Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by George Gratta » Thu, 24 Apr 2003 08:00:50


Sorry for the delay folks, and sorry for the length and very non-rec.running
style and tone of what follows. It's a first draft of a write up I'll be
using for another purpose. If you prefer something a bit less narrative
and/or self-involved, save yourself the trouble and skip this. This is,
essentially, a non-marathoner's account of what it's was like to do a
marathon. Other newbies may find useful tips, those suffering from insomnia
may find it quite helpful. :-)

Race Report: Boston Marathon, 2003; 107th Running, April 21,

Personal Stats:

Male, 33, 168lbs, first marathon (ran as unqualified runner with charity
organization?Leukemia and Lymphoma Society/Team in Training).

Running Background and Training:

Half-marathon time of about 1:58 several years ago, various 5k races, fell
out of anything other than recreational running prior to beginning training
for Boston in late October 2002. Training routine worked up to 30-50 miles a
week, with 20 miler on March 30 (3:30:45 by watch). Training was 3beset2 by
lousy winter weather for months and months and months, and, more
importantly, with persistent IT Band trouble in the middle months and
intermittent flare-ups thereafter. I was hoping for a 4:30:00 finish, though
I harbored secret, silly hopes of coming in at 3:59:59. (I have too many
friends and family members who did their first marathons in their early
twenties?.)

Reason for Running:

 Raising money for L&L Society to honor a friend who died last year (April
18) from Hodgkin1s. Matt had been an avid runner and he and his wife had
done several marathons?they1d been married nine months and he was 30 when he
died. She1d tried to run New York this fall but had to pull out at mile 8
due to severe IT trouble. So I was running for Matt, for her, and, of
course, for myself?to see if I could do this and how it suited me, to
undertake the journey of it because I could. (Also, provided a guilt free
reason not to work on my dissertation on any given day?.)

The Days/Night Before:

Good thing I got about 10 hours of sleep the night before the night before.
As everyone had told me it would be, Sunday night was, simply, pointless as
far as sleep was concerned. I probably got about four hours, max, broken up
across the night in fitful spurts.

 My wife and I had gone down to the Expo at the Hynes Convention Center on
Saturday to pick up my bib number, chip, and bag. Looked like an impressive
event?but I can1t stand crowds like that, milling around with no purpose. (I
know, I know: grouch.) I didn1t need to buy anything new, so I basically got
what I needed, gave everything the once over, and got out. But it was clear
that those who like these things were really, really enjoying themselves,
and that the event was well organized. (Interesting topical note: saw lots
of security around, and a few people wearing surgical masks, in what I can
only assume were nods to SARS-fears. Understandable, given the context.)

Did our own pasta dinners at home in Boston (really, I am a people-person?)
and otherwise just tried to hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Ran a fun/bittersweet
20 minutes on Sunday along the Charles?3my route2 all winter for the shorter
solo runs. Every time I run that river I1m reminded of how lucky I am to
live in Boston. (Shameless plug #1). Laid out all my gear (and, yeah, as a
first-timer, I had way too much of it) the night before (can1t stress enough
for other first-timers what a good idea/ritual this is), making good use of
the BAA1s ample and sturdy bag. Got the timing chip laced up on the shoe,
got the bib pinned to the singlet, got the name of my (and Matt1s and
Julie1s) alma matter pinned to the singlet and a nickname pinned to my hat.
Was very, very happy I1d done both of these the next day. Set my wife up
with the backpack full of stuff I thought I1d want/need waiting at the
finish, too, because, you know, the duplicate items in the BAA bag just
weren1t going to be enough.

