Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Alby » Wed, 08 May 2002 17:45:48


  I'm an Intermediate skiier. I'm just getting proficient at parallel
skiing, I can make parallel stops and feel pretty good on an easy
hill.  So I was wondering, would anybody recommend I begin using
the Crossmax skis so that while I become better, I become better on
a good quality ski?   Or should the Crossmax be left only for the
advanced skiier who blazes down Diamonds like nothing?

-Alby

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Richard Wal » Wed, 08 May 2002 21:06:46



Quote:

>  I'm an Intermediate skiier. I'm just getting proficient at parallel
>skiing, I can make parallel stops and feel pretty good on an easy
>hill.  So I was wondering, would anybody recommend I begin using
>the Crossmax skis so that while I become better, I become better on
>a good quality ski?   Or should the Crossmax be left only for the
>advanced skiier who blazes down Diamonds like nothing?

>-Alby

Where are you skiing? West? East?
Male? Female?
Size?
Ability you've basically told us.

All of these factors go into ski selection.
If you are a western skier you would probably
like the Verse 10 Pilot over the CrossMax 10,
it's a lot softer while maintaining good
edge control.

Or perhaps one of the CrossMax models lower than
the 10.

The 10 is a high performance, all mountain free-ride.

In this rarified atmosphere of skis ($1000+ msrp)
buying without demo-ing is REALLY dumb. It just
might be that you CAN handle these skis at your
present level. If so, go ahead and they will last
you well into your expert years.

More advice that you didn't ask for...
If your intention for these skis is to help advance
your ability (which they may well do) I'd strongly
suggest that you look into GOOD, WELL FITTED boots
first. Also, go to a fitter who can measure any
abnormality in your stance, pronation, etc. and
adjust, modify your boots to suit you. You'd be
amazed at the instant jump in "ability" when your
feet are aimed in the right direction.

BTW, The CrossMax, and others like it are designed to
ski well at shorter lengths. I ski a similar ski,
(Blizzard FR22) in 165cm. I skied and liked the
Verse 10 in 165cm, but judged it too soft for the
EasternFirm(tm) I usually ski.

I'm 6 feet tall, 200 lbs (quiet Horvie) and have
been skiing for 50 years. My boots are Salomon
almost racing boots (racing shell with cushy liner)
and ski anything, any conditions.

Aaron Daniel, who regularly posts here is also
an Eastern skier and knows a lot about the Salomon
line. I know most about what I ski (Salomon
X-Scream 1080 for crud, spring, rocks -- Salomon
AxeCleaver for general purpose, working, etc.
for the past 3 years -- now Blizzard FR22 for
general purpose, going fast, steep, working, going
slow, most anything).

RW

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Aaron Danie » Wed, 08 May 2002 21:13:30

I have a pair of Crossmax 10s. They were my primary skis last season. In my
estimation the Crossmax 10 Pilot is a ski that rewards proper technique and
high level/power input. For a ski that does that it makes you pay for your
mistakes less than other skis like it. So, if you are in the ballpark of
being ready to ski an "all-mountain/expert" ski the Crossmax is one you
should seriously consider.

From your description of yourself as being able to "make parallel stops and
feel pretty god on an easy hill" I have reservations about whether you
should consider a ski in the Crossmax 10 Pilot's category. Of course I saw
many people at Whistler skiing the Crossmax (demoing it I hope) with wedge
to wedge-christie skills. When I talked to them on the lift they were
enjoying the skis. Thus, you may easily purchase the ski and have a lot of
fun on them regardless of your skill level. There is a big difference
between properly skiing a ski and just simply sliding down the hill on it.
There were few people at Whistler actually skiing the Crossmax 10 Pilot of
the overall population on it. So, I would say it takes a certain skill level
to really ski it.

If you are powerful and aggressive on your skis you will be able to reach up
to the next level of skis above your skill level and maybe the Crossmax 10
Pilot would work for you. I believe a better choice would be the Crossmax 8
Pilot. This ski really rewards good technique without making you pay the
penalty for sloppy technique. It also does not respond well to being
improperly overpowered which gives you negative feedback for mistakes.

