Making your Own Wax

Making your Own Wax

Post by Michael J. Edelm » Fri, 03 Feb 1995 01:01:55


I've been researching this question since it came up a while ago, and
the best information I've found so far appears in the Sierra CLub's
manual of ski mountaineering- the older editions from the 50s and 60s.
Still very good books, BTW; they recommend standard downhill skis and
cable bindings for mountaineering ;-)

Anyways, the formulas are simple. For dry snow, a mixture of beeswax
and silicone waterproofing liquid. The wax provides grip, the silicone
provides the necessary hydrophobic characteristics, I imagine.

For grundwax and klister, various proportions of pine tar and shellac
flakes, heated together. This is something that should no doubt be done
outdoors in a double boiler. You're looking for a consitency that pulls
apart in threads, like good klister. Add more tar for klister, more
shellac for base wax.  PIne tar based waxes can also be used for dry snow-
my old cake of Jack Rabbit wax smells like a pine tree has been mixed in it.

No doubt the modern experimenter could extend these formulas. You can buy
finely powdered teflon at your local gun shop, under the Rmeington brand.
This would probably be a good thing to mix with beeswax. And for colder
weather, mix some harder waxes with the beeswax- paraffin or carnauba- to
cut grip. And powdered aluminum can be mixed with soft waxes or klisters
to make wet snow wax. This is used in a number of commercial formulas,
including Tomm Murstads, which I have a couple old tubes of.

No doubt all these materials can be combined in other interesting ways;
hey, how about a rec.skiing.nordic wax formulating contest?

--mike

 
 
 

Making your Own Wax

Post by William Kellagh » Fri, 03 Feb 1995 23:58:09


Quote:

>No doubt all these materials can be combined in other interesting ways;
>hey, how about a rec.skiing.nordic wax formulating contest?

I once read in a book about Amundsen's Antarctic expedition that early xc skiers
found that rubbing a certain type of cheese on their skis worked exceptionally
well for grip wax.

 Bill Kellagher  

 
 
 

Making your Own Wax

Post by Heikki Kanto » Thu, 09 Feb 1995 04:49:56


Quote:

> >No doubt all these materials can be combined in other interesting ways;
> >hey, how about a rec.skiing.nordic wax formulating contest?

> I once read in a book about Amundsen's Antarctic expedition that early xc skiers
> found that rubbing a certain type of cheese on their skis worked exceptionally
> well for grip wax.

Dunno about cheese, but my parents and grandparents have been telling
that in the old days the wooden skis were simply tarred to gain grip.
Probably works as even nowadays one can buy those Start's tar waxes.

--

Computer Linguistics Student         ///  niin monimutkaista kuin milt?
at the University of Helsinki    \\\///   se n?ytt?? - se on paljon


 
 
 

Making your Own Wax

Post by Timo Kirav » Thu, 09 Feb 1995 07:25:25

Quote:

> I once read in a book about Amundsen's Antarctic expedition
> that early xc skiers found that rubbing a certain type of
> cheese on their skis worked exceptionally

You are several thousand years off in that "early" part...

Traditionally in Finland one ski was short and thick, with fur
(skin) in the bottom for kicking. Another ski was long and
slender for sliding.

I don't know when tar became in fashion, maybe some time last
century. When I was a kid, my skis were tarred every few
years. No waxing necessary, unless one aims for optimal
performance.

Now I have waxable skis, almost useless unless waxed
correctly. No-wax skis have developed in recent years, my next
pair is going to be one of those.

--
Timo Kiravuo
Nixu oy