Marathon Morning:

Set three alarms minutes apart. (There1s that *** mentality again?) Woke
up before the first one, of course, and remembered to shut them all off.
Last time I was up at 5am I simply hadn1t gone to bed yet, but I needed to
get downtown in time to board the buses between 6:30 and 7am, given my bib
number. (Found out later we could have, in fact, gone with the plan we
debated of just having my wife drop me off at the State Park in
Hopkinton?which we know well because I1ve done swimming races there---and
letting me catch one of the shuttles to Athlete1s Village. But we were too
nervous about the traffic, when the lots would fill up, etc. and had no idea
what to expect. Talking to folks during the morning and in the corrals it
was clear that there were plenty of spaces left there and in the other
shuttle spot until at least 9:30, and that the traffic wasn1t that bad. Oh,
well?it1s not like I was sleeping anyway.)

Remembering that I hadn1t eaten enough for the 20 miler, I went with as
hearty a breakfast as I could stand at that hour and given my nerves
(Cheerios with soymilk, toast with jam, half a banana.) Felt immediately too
full, which wouldn1t have been such a big deal except that once we got
downtown and I got on the bus, I ended up on one that had to be 85F. (It was
already obvious that the day was going to be warmer than had been
forecast?the cotton cloves I1d brought never got put on, the knit cap I had
was probably unnecessary even at that early hour. We1d been told we1d get a
cloudy day with highs around 60. Hah, hah?.) People began opening windows,
but the heat in there just wouldn1t dissipate (and, actually, nowhere near
as many people opened windows as I would have expected?I have a rep as a
fresh air freak, but I just don1t get why people need to be so warm all the
time?) By the time we were out on the Mass Pike heading toward Hopkinton,
people were visibly, well, swooning. I felt dizzy myself?was taking off my
over shirt, getting that sick, flushed feeling, etc. Horrible way to start
the day?and no doubt much of it was compounded by nerves, but knowing that
doesn1t always enable one to counteract it. Was very, very glad when we got
off that damn thing.

On the plus side, the buses are remarkably efficient in every other respect:
quick loading, quick departure, and a quick trip to the Athlete1s
Village?definitely the way to go for those coming to this race with no other
easy options. Like everything else I saw of BAA operations, these folks know
what they1re doing. (Second interesting topical note: sat next to a woman
here from Toronto, comically loathe though she was to admit it. We had an
interesting/amusing/disturbing conversation about SARS. Don1t think it
didn1t cross my mind?but she (and her friend) assured me that they had been
perfectly fine for at least 10 days, had no direct exposure, and had been
out of Toronto for a few days anyway. Good exercise in maintaining a healthy
perspective on risk assessment?)

Soon as we disembarked, I staked out a spot that was under the farthest tent
(there are two huge ones), partially in shade, partially in some sun. (I was
amazed at how many people just sprawled out in the sunlight the whole time.
No way?I could tell already it was going to warm out there, and there1s
notoriously little shade on this course.) Then, of course, hit the lines for
the porta-johns. Most of the rest of the morning consisted of being on lines
for these (hydrate, hydrate, hydrate!), or sneaking into the woods (until
the cops put a curiously vehement stop to that), or just lining up behind a
row of them with other fellas. Ladies?I seriously don1t know how you make it
through these kinds of events?kudos. (Slightly creepy observation: it was
clear on two of these trips to the line-up behind the porta-johns that at
least some folks had positioned themselves nearby to?observe.)

Only other things worth noting from this long, long period of waiting: I was
glad to find myself sitting next to a woman who had been newly diagnosed
with exercise-induced asthma and who was a bit unsure of how to use her
Albuterol inhaler. (She1d left her regular, far more expensive inhaler at
home, understandably). I produced my own Albuterol and we had a little
tutorial. I hope I was able to ease her mind?she seemed pretty nervous about
the situation. As someone who1s dealt with asthma since childhood, including
several hospitalizations while a child, and who1s now gotten it 3under
control2 down to the exercise-induced variety, I was happy to discover a
fellow-traveler.