Aar

Quote:

>   I'm an Intermediate skiier. I'm just getting proficient at parallel
> skiing, I can make parallel stops and feel pretty good on an easy
> hill.  So I was wondering, would anybody recommend I begin using
> the Crossmax skis so that while I become better, I become better on
> a good quality ski?   Or should the Crossmax be left only for the
> advanced skiier who blazes down Diamonds like nothing?

> -Alby


 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Alby » Wed, 08 May 2002 22:01:04

  I am 6'2" 230lbs and I usually ski East Coast, but I do plan
to make some West Coast Trips.  Overall, it seems like what everybody
is saying that there are more Pros than Cons with the Crossmax 10
assuming you at least know how to ski..  So even though the ski is
designed for the High Core Expert skiier, it isn't limited to just that
small select crowd.  Overall, I believe I would need the 192cm X10,
my current skis are:  Salomon X-Free 8 (191cm)

 So do you think that would be a good upgrade?

_Alby


Quote:
> I have a pair of Crossmax 10s. They were my primary skis last season. In
my
> estimation the Crossmax 10 Pilot is a ski that rewards proper technique
and
> high level/power input. For a ski that does that it makes you pay for your
> mistakes less than other skis like it. So, if you are in the ballpark of
> being ready to ski an "all-mountain/expert" ski the Crossmax is one you
> should seriously consider.

> From your description of yourself as being able to "make parallel stops
and
> feel pretty god on an easy hill" I have reservations about whether you
> should consider a ski in the Crossmax 10 Pilot's category. Of course I saw
> many people at Whistler skiing the Crossmax (demoing it I hope) with wedge
> to wedge-christie skills. When I talked to them on the lift they were
> enjoying the skis. Thus, you may easily purchase the ski and have a lot of
> fun on them regardless of your skill level. There is a big difference
> between properly skiing a ski and just simply sliding down the hill on it.
> There were few people at Whistler actually skiing the Crossmax 10 Pilot of
> the overall population on it. So, I would say it takes a certain skill
level
> to really ski it.

> If you are powerful and aggressive on your skis you will be able to reach
up
> to the next level of skis above your skill level and maybe the Crossmax 10
> Pilot would work for you. I believe a better choice would be the Crossmax
8
> Pilot. This ski really rewards good technique without making you pay the
> penalty for sloppy technique. It also does not respond well to being
> improperly overpowered which gives you negative feedback for mistakes.

> Aar


> >   I'm an Intermediate skiier. I'm just getting proficient at parallel
> > skiing, I can make parallel stops and feel pretty good on an easy
> > hill.  So I was wondering, would anybody recommend I begin using
> > the Crossmax skis so that while I become better, I become better on
> > a good quality ski?   Or should the Crossmax be left only for the
> > advanced skiier who blazes down Diamonds like nothing?

> > -Alby

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by foot2foo » Thu, 09 May 2002 00:10:25

Do you like to go "really fast fast fast", or do you like to
make lots of short radius turns?

I'm thinking about the length you should consider.
The most "expert" hot hot hot ski gets a lot more
"advanced"  if you buy it shorter. For instance, buying
one sixty if you usually ski one eighty. But shorter skis
don't go fast as well as longer ones.

The thing is though, to my way of thinking, if you only
have one pair of skis, they have to be able to float you
across flats in two-footed stance type powder. This may
require a fairly long ski.. Probably at least a one eighty.

Then, also, *how* do you turn? Do you steer the skis,
do bend them, do you slide them?

A more "advanced" ski will be stiffer so it won't be as
easy to turn. If you like to slide, the stiffness won't make
much difference. If you do a lot of steering or bending the
ski, the ski will respond more precisely, so that you must
be precise with your control of it.

