Are my bindings still good?

Are my bindings still good?

Post by pigo » Sun, 03 Feb 2002 01:25:34



Quote:
> I think it's more common than the industry wants to let on.

Well, it did start out as a sport you know. Just because they have succeeded
in presenting skiing as an activity for all manner of mommies and whiners,
they have not been able to eliminate ALL risk. In some cases they have
managed to increase it (snomos). Among _skiers_ , possibility of injury is
part of the territory. All I ever did, that required medical attention, was
break my finger once and cut it open another.

It seems to me that the middle lever is most susceptible. Beginners like my
wife would have to be SOOOOOOOOOOOOO unlucky to get hurt at the speeds she
travels, advance skiers, while probably more likely to die, release more
readily too. I release about 2X/yr and it's warranted. because of speed and
or impact. Those in the middle don't seem to have the speed or experience to
get out of their own way sometimes. I've heard that "fighting" the fall
rather than just letting it happen sometimes is responsible for the injury.

pigo

 
 
 

Are my bindings still good?

Post by Fred Wol » Sun, 03 Feb 2002 10:19:12

Walt is right, high friction breaks , even while standing used to be a major
problem, a new pair of binding ai about 150 buckd, how many rentals is
that....

I now have a knee problem (not from skiing) and its a *** not being able
to ski, good health is priceless

FW

Quote:

> > I have a pair of Fischer skis I bought when I first started skiing in
> > 1985. The boots are still very good and fit well. The bindings are
> > Tyrolia 480. Ive recently been made aware that certain bindings are no
> > longer servicable based on age and level of "outdatedness". My
> > question is, despite thier age, are my bindings still ok? I live in
> > Wisconsin and the skiing I do is fairly short runs on fairly small
> > hills. The "black diamonds" in Wisconsin arent all that. Ive not gone
> > down a hill here I cant handle well enough, and I cant recall the last
> > time Ive fallen badly enough where my skis came off. I do some small
> > jumps off ramps of built up snow, nothing fancy. Im not looking to
> > replace my bindings, I dont want the expense right now, and I am
> > perfectly happy with these. But once the seed of doubt has been
> > planted, it has grown to make me wonder if I am still doing ok with
> > these bindings. I ski all of maybe 4-5 times a year, and I am not
> > thouroughly convinced I need to run out and buy new ones this year.

> > Any advice or comments are welcome. Thanks for taking the time out of
> > your day to acknowledge me.

> Much good advice from Markus and Richard above. To add my two cents,

> A) the list of indemnified bindings is at
> http://SportToday.org/
> I don't see Tyrolia 480 on it, but I didn't look very hard.  If your
> bindings are out of indemnification, I would strongly advocate replacing
> them.  It's not worth breaking your leg to save 50 to 100 bucks.

> B) Many people are confused about what "indemnification" means.  If you
> think that it means the binding manufacturer or the shop will do
> anything for you if you get injured, you're dead wrong.  What it really
> means is that if you get injured and you try to sue the shop, the
> binding manufacturer will pay the shop's legal defense (i.e. pay for
> lawyers to litigate against you)  Not exactly comforting, is it?  But
> still better than skiing on a binding that the manufacturer has declared
> obsolete.

> C)  Get your bindings release-checked periodically. Once a season is a
> good rule of thumb.  Note that no ski shop will do this unless they're
> on the indemnification list.

> D) If you think that because you ski on mickey-mouse midwestern
> molehills you can get away with cutting corners on the bindings, think
> again.  If you look at the epidemeology* of leg and knee injuries,
> you'll see that a lot of injuries come from falls at low speeds.
> Traverses, catwalks, even lift lines claim a lot of legs and knees.  The
> slow twisting fall where there's not enough speed to pop the binding,
> but still enough force to spiral a tibia or tear an ACL is one of the
> more common occurrences.  Modern bindings are designed to help prevent
> this type of injury (at least according to the manufacturer's hype).

> I've lost two skiing partners in the last two years to tibia fractures.
> One while skiing in a fog on an unfamiliar mountain where we were trying
> to go as slow as possible to avoid getting lost.  Another on a
> ridiculously small Michigan molehill - I think he got all of 20 feet of
> vertical before breaking his leg.  The bottom line is that any hill is
> big enough to break bones.  People get injured standing in the lift
> line!  Don't***around with marginal bindings.

> -Walt

> * see http://SportToday.org/
> --
> /////////////////////////////////////
> //
> /////////////////////////////////////


 
 
 

Are my bindings still good?

Post by So'n's » Fri, 08 Feb 2002 23:17:35

The more serious injuries in skiing  occur in rearward, twisting falls at
slow speed.  This allows for a lot of torque and force to be built up before
"failure" occurs.  That's why foward body position is so important...

NoaH

 
 
 

Are my bindings still good?

Post by Crashj Johnso » Sat, 09 Feb 2002 08:20:42


Quote:
> The more serious injuries in skiing  occur in rearward, twisting falls at
> slow speed.

<>
Errrrm, not exactly. The injuries in high speed collisions with fixed
objects are much more serious.
But there are many serious strain/sprain injuries in the case you mention.

Crashj 'rip your acl out' Johnson

 
 
 

Are my bindings still good?

Post by Kano Ak » Wed, 13 Feb 2002 22:20:36

Quote:



>> The more serious injuries in skiing  occur in rearward, twisting falls at
>> slow speed.

><>
>Errrrm, not exactly. The injuries in high speed collisions with fixed
>objects are much more serious.

Such as in collisions with the Earth?  I'm sorry couldn't resist!

--

The First Amendment is not limited to George Carlin's Seven Dirty Words!
Oppose Campaign Finance Reform in its current incarnation!

 
 
 

Are my bindings still good?

Post by Crashj Johnso » Thu, 14 Feb 2002 08:51:08


Quote:



> >> The more serious injuries in skiing  occur in rearward, twisting falls
at
> >> slow speed.

> ><>
> >Errrrm, not exactly. The injuries in high speed collisions with fixed
> >objects are much more serious.

> Such as in collisions with the Earth?  I'm sorry couldn't resist!

How retro of you. It has been known [personally to me] since at least 1962
that the earth is not fixed.

Crashj 'did it move for you too?' Johnson