Finally, it became pretty clear after an hour or so of walking around that I
had, in fact, chosen the wrong shorts to wear. They1d always been just a bit
too, uh, snug?but the truly comfortable pair I had were ridiculously large.
Vanity had staged an early victory over comfort, but comfort had been
tenacious enough to make sure I had packed the other pair with me. Since the
cops were now enforcing the 3No Flying Urine Zone2 in the woods (where I had
thought I could change), I was at a loss as to wear to go. (Changing in the
porta-john was not an option?they1d seen their best hours, and I didn1t feel
like carrying all those microbes all the way to Boston with me.) The good
folks in the medical tent were kind enough to let me duck in there and just
stand in the corner with my back turned and change. Not private, but private
enough. Balloon shorts were on, looking stupid, and feeling great. Kept
eating a bit, too?small banana and about half a bagel?felt a little hungry,
but didn1t want too much food in the stomach at this stage.

Went back to my spot, put on sunscreen and checked the supplies in the pack
I was carrying with me (Gus, Albuterol, cell phone, Imodium?had already
needed one that morning, so was glad to have them--, Chapstick, cash, ID,
house key, and some small pretzels). Also in this pack were a photo of Matt
and Julie and one of the ...

read more »

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by Leo » Thu, 24 Apr 2003 09:31:46

<snipped a wonderful report>

Thanks for the thoughts, George.
Run it, walk it, crawl it...hell, even in a car
26.2 miles is a daggone long way.
Running is a gift we give ourselves.

Thanks again for the report.
~L

Quote:

> I1m alive. I don1t have cancer. I haven1t buried a spouse. I ran
> (traversed?) the Boston Marathon. I raised money for a good cause. I had a
> great time and then a lousy time and then some kind of strangely
> transcendent time. I finished well after I had hoped. I love running, and I
> have the option to pursue that love or not as I wish, when so many others
> don1t. I really, really, enjoy running the 10 mile and half-marathon
> distances, and know I1ll do many of those in the future, along with 10Ks and
> 5Ks. My hip and knee hurt, but I had a one-hour professional massage today
> (Julie1s gift) and they1re feeling better?I1m able to do the stairs in our
> apartment building in some reasonable imitation of a normal person. In a day
> or so, I1ll lace up and go for a jog on the Charles, just to see how things
> feel. They'll feel good-- I'm alive.

> It was what it was. Thanks, Matt.


 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by Hal Shipma » Thu, 24 Apr 2003 15:48:14



.
.
<snip>
.
.
.
.
.
Do I need spoiler space for this?
.
.
.
.
.
Eh, better safe than sorry.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Quote:
> I crossed, according to my watch, at 5:04:11,

Congratulations, George!

I was trying to make some snarky comment about the length of the
write-up and your dissertation-in-progress, but it's 2:00am.  Make up
something and sign my name to it.

Hal.

I don't wear no Stetson
But I'm willing to bet, son
That I'm as big a Texan as you are
- Robert Earl Keen, "Amarillo Highway"
.
Remove the underscore in the address to reply by email.

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by Jonathan Sydenha » Thu, 24 Apr 2003 18:26:39

Now that was a tough one. Well done. Congratulations on*** in there.
BTW whatever you say about not running another, the second one is always
easier because you've been there before.
J

Quote:
> Sorry for the delay folks, and sorry for the length and very
non-rec.running
> style and tone of what follows. It's a first draft of a write up I'll be
> using for another purpose. If you prefer something a bit less narrative
> and/or self-involved, save yourself the trouble and skip this. This is,
> essentially, a non-marathoner's account of what it's was like to do a
> marathon. Other newbies may find useful tips, those suffering from
insomnia
> may find it quite helpful. :-)

> Race Report: Boston Marathon, 2003; 107th Running, April 21,

> Personal Stats:

> Male, 33, 168lbs, first marathon (ran as unqualified runner with charity
> organization >
> Running Background and Training:

> Half-marathon time of about 1:58 several years ago, various 5k races, fell
> out of anything other than recreational running prior to beginning
training
> for Boston in late October 2002. Training routine worked up to 30-50 miles
a
> week, with 20 miler on March 30 (3:30:45 by watch). Training was 3beset2
by
> lousy winter weather for months and months and months, and, more
> importantly, with persistent IT Band trouble in the middle months and
> intermittent flare-ups thereafter. I was hoping for a 4:30:00 finish,
though
> I harbored secret, silly hopes of coming in at 3:59:59. (I have too many
> friends and family members who did their first marathons in their early
> twentiesS.)

