guess sometime during or after his racing career, he formed the
roughly equivalent kids programs in Maine. It must be a national program by
now.

There is a super video of Bill Koch at the height of his ski racing career.  
The best part of the video is seeing him play with the kids and zoom through
the countryside.

The group's replies will add details and contact info for the Bill Kock
League (hint, hint), but the point is any time you get two or more kids
together on skis, you have the makings for a Jackrabbits or Bill Koch
session.

These days, the concepts in JR and Koch programs are carringing over to
other sports - hockey in this town (thank goodness).  And the groups often
get together for 'dry-land' training - although the leaders just call it
"canoe trip", "hike", "mountain biking", "triathlon", or some other simile.

You're right, though, about the treat of going on a hike.  It must be
fantastic to live in CO and get up!  Our terrain here rises one inch per
mile!

I would only suggest that you can making a treat out of anything - a walk
around the block can become a "hike" if you call it that when talking to the
kids!  We go for "expotitions" (to borrow Winnie-the-Pooh's phrase) around
the local park and they have a great time too.

Have great time!

J. Carter
a.k.a. 'Eeyore', when there's no snow, of course.

Quote:



>Subject: Re: cold thumb and a hard first outing
>Date: Thu, 03 Feb 2000 09:15:03 -0700

>Hi Jason,

>Many thanks for the reply.  What are Jackrabbits or Bill Koch groups?  I
>haven't heard of these.  But I agree with your statement that having other
>kids
>along helps.  We've seen this work on hikes that we've taken the kids on in
>warmer weather and, fortunately, are friends with another XC family with
>kids
>the same ages as ours, so we're planning on getting at least the two 5 year
>olds out together, probably next weekend.  Which brings me to my next
>point:
>I've also found that keeping the kids at home or in town every other
>weekend
>really makes these outings seem like much more of a treat.  When I ask them
>if
>they want to go for a hike, they literally jump up and down and cheer.

>As far as skiing at the golf course, I'd love to, as this is how my dad
>always
>started us off.  Only problem is, all of our golf courses are filled with
>golfers right now, as our last significant snowfall was in November (I'd
>blame
>La Nina, but last year's El Nino winter was much the same--sheesh, what's
>happening to Colorado?)  At least there's skiable snow within an hour from
>home.

>Thanks again for your helpful comments.

>C***te

>--

>---
>C***te DeMott
>Dept. of Atmospheric Science
>Colorado State University
>Fort Collins CO  80526
>phone:  (970) 491-1487


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cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by Penny S » Fri, 04 Feb 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

> Have fun they grow up fast.  Mine are already independent but i'm
> teaching the 14 y.o. ti telemark which is fun,
> Mel

Ha, ha, my 13 year old son is eyeing my new t-2's. which will fit him with
thick socks.  I pick up my re-done bindings tomorrow, and I just now he will
be begging to try MY gear out....

Penny

 
 
 

cold thumb and a hard first outing

Post by William Clasp » Fri, 04 Feb 2000 04:00:00

Quote:


> : I ask because we took our 5 year old daughter out for her
> : first XC ski trip this weekend, and her freezing cold thumbs
> : made her miserable, so we cut the trip very short.  Both

> I'm unimpressed with available handwear for young children.

> My impression is that ill fitting elastic at the ***
> of the handwear (and jackets) conspire to cut off circulation
> in the hands.  One book on taking kids out in the wilds

I tracked down a pretty good pair of mittens for pre-school/early
elementary sized kids, made by Columbia, model named Chippewa.  They are
long, have a velcro adjustable strap across the wrist, and an
elastic-pullcord-with-stopper set up at the top opening of the mitt, to
cinch down so snow doesn't get into the mitt.  They are reasonably well
insulated, and my six year old has yet to complain about cold hands (we
got the mitts for her last year.)  I believe we got size XS or S, and
they fit her pretty good right now.  You are correct, Dave, in saying
that finding good mitts for babies/toddlers is tough!  I found out quick
that one layer of Polartec 200 isn't enough for little hands on a cold
day!

Quote:
> suggests using *** mitten or heavy wool socks and putting
> them on OVER the jacket, attaching them with a saftey pin
> so they don't fall off.  The trade off we've encountered
> with this approach is greater frustration on my daughter's
> part at not being able to pick things up.  But, her hands
> are warmer, I think. (repeat, I think.... very hard to know).

This has worked for both of my girls, but I only do it when they are in
the TT Kid Carrier.  They aren't interested (well... able) to pick
things up in that situation anyhow.  Just be sure to attach them
somehow.  I've put extra miles (and time) in, backtracking to retrieve
dropped mittens!  The other thing that I've done is to bring along my
Outdoor Research Modular Mitts.  I never need them except in extremely
cold situations, when the girls wouldn't be with me anyhow.  I put these
suckers right over her mittens, and she's good to go.  Best thing is,
they have idiot cords on them, so even if she manages to shuck them,
they won't get lost!  OR makes a kid sized shell/mitt setup, but it's
pretty spendy, and I think the size small is probably too big for the
under-7 set.

Cheers!
Bill