Salomon Pilot Series

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by Richard Wals » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

>Good question.  A good binding can last forever if it's treated gently.
What
>breaks bindings is usually an impact, as in being dropped off ski rack (or
from
>an airplane cargo door), or bounced off a rock.  A heavy blow can easily
bend a
>pivot post or fracture a housing.  The most common damage is easy to
repair: a
>torn anti-friction pad or twisted ski brake arm.  These can be replaced.
Heavy
>vibration or corrosion can loosen the mounting screws, so these should be
>checked regularly.  Road salt is a terrible curse -- it can rot the heart
out of
>a binding with a damaged housing or DIN window. Keep bindings clean and
adjusted
>and they'll outlast the skis and boots by years.

Generally agreed, however, plastic has a life regardless of what you
do to it. For instance, Salomon made their 747 model in aluminum
(Equipe) and plastic. The plastic tended to fatigue through the years.
The most common breakage I saw was the lug on the heel piece which
activates the heel to close it completely gone. The binding otherwise
worked fine, you just had to reach down and close the heel. The
aluminum one lasted forever. Some low end bindings, even today
are mainly plastic, but look closely at a Marker or a Salomon. The
heel levers, even if plastic is showing are really metal.

Remember the plastic Tyrolias? How about Geze heels? Had lots
of those lined up on the window sill of the the repair shop at
Bear Mountain at Killington (That's the broken equipment capital
of the world). Those Geze's weren't even old, no more than a year
or two.
RW
(snip)

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by Goog » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
>Neutral axis mounting -- i.e., screws through the sides of the ski vs.
through the top
>-- is clearly the way to  go.  Attaching the binding this way would seem
to provide
>for the greatest opportunity to allow the ski to bend in a continuous

curve.

Except for the unusual mounting position aside, isn't Atomic doing
essentially the same thing with the pre-drilled plates on some of the
Beta's, which only take Atomic/ESS bindings.

This side-mount thing sounds gimmicky.  Can you help me visualize it?

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by jos.. » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Quote:
>Springs perform best toward the mid ranges of their designed tension.

My intuition has always suspected that but the question is ..... why?
Do you know of any tests proving this out?

The FORCE - for the curious
Jobewan Kinobe

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by terry mors » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> >Springs perform best toward the mid ranges of their designed tension.

> My intuition has always suspected that but the question is ..... why?
> Do you know of any tests proving this out?

"Performing best" means that a spring behaves linearly (force increases
linearly with deflection). But when a spring is almost completely
compressed, the force increases substantially. A product designer makes
sure this never happens in normal operation, so I doubt this is an
problem in a ski binding.

--
-terry
http://www.terrymorse.com/ski/

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by jos.. » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:

>Regardless, I must tell you that the Pilot binding is for real.  Had a chance to ski
>on it at Salomon's North American intro at Copper in early December and it was very
>cool.

What was the top of its DIN setting range?

The FORCE - wants to know
Jobewan

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by tpet.. » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Jobewan,

To my recollection, the top of the scale on the one I tried was 14.

Sure they will have heavier springs eventually for those who need them...

TP

Quote:


> >Regardless, I must tell you that the Pilot binding is for real.  Had a chance to ski
> >on it at Salomon's North American intro at Copper in early December and it was very
> >cool.

> What was the top of its DIN setting range?

> The FORCE - wants to know
> Jobewan

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by tpet.. » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Goog,

Imagine you have a sandwich with nice thick slices of ham and cheese.

If you put the conventional wood***through the bread and through the
cheese and into the ham, you would effectively "pin" those layers together.

Now...if you could go through the side of the sandwich, never touching the
bread and going between the ham and cheese layers horizontally rather than
vertically, there would be much less "pinning" of the layers.  If you flexed
the sandwich, the layers would be more free to sheer against one another.
This results in a more natural bending curve, not to mention some improved
dampening.

You could probably duplicate this experiment, but I don't know if a wood
***will tap into a ham&cheese sammy.

Tim

Quote:

> >Neutral axis mounting -- i.e., screws through the sides of the ski vs.
> through the top
> >-- is clearly the way to  go.  Attaching the binding this way would seem
> to provide
> >for the greatest opportunity to allow the ski to bend in a continuous
> curve.

> Except for the unusual mounting position aside, isn't Atomic doing
> essentially the same thing with the pre-drilled plates on some of the
> Beta's, which only take Atomic/ESS bindings.

> This side-mount thing sounds gimmicky.  Can you help me visualize it?

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by terry mors » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> This side-mount thing sounds gimmicky.  Can you help me visualize it?

Sure can. It's a low resolution photo, but you'll get the idea:

<http://www.terrymorse.com/ski/spilot.html>

Note the space under the toe piece to allow flexing of the ski under
foot. Interesting.

--
-terry
http://www.terrymorse.com/ski/

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by terry mors » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00


Quote:

> What was the top of its DIN setting range?

Two different bindings are available:

6-14 DIN (titanium) -
   only on the Scream Pilot 10 (108/70/101mm)

4-12 DIN (non-titanium) -
   on the Scream Pilot 10 and the Scream Pilot 8 (107/69/102mm)

 
 
 

Salomon Pilot Series

Post by Goog » Sat, 08 Jan 2000 04:00:00

Quote:
><http://www.terrymorse.com/ski/spilot.html>

Thanks for the photo, Terry. Have you seen these in person?  If so, 2
questions:

1 - Looks like their is just one mount each for the front and rear plates.
Is the idea that the plate can pivot as the ski flexes underneath?

2 - Do the toe and heel pieces also move in the plate/track as the ski
flexes?  Or is that just for adjusting boot position?

Thanks in advance.

- Dan in MT