If it was me, I'd probably just buy whatever ski that is an
advanced to expert ski that was the best deal. A giant
slalom/slalom type if you want to go really fast on groom and
ice or pack, or an all mountain if you like to venture off the
groomed and go down that tough and steep semi fresh,
tracked up powder. I certainly wouldn't buy an "intermediate"
ski, but I might not buy an "expert" ski either, unless it was a
really good deal, which probably none of them will be.

I really don't think buying an "expert" ski will get you any
better any faster than buying an "advanced" ski. Only time
on the snow, challenging yourself more and more, and getting
feedback on your skiing are going to make you a better skier. . .


Quote:

>   I'm an Intermediate skiier. I'm just getting proficient at parallel
> skiing, I can make parallel stops and feel pretty good on an easy
> hill.  So I was wondering, would anybody recommend I begin using
> the Crossmax skis so that while I become better, I become better on
> a good quality ski?   Or should the Crossmax be left only for the
> advanced skiier who blazes down Diamonds like nothing?

> -Alby

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Alby » Thu, 09 May 2002 01:26:02

  I would say the I like making lots of turns. I'm not big into
speeding like a mad-man down the slopes, but taking a nice
calm approach. The typical turning left/right as I go down the
mountain.  Since I understand the Crossmax is geared towards
carving, I figured my style would work right into those skis.
But of course, before I shell out $700 (Cheap in Summer),
I figured I would get the 411 from the group here...

-Alby


Quote:
> Do you like to go "really fast fast fast", or do you like to
> make lots of short radius turns?

> I'm thinking about the length you should consider.
> The most "expert" hot hot hot ski gets a lot more
> "advanced"  if you buy it shorter. For instance, buying
> one sixty if you usually ski one eighty. But shorter skis
> don't go fast as well as longer ones.

> The thing is though, to my way of thinking, if you only
> have one pair of skis, they have to be able to float you
> across flats in two-footed stance type powder. This may
> require a fairly long ski.. Probably at least a one eighty.

> Then, also, *how* do you turn? Do you steer the skis,
> do bend them, do you slide them?

> A more "advanced" ski will be stiffer so it won't be as
> easy to turn. If you like to slide, the stiffness won't make
> much difference. If you do a lot of steering or bending the
> ski, the ski will respond more precisely, so that you must
> be precise with your control of it.

> If it was me, I'd probably just buy whatever ski that is an
> advanced to expert ski that was the best deal. A giant
> slalom/slalom type if you want to go really fast on groom and
> ice or pack, or an all mountain if you like to venture off the
> groomed and go down that tough and steep semi fresh,
> tracked up powder. I certainly wouldn't buy an "intermediate"
> ski, but I might not buy an "expert" ski either, unless it was a
> really good deal, which probably none of them will be.

> I really don't think buying an "expert" ski will get you any
> better any faster than buying an "advanced" ski. Only time
> on the snow, challenging yourself more and more, and getting
> feedback on your skiing are going to make you a better skier. . .



> >   I'm an Intermediate skiier. I'm just getting proficient at parallel
> > skiing, I can make parallel stops and feel pretty good on an easy
> > hill.  So I was wondering, would anybody recommend I begin using
> > the Crossmax skis so that while I become better, I become better on
> > a good quality ski?   Or should the Crossmax be left only for the
> > advanced skiier who blazes down Diamonds like nothing?

> > -Alby

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Richard Wal » Thu, 09 May 2002 01:46:37



Quote:

>  I am 6'2" 230lbs and I usually ski East Coast, but I do plan
>to make some West Coast Trips.  Overall, it seems like what everybody
>is saying that there are more Pros than Cons with the Crossmax 10
>assuming you at least know how to ski..  So even though the ski is
>designed for the High Core Expert skiier, it isn't limited to just that
>small select crowd.  Overall, I believe I would need the 192cm X10,
>my current skis are:  Salomon X-Free 8 (191cm)

> So do you think that would be a good upgrade?

WAAAYYYYY TOO LONGGGGGG.....!!!!!!

At the very MOST, get a 175cm, probably the best choice
for your size/weight (See my post again). If you get the
chance, go for a demo ride BEFORE you buy. These newer
skis ski VERY well in shorter lengths. As I said, I ski
a 165cm or even if I'm on my AxeCleavers, a 152cm.

