OAKLAND CA public schools OK black english

OAKLAND CA public schools OK black english

Post by HChar831 » Sat, 21 Dec 1996 04:00:00


That be cool know what I'm sayin

"Compared to war, all other forms of human endeavor are reduced to insignificance."                                                                                              ----General Patton

 
 
 

OAKLAND CA public schools OK black english

Post by Matthew C. Norwoo » Sat, 21 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Can we leave this stuff out of rec.running?

Matt

 
 
 

OAKLAND CA public schools OK black english

Post by FolsomM » Sun, 22 Dec 1996 04:00:00

Quote:

>That be cool know what I'm sayin

A few months ago, there was a news item about a woman who had been
chastised by her employer for correcting a co-worker's use of "axe" for
"ask," which is common among blacks and not among whites.  I was struck by
the venomous contempt heaped on the supposedly "ignorant" misuse of
English practiced by many blacks.  Having read the book "The Story of
English" among others, I was under the impression that there was a
separate dialect "Black English" which had started up on the slave ships,
developed on the plantations and continued to evolve separately in a
largely separate black culture within the U.S.  I decided to research the
etymology of the use of "axe" for "ask" and I was surprised at what I
found:  From its first appearance in old english, "acsen" was used
interchangeably (by some English people) with "ascen," back in about 1000
AD.  Further "axe" was used to mean "ask" by Geoffrey Chaucer in
"Canterbury Tales."  Chaucer was not a disgraceful and ignorant
illiterate.  I think that everyone in the US needs to learn Standard
(American) English, but there is more to the contempt shown to Black
English than just a desire to ensure that everyone learns to communicate.

Mark Folsom, P.E.
Consulting Mechanical Engineer

 
 
 

OAKLAND CA public schools OK black english

Post by Reginald Fleming-Pete » Sun, 22 Dec 1996 04:00:00


Quote:

>>That be cool know what I'm sayin

>A few months ago, there was a news item about a woman who had been
>chastised by her employer for correcting a co-worker's use of "axe" for
>"ask," which is common among blacks and not among whites.  I was struck by
>the venomous contempt heaped on the supposedly "ignorant" misuse of
>English practiced by many blacks.  Having read the book "The Story of
>English" among others, I was under the impression that there was a
>separate dialect "Black English" which had started up on the slave ships,
>developed on the plantations and continued to evolve separately in a
>largely separate black culture within the U.S.  I decided to research the
>etymology of the use of "axe" for "ask" and I was surprised at what I
>found:  From its first appearance in old english, "acsen" was used
>interchangeably (by some English people) with "ascen," back in about 1000
>AD.  Further "axe" was used to mean "ask" by Geoffrey Chaucer in
>"Canterbury Tales."  Chaucer was not a disgraceful and ignorant
>illiterate.  I think that everyone in the US needs to learn Standard
>(American) English, but there is more to the contempt shown to Black
>English than just a desire to ensure that everyone learns to communicate.

>Mark Folsom, P.E.
>Consulting Mechanical Engineer

I agree with you. I mean what is really going on here. I think our
schools should really focus on teaching our children standard English
rather than somer dialect. Kids will learn the dialect on the streets
as they always have. It's really insulting to think that Black folks
just can not learn English like everyone else. The schools are in
effect saying we want to return to separate and unequal because blacks
cannot compete in the standard academic arena on par with other groups
so we have to give them their own (lower) standard. Leave "black
englsih" to the street. It time for our education system to stop
looking for the easy way out and start teaching ALL of our children to
be competitive.