bindings position

bindings position

Post by C » Tue, 01 Aug 2000 04:00:00


ok i have never really changed the position of my bindings since i got the
board and was wondering what the benifits or lack of there is to changing
the position and stance.

Campbell

 
 
 

bindings position

Post by Tomm » Tue, 01 Aug 2000 04:00:00

How about some clues as to what you have and what you are
looking for.

What is the board?  What is the current stance distance?  What
are the current angles?  Are the bindings centered front to rear
or set back, and if set back, by how much?

How well do you ride?  What do you ride -- pipe, park, slope-
style, cruising, carving, extreme, powder?

Hard, soft or step-ins?

Most important, out of the "what do you ride" list, what do you
want to do best, second best and third best.

Answer all of those questions and I'll give you one informed and
experienced view as to what our setup should be with the reasons
why.  So will ten other people; then you can choose.

-----------------------------------------------------------

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bindings position

Post by C » Wed, 02 Aug 2000 04:00:00

ok i have a Nidecker stardust 151, I got scott soft bindings with it and
havnt altered the distance since i got them. They are positioned with the
bindings sitting back and well im not to sure of the terminology but with
the 8 holes for the bindings to attatch to, mine are in the centre 4. the
bindings are set at an angle of 20 degrees with the forward and 10 with the
rear binding.

im an average rider - Im adicted to riding powder but will be hiking with
the board up a few of the easier mountains here in scotland once winter
comes.

im really after a set up that well is best for deep powder and heading a bit
extreme

anything i have missed out ?

Campbell


Quote:
> How about some clues as to what you have and what you are
> looking for.

> What is the board?  What is the current stance distance?  What
> are the current angles?  Are the bindings centered front to rear
> or set back, and if set back, by how much?

> How well do you ride?  What do you ride -- pipe, park, slope-
> style, cruising, carving, extreme, powder?

> Hard, soft or step-ins?

> Most important, out of the "what do you ride" list, what do you
> want to do best, second best and third best.

> Answer all of those questions and I'll give you one informed and
> experienced view as to what our setup should be with the reasons
> why.  So will ten other people; then you can choose.

> -----------------------------------------------------------

> Got questions?  Get answers over the phone at Keen.com.
> Up to 100 minutes free!
> http://www.keen.com


 
 
 

bindings position

Post by Tomm » Wed, 02 Aug 2000 04:00:00

OK, here goes.  20/10 is a pretty good set of all-round angles;
if you're comfortable with turns both ways, leave that part be
as it is. (Larger angles, more toward the front, will let you
carve more agressively down the fall line.  Racers and
"Eurocarvers" may using front/rear settings of 55/45 or more.
Problem is with angles that high most people can't jump, can't
use the rear foot for steering, can't ride fakie and can't
spin.  Lower angles, down to 0/0, make landing jumps, rear foot
steering and spining easier.  For true switch stance capability,
some even ride "duck" where the back foot is angles back, ie.,
front/back of 10/-10, but duck is *** the knees when
landing.  The very low angles make carving more difficult and
tend to be unstable at high speed.)

For all-round with  20/10 angles, I would set the distance
between binding centers at one inch more than the width of your
shoulders or hips, which ever is greater.  To maximize
spinnablity, increase the distance a bit; to improve carving
decrease the distance.

For powder and steep terrain, set the pair of bindings so that
the center of the space between them is one inch behind the
balance point of the board.  Setting the bindings behind the
board center will help keep tha nose up in powder and crud and
it gives more front of the board in front of the front foot to
keep in contact with the snow when do toe pivot turns on
extremely steep terrain.  Moving further back will ease keeping
the nose up in really light powder but will introduce stability
and turn initiation problems on hardpack.  (I run two inches
back on my big mountain board, but it is a 163cm so
proportionally you should start with a little less.)  For
spinning tricks, put the center of the bindings at the balance
center to create symmetrical weight distribution.

If you experiment with these factors a bit, you should learn a
lot about your board and your technique.  Of course the next
step is to own different boards, set up differently, for
different styles of riding.

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