The 152's are a trifle spooky if the snow is sticky.
They tend to feel like you are about to go over the
handle bars. Never done it, but it feels weird. That's
why my early/late season skis are 177cm.

FORGET WHAT YOU HAVE HEARD ABOUT LENTGTH when considering
the latest in skis.

Aaron didn't mention length, and he may think I've gone
too far in short skis, but consider, world class racers
(men) are skiing slalom on 155cm skis and the women are
on 145cm skis. GS is often skied on 185cm skis.

Now, do you really want a pair of skis so damn long?

RW

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Aaron Danie » Thu, 09 May 2002 06:02:23

Alby:

I'm 5'11" 230lbs. I ski the Crossmax in a 180. My other skis are Salomon
Equipe 10 2V 188cm (GS racing ski - limited use). Salomon Equipe 10 3V 176cm
(SL racing ski - used almost as much as the Crossmax). Next year my skis
will be the 180 Crossmax, shortest possible (prob 180cm) Equipe 10 2V, 160cm
Equipe 10 3V and the other holdover - 176cm Equipe 10 3V. Point being I am
about your size (bring it on Horvy!) and the longest skis I have are
significantly shorter than the ones you're considering.

The longest Crossmax 10 I would recommend for you would be a 180cm. If you
are looking to improve your parallel skiing I stick by my recommendation of
the Crossmax 8 Pilot in a 175 or 180cm. If you can pick up a Crossmax 10
Pilot on a better deal than a Crossmax 8 Pilot I recommend the 170cm for you
with the 175 and 180 as fourth and distant fifth choices.

The Crossmax 8 Pilot is substantially different than your X-Free 8. It is
designed to be skied much shorter than your X-Free. It also rewards proper
technique much more effectively by really "hooking up" and skiing really
smoothly when you get it right. The Crossmax 10 is the same in that regard
but when you get it wrong the Crossmax 10 can be really frustrating in that
it really looks to grab an edgeset wherever it can. It is also energetic
enough that it can shoot out from under you when you need it to stay put.

While the Crossmax 10 is not limited to the "small select crowd" it can slow
your progress if you are not aggressive and athletic enough to push yourself
on skis.

As a little more background about you. How long have you been skiing? How
many days per season have you skied in the past? How many do you expect to
ski next season? Approximately how old are you? Are you a weekend warrior or
do you exercise throughout the week/year? If you choose not to respond
online please consider them as you choose between the Crossmax 8 and 10 (or
other skis you're thinking about).

Aar

"Richard Walsh" ...

Quote:
> "Alby" wrote :

> >  I am 6'2" 230lbs and I usually ski East Coast, but I do plan
> >to make some West Coast Trips.  Overall, it seems like what everybody
> >is saying that there are more Pros than Cons with the Crossmax 10
> >assuming you at least know how to ski..  So even though the ski is
> >designed for the High Core Expert skiier, it isn't limited to just that
> >small select crowd.  Overall, I believe I would need the 192cm X10,
> >my current skis are:  Salomon X-Free 8 (191cm)

> > So do you think that would be a good upgrade?

> WAAAYYYYY TOO LONGGGGGG.....!!!!!!

> At the very MOST, get a 175cm, probably the best choice
> for your size/weight (See my post again). If you get the
> chance, go for a demo ride BEFORE you buy. These newer
> skis ski VERY well in shorter lengths. As I said, I ski
> a 165cm or even if I'm on my AxeCleavers, a 152cm.

> The 152's are a trifle spooky if the snow is sticky.
> They tend to feel like you are about to go over the
> handle bars. Never done it, but it feels weird. That's
> why my early/late season skis are 177cm.

> FORGET WHAT YOU HAVE HEARD ABOUT LENTGTH when considering
> the latest in skis.

> Aaron didn't mention length, and he may think I've gone
> too far in short skis, but consider, world class racers
> (men) are skiing slalom on 155cm skis and the women are
> on 145cm skis. GS is often skied on 185cm skis.

