salomon F9 3S How durable

salomon F9 3S How durable

Post by Rahul Pat » Fri, 14 Oct 1994 13:39:48


Got some questions on the F9 3s skis. I tried these skis for a few days
last year and absolutely loved them. They're great bump skis and have
amazing stability at higher speeds, so I thought I would buy a pair for
this coming season. I know these skis have a foam core so my question
is "How durable are these things? I'll be pounding on them on the bumps
so how will they last? Will they lose their quickness after while due to
the soft core or what? Also anybody have any ideas on where to get
them a cheap as possible. So far the best price I can find is $399

Any comments would really be appreciated
-Rahul

 
 
 

salomon F9 3S How durable

Post by Rita L » Sun, 16 Oct 1994 00:56:37

Quote:

>Got some questions on the F9 3s skis. I tried these skis for a few days
>last year and absolutely loved them. They're great bump skis and have
>amazing stability at higher speeds, so I thought I would buy a pair for
>this coming season. I know these skis have a foam core so my question
>is "How durable are these things? I'll be pounding on them on the bumps
>so how will they last? Will they lose their quickness after while due to
>the soft core or what?

I believe that they're reasonably durable.  I know a guy that has
gotten a couple of years of pounding out of the F9 3S, in "firm" eastern
conditions.  He is only about 150 lbs, so that may be a factor.

You might also consider some of the wood core Salomons.  I've been
plesantly surprised at how good my 9E 2Ss are in the bumps.

/*******************************************
 * Standard disclaimers apply.  Don't blame
 * my employer for any of  the above.  *****/

 
 
 

salomon F9 3S How durable

Post by Olddogg » Wed, 14 Dec 1994 14:25:32


Quote:
(Rita Leo) writes:

First voice:  I've had a pair of Force 9 3S Power 7s since January 1993,
and since that time have put in about 120 days in serious, aggressive
bumps at Winter Park & Mary Jane.  They're still going strong, but
admittedly I'm VERY cautious about rocks (the trick is over, not through).
 I have no plan to replace them before the end of the season (another 60
days or so).  For the record, I'm also on the light side  (140 pounds), so
maybe I'm not *** them, but I do give them a stiff workout three-four
days a week.  They should last for you, unless Colorado snow is unusually
friendly.  

Second voice: On the wood vs foam core debate,  truth is gang the core's
main job is to keep the top load bearing member from running into the
bottom load bearing member.  I a turn (ya-know that thing skiis are
supossed ta-do) the top skin is in compresision, and the bottom skin is in
elongation with the core seeing very high sheer forces close to these two
surfaces and next to none at the center axis.  When a ski fails or loses
camber, the fault is usually the fiber glass & polyester matrix has begun
to fail.  i.e. glass fibers are breaking at right angles to there fibers
main axis.   Now you may like the way wood skiis ski that wonderful I've
found some really neet skiis with wood cores also, but don't make to much
of the filler, with some different materials such as *** other
dampening materials some would be hard pressed to tell the difference.
Personally I like really wound up, jumpy skiis, like the Vertical ***,
Super Force 9 3S, and an exceptional old pair of Hexcel Split Tails, with
a honeycomb core.  Figure if aluminum honeycomb and foam are good enough
for the insides of a William's Formula One Tub it's good enough for my
skiis.

Rick & Betsy        


 
 
 

salomon F9 3S How durable

Post by Bruno Mel » Thu, 15 Dec 1994 03:06:39


Quote:
: (Rita Leo) writes:

: Figure if aluminum honeycomb and foam are good enough
: for the insides of a William's Formula One Tub it's good enough for my
: skiis.

I don't think that a F1 tub is designed to bend back and forth...
But if you like that kind of construction, the Hart slalom of a couple
of years ago had an aluminum honeycomb and foam core. I'm not sure about
the latest one.

bruno.

 
 
 

salomon F9 3S How durable

Post by Tom Johnsto » Thu, 15 Dec 1994 18:43:30

Quote:

> I don't think that a F1 tub is designed to bend back and forth...

I would think that with the extreme velocities and hard cornering,
an F1 "tub" would be subjected to very high G-forces, and would
be designed to bend quite a bit in order to maintain good handling.

Tom

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