> Reason for Running:

>  Raising money for L&L Society to honor a friend who died last year (April
> 18) from Hodgkin1s. Matt had been an avid runner and he and his wife had
> done several marathons > died. She1d tried to run New York this fall but

had to pull out at mile 8
Quote:
> due to severe IT trouble. So I was running for Matt, for her, and, of
> course, for myself > undertake the journey of it because I could. (Also,

provided a guilt free

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> reason not to work on my dissertation on any given dayS.)

> The Days/Night Before:

> Good thing I got about 10 hours of sleep the night before the night
before.
> As everyone had told me it would be, Sunday night was, simply, pointless
as
> far as sleep was concerned. I probably got about four hours, max, broken
up
> across the night in fitful spurts.

>  My wife and I had gone down to the Expo at the Hynes Convention Center on
> Saturday to pick up my bib number, chip, and bag. Looked like an
impressive
> event > know, I know: grouch.) I didn1t need to buy anything new, so I
basically got
> what I needed, gave everything the once over, and got out. But it was
clear
> that those who like these things were really, really enjoying themselves,
> and that the event was well organized. (Interesting topical note: saw lots
> of security around, and a few people wearing surgical masks, in what I can
> only assume were nods to SARS-fears. Understandable, given the context.)

> Did our own pasta dinners at home in Boston (really, I am a
people-personS)
> and otherwise just tried to hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. Ran a
fun/bittersweet
> 20 minutes on Sunday along the Charles<3my route2 all winter for the
shorter
> solo runs. Every time I run that river I1m reminded of how lucky I am to
> live in Boston. (Shameless plug #1). Laid out all my gear (and, yeah, as a
> first-timer, I had way too much of it) the night before (can1t stress
enough
> for other first-timers what a good idea/ritual this is), making good use
of
> the BAA1s ample and sturdy bag. Got the timing chip laced up on the shoe,
> got the bib pinned to the singlet, got the name of my (and Matt1s and
> Julie1s) alma matter pinned to the singlet and a nickname pinned to my
hat.
> Was very, very happy I1d done both of these the next day. Set my wife up
> with the backpack full of stuff I thought I1d want/need waiting at the
> finish, too, because, you know, the duplicate items in the BAA bag just
> weren1t going to be enough.

> Marathon Morning:

> Set three alarms minutes apart. (There1s that *** mentality againS)
Woke
> up before the first one, of course, and remembered to shut them all off.
> Last time I was up at 5am I simply hadn1t gone to bed yet, but I needed to
> get downtown in time to board the buses between 6:30 and 7am, given my bib
> number. (Found out later we could have, in fact, gone with the plan we
> debated of just having my wife drop me off at the State Park in
> Hopkinton > letting me catch one of the shuttles to Athlete1s Village. But
we were too
> nervous about the traffic, when the lots would fill up, etc. and had no
idea
> what to expect. Talking to folks during the morning and in the corrals it
> was clear that there were plenty of spaces left there and in the other
> shuttle spot until at least 9:30, and that the traffic wasn1t that bad.
Oh,
> well >
> Remembering that I hadn1t eaten enough for the 20 miler, I went with as
> hearty a breakfast as I could stand at that hour and given my nerves
> (Cheerios with soymilk, toast with jam, half a banana.) Felt immediately
too
> full, which wouldn1t have been such a big deal except that once we got
> downtown and I got on the bus, I ended up on one that had to be 85F. (It
was
> already obvious that the day was going to be warmer than had been
> forecast > was probably unnecessary even at that early hour. We1d been
told we1d get a
> cloudy day with highs around 60. Hah, hahS.) People began opening windows,
> but the heat in there just wouldn1t dissipate (and, actually, nowhere near
> as many people opened windows as I would have expected > fresh air freak,

but I just don1t get why people need to be so warm all the
Quote:
> timeS) By the time we were out on the Mass Pike heading toward Hopkinton,
> people were visibly, well, swooning. I felt dizzy myself > over shirt,

getting that sick, flushed feeling, etc. Horrible way to start
Quote:
> the day > doesn1t always enable one to counteract it. Was very, very glad
when we got
> off that damn thing.