> Now, do you really want a pair of skis so damn long?

> RW

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by lal_truck » Thu, 09 May 2002 07:33:23

Quote:



> >  I am 6'2" 230lbs and I usually ski East Coast, but I do plan
> >to make some West Coast Trips.  Overall, it seems like what everybody
> >is saying that there are more Pros than Cons with the Crossmax 10
> >assuming you at least know how to ski..  So even though the ski is
> >designed for the High Core Expert skiier, it isn't limited to just that
> >small select crowd.  Overall, I believe I would need the 192cm X10,
> >my current skis are:  Salomon X-Free 8 (191cm)

> > So do you think that would be a good upgrade?

> WAAAYYYYY TOO LONGGGGGG.....!!!!!!

> At the very MOST, get a 175cm, probably the best choice
> for your size/weight (See my post again). If you get the
> chance, go for a demo ride BEFORE you buy. These newer
> skis ski VERY well in shorter lengths. As I said, I ski
> a 165cm or even if I'm on my AxeCleavers, a 152cm.

> The 152's are a trifle spooky if the snow is sticky.
> They tend to feel like you are about to go over the
> handle bars. Never done it, but it feels weird. That's
> why my early/late season skis are 177cm.

> FORGET WHAT YOU HAVE HEARD ABOUT LENTGTH when considering
> the latest in skis.

> Aaron didn't mention length, and he may think I've gone
> too far in short skis, but consider, world class racers
> (men) are skiing slalom on 155cm skis and the women are
> on 145cm skis. GS is often skied on 185cm skis.

> Now, do you really want a pair of skis so damn long?

I gotta ask - RW, if Salomon is making a 192cm X10 (which I don't
really know), and given that this guy is 6'2" 230lbs and you say he
should be on a 180cm ski, then who in the world is George Salomon's
company making this 192 ski for? Ski folks don't really come much
bigger than 6'2" 230lbs.
(He says he's basically a beginner, but for this question assume he's
really an expert skier.)

So, is Salomon just *** out a bunch of 192s with no intention of
selling them? What do you think?

-------------------------------------
Still on 225s when the mood hits ...

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Richard Wal » Thu, 09 May 2002 09:22:49



Quote:




>> >  I am 6'2" 230lbs and I usually ski East Coast, but I do plan
>> >to make some West Coast Trips.  Overall, it seems like what everybody
(snip)

>> WAAAYYYYY TOO LONGGGGGG.....!!!!!!

>> At the very MOST, get a 175cm, probably the best choice
(snip again)

>> Now, do you really want a pair of skis so damn long?

>I gotta ask - RW, if Salomon is making a 192cm X10 (which I don't
>really know), and given that this guy is 6'2" 230lbs and you say he
>should be on a 180cm ski, then who in the world is George Salomon's
>company making this 192 ski for? Ski folks don't really come much
>bigger than 6'2" 230lbs.
>(He says he's basically a beginner, but for this question assume he's
>really an expert skier.)

>So, is Salomon just *** out a bunch of 192s with no intention of
>selling them? What do you think?

Clearly, George is making skis for retro-grouches like you.

But seriously, and I'm almost serious with the snappy
comeback above. People, especially expert skiers are usually
very conservative in the evolution of their ski equipment.

This post and others by you and by other experts tends to
support this hypothesis. Doesn't it?

I have worked in recent years in ski shops, I have three ski
shop owners as regular clients for my design business. I get
to try a lot of stuff. Also, very probably, if I had learned
to ski IN deep snow as I understand you do, I would probably
like long skinny board for it. But I didn't. We barely have
deep snow around here, so cheating and skiing up on top with
short wide boards is what I do when I encounter anything more
than 6 inches deep. I'm also gettin along in years. As an
earlier post in this thread stated, I've been at it for
50 years. And I didn't start as a baby.

