Ins and Outs of Insoles

Ins and Outs of Insoles

Post by Rick Schnu » Sat, 04 Jan 1997 04:00:00


Hello,
I've heard good things regarding improved fit and better control with
the use of custom insoles for ski boots.  I'm interested in getting
fitted for some, but I know nothing about them as far as different
types, constructions, prices, durability etc.  Any info you can give,
likes or dislikes about specific products would be greatly appreciated.  
Also, I live in central Fl so if you have experience with a specific
bootfitter in the Tampa, Orlando, or Jacksonville area that info would
be appreciated.
Thanks,
Rick

 
 
 

Ins and Outs of Insoles

Post by Anthe » Sun, 05 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I've heard good things regarding improved fit and better control with
> the use of custom insoles for ski boots.  I'm interested in getting
> fitted for some, but I know nothing about them as far as different
> types, constructions, prices, durability etc.  Any info you can give,
> likes or dislikes about specific products would be greatly appreciated.

Insoles are pretty good, but they're not the magic fix for everything. I
got some cork ones in the rear-entries, to stop my heels from
fish-tailing around - boot guy wrapped the stuff around my heels, and it
works very well. I think insoles are probably essential in rear-entries!
If you have any leg or hip problems at all, soles made by a chiropodist
or similar could be extremely beneficial to your skiing, and prevent
injury problems (like the ones I'm desperately trying to fix before
march). Note: the cork insoles are very very hard to dry, unless you
pull 'em out at night! I've been thinking about starting a mushroom farm
with mine.

Ant
--
Anthea Kerrison

http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/1298/

 
 
 

Ins and Outs of Insoles

Post by Donald Gree » Mon, 06 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:


> > I've heard good things regarding improved fit and better control with
> > the use of custom insoles for ski boots.  I'm interested in getting
> > fitted for some, but I know nothing about them as far as different
> > types, constructions, prices, durability etc.  Any info you can give,
> > likes or dislikes about specific products would be greatly appreciated.

> Insoles are pretty good, but they're not the magic fix for everything. I
> got some cork ones in the rear-entries, to stop my heels from
> fish-tailing around - boot guy wrapped the stuff around my heels, and it
> works very well. I think insoles are probably essential in rear-entries!
> If you have any leg or hip problems at all, soles made by a chiropodist
> or similar could be extremely beneficial to your skiing, and prevent
> injury problems (like the ones I'm desperately trying to fix before
> march). Note: the cork insoles are very very hard to dry, unless you
> pull 'em out at night! I've been thinking about starting a mushroom farm
> with mine.snip

The main purpose for getting a foot-bed is to straighten the stance of
the foot within the boot. It's only one of the steps that may be
necessary to get you into proper alignment. Read Warren Witherell's book
"The Athletic Skier". The beginning of the book is all about alignment.
If you are improperly aligned over your skis (both front to back and side
to side), you're starting with a serious handicap. Getting aligned could
feel like night and day. It would depend on how badly set up you are in
your present equipment.

Don

 
 
 

Ins and Outs of Insoles

Post by Stanton Krame » Mon, 06 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:
> The main purpose for getting a foot-bed is to straighten the stance of
> the foot within the boot. It's only one of the steps that may be
> necessary to get you into proper alignment. Read Warren Witherell's book
> "The Athletic Skier". The beginning of the book is all about alignment.
> If you are improperly aligned over your skis (both front to back and side
> to side), you're starting with a serious handicap. Getting aligned could
> feel like night and day. It would depend on how badly set up you are in
> your present equipment.

> Don

Don is correct in everything  said here.  There is one area that is MOST
overlooked concerning orthotics and all other types of insoles...

An orthotic works best when it supports the WHOLE foot evenly.  Better
skiers "ski off of the the bottoms of their feet".  To the untrained
eye, it appears that edging and steering is done with the knees.
Pressure fore/aft appears to be by moving the body fore and aft. This is
an incorrect observation. The better skiers edge and pressure  simply by
articulating and pressuring the feet for much of the movement. The
ankles/knees/hips tend to follow as a chain REACTION.  This is why it is
SO hard for novice skiers to emulate the experts. They can't see the
small motor movements happening in the ski boots.  Without proper
support of the insole, gross body start playing a bigger role,
compensating for the inability of the skier to concentrate their energy
in a small area inside the boots. IT ALL STARTS IN THE FEET.

I find that support of the mid-foot section is almost more important
that supporting the outside of the feet. The ideal circumstance of
course is to have equal pressure over the whole foot with the ankle in
neutral.  Alignment = balance. Skiing, after all, first and foremost is
a balance sport.

SK

 
 
 

Ins and Outs of Insoles

Post by Keith McCammo » Mon, 06 Jan 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> Hello,
> I've heard good things regarding improved fit and better control with
> the use of custom insoles for ski boots.  I'm interested in getting
> fitted for some, but I know nothing about them as far as different

I have some Superfeet insoles and they have made a big impact in my
skiing because they've stabilized the pronation in my foot. This has
resulted in going from skidding parallel turns to carving on groomed and
moguls in only one day.

http://www.superfeet.com/product/customfit.html

They are very durable (polypropolene) and warm (Polartec top and
aluminum heat blanket) and dry out quickly.

You probably should pull your boot liners out to dry anyways though.