groomed trails are for sissys?

groomed trails are for sissys?

Post by G.Rei » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 09:11:45


Since the park I live next to does not groom any of its trails, I might as
well claim  I am rougher and tougher because I get to plow through that
(also being the first one on the trails).
Make me ask a question though; Is there a ski type that is designed to
mostly ride on top of very thick snow (like if you were in the wild and had
to cross 4 feet of powder, or anything that you sink in a lot)? Maybe this
ski type is also not so much work to use in unbroken snow?
gr
 
 
 

groomed trails are for sissys?

Post by Jeff Potte » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 10:21:10

Quote:

> Since the park I live next to does not groom any of its trails, I might as
> well claim  I am rougher and tougher because I get to plow through that
> (also being the first one on the trails).
> Make me ask a question though; Is there a ski type that is designed to
> mostly ride on top of very thick snow (like if you were in the wild and had
> to cross 4 feet of powder, or anything that you sink in a lot)? Maybe this
> ski type is also not so much work to use in unbroken snow?

Wide, soft skis are nice for doing that.

You can get any of the new wide shorties also, like the old 1970's
Bushwackers.

Breaking trail is fun. 2nd time around is less ruff'n'tuff and much faster and
possibly more fun. It just gets better.

I have a hard time figuring out how to put in good poling lanes, tho. You can
ski a loop ten times and get good ski tracks going and the poling lane is
still a loose 2 feet deep. Ugh. My only cure is to ski in poling lanes to
create a final 4-lane trail. UGLY. But it works. It's so ugly I avoid it, but
I eventually like to get good poling. I suppose 20 laps breaks in a trail for
good poling.

Anikin says that when he was a kid in Siberia on cold days when there was no
school (when it got below -40F) the teacher would take all the kids on a
day-ski. They'd ski out breaking trail for 15 miles, eating frozen berries,
then ski back on their nice hard, fast trail. You get enuf school kids doing
that, you get easy gold medals. Not no *** stuff!

--


"Out Your Backdoor": Friendly Zine of Modern Folkways and Culture Revival
outyourbackdoor.com ... for a full line of alternative outdoor culture books,
bookstore & forum

 
 
 

groomed trails are for sissys?

Post by Paul Slavchenko and Lori Moor » Wed, 03 Jan 2001 14:29:19

Regarding skis for travelling over powder:  I was in Finland last spring
and saw enormous skis for sale, about 7-8 feet long and a good 9 inches
wide.  I thought that they were for ski jumping (never having seen ski
jumping skis up close) but I was assured that they were for travelling
through the woods over deep, untracked snow.  Later, speaking to some of
the Finns that I met, they told me that they have races through
untracked snow which use these skis.  Have never seen them in Canada.  I
think that they may have been Fischers, but I'm not sure.

Paul Slavchenko

Quote:

> Since the park I live next to does not groom any of its trails, I might as
> well claim  I am rougher and tougher because I get to plow through that
> (also being the first one on the trails).
> Make me ask a question though; Is there a ski type that is designed to
> mostly ride on top of very thick snow (like if you were in the wild and had
> to cross 4 feet of powder, or anything that you sink in a lot)? Maybe this
> ski type is also not so much work to use in unbroken snow?
> gr


 
 
 

groomed trails are for sissys?

Post by john_e_h.. » Thu, 04 Jan 2001 02:25:36

I like skiing both at ungroomed and groomed areas.  However I enjoy
skating or classic on groomed trails more than bushwhacking.

I live in a spot where we normally do not have skiable snow and the
closest x-c center with grooming and reliable snow is about 5 hours
away.  I did not feel like traveling this weekend and we had about 10
of snow over about an inch of old snow AND on frozen ground.  So what I
did was I skied at a local soccer field complex (lighted at night) of
three fields at different levels on a small hill.  The first few laps
were pretty tough in 10 of moist new snow.  I skied about 6 laps
(skating) then did double poling along the outside edges then as a
break I side-stepped the entire path (at about 8 intervals) to help
pack the snow better.  Then I skied countless additional laps.  After
several hours I had a track that was getting pretty nice.  The next day
I skied again and after 3 hours the trail was in great shape (10 wide
and firm) and equal to a good day at a touring center such as Prospect
Mtn or Salmon Hills.  V2 is highly useable on it and due to the weather
forecast it might last this entire week!  A week of being able to ski
after work WOW!  I am not sure of the distance but it consists of a
loop and a curvy out and back path with a couple small hills, it took
me (a sub 3 hour Keskianda 50k F skier) 6 minutes to do the course at
near race speed so I would expect the length is maybe 2k.

For those of you who live near reliable snow be thankful I cannot
imagine being able to normally ski after work or ski on the weekend
without significant traveling.
John

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groomed trails are for sissys?

Post by Runxoverru » Fri, 05 Jan 2001 13:14:33

Quote:
>Make me ask a question though; Is there a ski type that is designed to
>mostly ride on top of very thick snow (like if you were in the wild and had
>to cross 4 feet of powder

I would suggest using two snowboards and a herring bone stance.

Slope