I loaned the short Blizzards to a friend of mine who is
a 5'5" woman who normally skis 190cm SnowRangers. She
loved 'em but her comment was that she felt she was cheating.
Yeah, so am I, no question, but by "cheating" I can ski
8 hours straight, on EasternFirm(tm) and go back and do
it again next day, at 60 years old.

The following is my journey to short skis. I didn't always
ski them, in fact, back in the 60's I generally skied 215cm
skis. In the mid 70's my wife got a pair of K2 Bermuda Shorts
in 160cm. These were too much for her. She should have gotten
something much softer. I took them out, liked them for some
things but they weren't too stable and anything like speed,
so I stuck with my 200cm to 205cm skis that I was usually
on. I took the K2's out again in the early 90's with MUCH
better boots than I had 15 years before, and liked them
for bump runs, which I normally avoided like the plague on
my longer skis. Otherwise, speed still wasn't too good.

The first year I considered shaped skis, I had tried a pair
of Elans and loved them. I decided to buy a pair of good shaped
skis. I chose Rossi Cut 9.9 Super in 189cm. I wasn't absolutely
sure that I'd like these for most/all conditions, so being an
GS ski skier, I also bought a pair of Volkl P20's in 205cm.
To make a long story short, I only skied the Volkl's 4 or 5
times and the dealer was good enough to take them back and put
them on his used demo rack and I ended up paying nothing.
This in 96-97.

Then I got a pair of Elan PSX tsi's, on which I put a
20mm riser to get up into nosebleed country. What a pair of
cruisers those were. They are still on my ski rack.

Next, after skiing a pair of REALLY short REALLY shaped
Elans with Peter Kidd, who showed me how to dig trenches, I
bought a pair of Salomon AxeCleavers. One size only 152cm.
Came with a hangl plate. Got them for Euro-style carving.
Found that they did EVERYTHING (except maybe deep powder)
very well. They became my "everyday" skis. After 3 years
the skis are still OK and will become my "house" skis
with rental type bindings. Most people, from strong beginners
to pretty much top experts can have a lot of fun on them.
The hangl plate, BTW has a reverse camber.

My current (or rather next year's) skis are 165cm Blizzard
FR22 Free-Ride skis. Really neat, a stronger than
the little Salomons, they push back more stongly when pushed.

So here I am, generally advocating shorter lengths, especially
in the Free-Ride style of ski.

Hey, maybe our buddy Alby is getting such a good deal on these
skis BECAUSE they are 192cm, and the store is stuck with them.

RW (God, that was long answer)

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Alby » Thu, 09 May 2002 09:27:49

 I've been drinking so excuse and typos.. I am 6'2" 230ish lbs
and I've been skiing for 3 years now. I'm 29/yrs old and I'm a
weekend warrior.  I still stick to the the intermediate slopes and
I don't like to go super fast. My style is slow-rolling turns which
keep my speed at at a minimun...  I'd consider myself a 5 on scale of
1 thru 10. I can parallel stop and kick up some snow, I usually ski
East Coast spots which is manly hard pack/ice and what I'm looking
for in the X10 is the ability to enhance my carving/tunes over my
current 191cm X-Free 8 skis. The X-Free 8 skis to me feel like
they are heavy and difficult to turn due to their size and weight.
So I'm looking at the X10s to ease my turning/carve style without
having to put so much energy and strength into turning like I need
with the X-Free 8s that seem more like a "Go straight and burn ***"
type ski...

    So tell me, will switching from the X-Free 8 skis to the X-10 Pilots
improve my ability to turn on a dime and feel like I have more control
over cornering and  stoping than I do with me X-Free 8's?

-Alby

Quote:

> I gotta ask - RW, if Salomon is making a 192cm X10 (which I don't
> really know), and given that this guy is 6'2" 230lbs and you say he
> should be on a 180cm ski, then who in the world is George Salomon's
> company making this 192 ski for? Ski folks don't really come much
> bigger than 6'2" 230lbs.
> (He says he's basically a beginner, but for this question assume he's
> really an expert skier.)

> So, is Salomon just *** out a bunch of 192s with no intention of
> selling them? What do you think?

> -------------------------------------
> Still on 225s when the mood hits ...

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Go Fi » Thu, 09 May 2002 09:37:53



Quote:






> >> >  I am 6'2" 230lbs and I usually ski East Coast, but I do plan
> >> >to make some West Coast Trips.  Overall, it seems like what everybody
> (snip)

> >> WAAAYYYYY TOO LONGGGGGG.....!!!!!!

> >> At the very MOST, get a 175cm, probably the best choice
> (snip again)

> >> Now, do you really want a pair of skis so damn long?

> >I gotta ask - RW, if Salomon is making a 192cm X10 (which I don't
> >really know), and given that this guy is 6'2" 230lbs and you say he
> >should be on a 180cm ski, then who in the world is George Salomon's
> >company making this 192 ski for? Ski folks don't really come much
> >bigger than 6'2" 230lbs.
> >(He says he's basically a beginner, but for this question assume he's
> >really an expert skier.)

> >So, is Salomon just *** out a bunch of 192s with no intention of
> >selling them? What do you think?

> Clearly, George is making skis for retro-grouches like you.

> But seriously, and I'm almost serious with the snappy
> comeback above. People, especially expert skiers are usually
> very conservative in the evolution of their ski equipment.

I would not get rid of a pair of Hansen boots years past their time...
Luckily I was living in Boulder so had access to the factory.

Got a pair of RC4 in Japan in '84 (the only pair of 205 in the country)
and still ski on them today sometimes.

My cold day gloves from 20 years ago, are now my beloved spring
gloves... 'like butter'.

All that said... just back from Whistler and I rented the Salomon Scream
Pilot 10.... just awesome... amazing.

jay
Tue, May 7, 2002

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> This post and others by you and by other experts tends to
> support this hypothesis. Doesn't it?

> I have worked in recent years in ski shops, I have three ski
> shop owners as regular clients for my design business. I get
> to try a lot of stuff. Also, very probably, if I had learned
> to ski IN deep snow as I understand you do, I would probably
> like long skinny board for it. But I didn't. We barely have
> deep snow around here, so cheating and skiing up on top with
> short wide boards is what I do when I encounter anything more
> than 6 inches deep. I'm also gettin along in years. As an
> earlier post in this thread stated, I've been at it for
> 50 years. And I didn't start as a baby.

> I loaned the short Blizzards to a friend of mine who is
> a 5'5" woman who normally skis 190cm SnowRangers. She
> loved 'em but her comment was that she felt she was cheating.
> Yeah, so am I, no question, but by "cheating" I can ski
> 8 hours straight, on EasternFirm(tm) and go back and do
> it again next day, at 60 years old.

> The following is my journey to short skis. I didn't always
> ski them, in fact, back in the 60's I generally skied 215cm
> skis. In the mid 70's my wife got a pair of K2 Bermuda Shorts
> in 160cm. These were too much for her. She should have gotten
> something much softer. I took them out, liked them for some
> things but they weren't too stable and anything like speed,
> so I stuck with my 200cm to 205cm skis that I was usually
> on. I took the K2's out again in the early 90's with MUCH
> better boots than I had 15 years before, and liked them
> for bump runs, which I normally avoided like the plague on
> my longer skis. Otherwise, speed still wasn't too good.

> The first year I considered shaped skis, I had tried a pair
> of Elans and loved them. I decided to buy a pair of good shaped
> skis. I chose Rossi Cut 9.9 Super in 189cm. I wasn't absolutely
> sure that I'd like these for most/all conditions, so being an
> GS ski skier, I also bought a pair of Volkl P20's in 205cm.
> To make a long story short, I only skied the Volkl's 4 or 5
> times and the dealer was good enough to take them back and put
> them on his used demo rack and I ended up paying nothing.
> This in 96-97.

> Then I got a pair of Elan PSX tsi's, on which I put a
> 20mm riser to get up into nosebleed country. What a pair of
> cruisers those were. They are still on my ski rack.

> Next, after skiing a pair of REALLY short REALLY shaped
> Elans with Peter Kidd, who showed me how to dig trenches, I
> bought a pair of Salomon AxeCleavers. One size only 152cm.
> Came with a hangl plate. Got them for Euro-style carving.
> Found that they did EVERYTHING (except maybe deep powder)
> very well. They became my "everyday" skis. After 3 years
> the skis are still OK and will become my "house" skis
> with rental type bindings. Most people, from strong beginners
> to pretty much top experts can have a lot of fun on them.
> The hangl plate, BTW has a reverse camber.

> My current (or rather next year's) skis are 165cm Blizzard
> FR22 Free-Ride skis. Really neat, a stronger than
> the little Salomons, they push back more stongly when pushed.

> So here I am, generally advocating shorter lengths, especially
> in the Free-Ride style of ski.

> Hey, maybe our buddy Alby is getting such a good deal on these
> skis BECAUSE they are 192cm, and the store is stuck with them.

> RW (God, that was long answer)

--

Legend insists that as he finished his abject...
Galileo muttered under his breath: "Nevertheless, it does move."

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Sam Huffma » Thu, 09 May 2002 09:42:16

Quote:



> >  I am 6'2" 230lbs and I usually ski East Coast, but I do plan
> >to make some West Coast Trips.  Overall, it seems like what everybody
> >is saying that there are more Pros than Cons with the Crossmax 10
> >assuming you at least know how to ski..  So even though the ski is
> >designed for the High Core Expert skiier, it isn't limited to just that
> >small select crowd.  Overall, I believe I would need the 192cm X10,
> >my current skis are:  Salomon X-Free 8 (191cm)

> > So do you think that would be a good upgrade?

> WAAAYYYYY TOO LONGGGGGG.....!!!!!!

I agree, go with a 175 or 180.

Quote:
> Aaron didn't mention length, and he may think I've gone
> too far in short skis, but consider, world class racers
> (men) are skiing slalom on 155cm skis and the women are
> on 145cm skis. GS is often skied on 185cm skis.

I hear this comparison a lot, and it always strikes me as
questionable. World-class slalom racers are racing on
specialized courses in a style that barely resembles skiing.
I have never seen anyone imitate that style when free-
skiing, and I suspect that even these world-class racers
hang up their shorty slalom skis when they're trying to
have fun.

Sam

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by Crai » Thu, 09 May 2002 13:28:32

Quote:
>  So do you think that would be a good upgrade?

Like others have said, maybe a little long.  I'm just a few inches/pounds
short of you, and I'm still growing into XScream Series 187's.  I was skiing
on a pair of 179's for the latter part of the season, and while they're
wicked fun in the bumps, they don't feel as solid as the 187's at speed or
in crud.

I was stupid - I moved out here and bought a pair of XScreams in '99 without
trying them once.  Luckily for me, they worked out great.  I wrecked an edge
(repaired once) this year, thus the new ones.  Try 'em out first - demo
shops usually take the cost of the demo off.  Of course, this is also the
best time of the year to buy skis.

Whatever you do, enjoy!

Craig

 
 
 

Salomon CrossMax 10 Pilot

Post by ant » Thu, 09 May 2002 14:14:09


Quote:
>   I'm an Intermediate skiier. I'm just getting proficient at parallel
> skiing, I can make parallel stops and feel pretty good on an easy
> hill.  So I was wondering, would anybody recommend I begin using
> the Crossmax skis so that while I become better, I become better on
> a good quality ski?   Or should the Crossmax be left only for the
> advanced skiier who blazes down Diamonds like nothing?

I was amazed at how soft those things are. Salomon have become quite clever,
at making soft, user-friendly skis, with those sticks on to give them some
performance and snap. The shovels on those crossmaxes are downright floppy.
I imagine that they'd be OK, provided you're staying in the middle of your
skis (not leaning backward!) and keep the speed under control.
Our trainer was *** his off at the end of teh season for $350, but they
were 170s and my ski bag was bulging.

ant