> On the plus side, the buses are remarkably efficient in every other
respect:
> quick loading, quick departure, and a quick trip to the Athlete1s
> Village > easy options. Like everything else I saw of BAA operations,
these folks know
> what they1re doing. (Second interesting topical note: sat next to a woman
> here from Toronto, comically loathe though she was to admit it. We had an
> interesting/amusing/disturbing conversation about SARS. Don1t think it
> didn1t cross my mind > perfectly fine for at least 10 days, had no direct

exposure, and had been

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> out of Toronto for a few days anyway. Good exercise in maintaining a
healthy
> perspective on risk assessmentS)

> Soon as we disembarked, I staked out a spot that was under the farthest
tent
> (there are two huge ones), partially in shade, partially in some sun. (I
was
> amazed at how many people just sprawled out in the sunlight the whole
time.
> No way > notoriously little shade on this course.) Then, of course, hit
the lines for
> the porta-johns. Most of the rest of the morning consisted of being on
lines
> for these (hydrate, hydrate, hydrate!), or sneaking into the woods (until
> the cops put a curiously vehement stop to that), or just lining up behind
a
> row of them with other fellas. Ladies > through these kinds of events >

clear on two of these trips to the line-up behind the porta-johns that at
Quote:
> least some folks had positioned themselves nearby toSobserve.)

> Only other things worth noting from this long, long period of waiting: I
was
> glad to find myself sitting next to a woman who had been newly diagnosed
> with exercise-induced asthma and who was a bit unsure of how to use her
> Albuterol inhaler. (She1d left her regular, far more expensive inhaler at
> home, understandably). I produced my own Albuterol and we had a little
> tutorial. I hope I was able to ease her mind > the situation. As someone

who1s dealt with asthma since childhood, including

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> several hospitalizations while a child, and who1s now gotten it 3under
> control2 down to the exercise-induced variety, I was happy to discover a
> fellow-traveler.

> Finally, it became pretty clear after an hour or so of walking around that
I
> had, in fact, chosen the wrong shorts to wear. They1d always been just a
bit
> too, uh, snug > Vanity had staged an early victory over comfort, but
comfort had been
> tenacious enough to make sure I had packed the other pair with me. Since
the
> cops were now enforcing the 3No Flying Urine Zone2 in the woods (where I
had
> thought I could change), I was at a loss as to wear to go. (Changing in
the
> porta-john was not an option > like carrying all those microbes all the

way to Boston with me.) The good
Quote:
> folks in the medical tent were kind enough to let me duck in there and
just
> stand in the corner with my back turned and change. Not private, but
private
> enough. Balloon shorts were on, looking stupid, and feeling great. Kept
> eating a bit, too > but didn1t want too much food in the stomach at this
stage.

> Went back to my spot, put on sunscreen and checked the supplies in the
pack
> I was carrying with me (Gus, Albuterol, cell phone, Imodium > needed one

that morning, so was glad to have them--, Chapstick, cash, ID,
Quote:
> house key, and some small pretzels). Also in this pack were a photo of
Matt
> and Julie and one of the prayer cards from his wake and funeral, and it
was
> good to look at them and know they were coming with me to Boston.

> The Start:

> They began lining us up in the corrals around 11am > no real rush here >

11:45 or so (no, not just the bandits), though they had to climb some of the

- Show quoted text -

Quote:
> crowd barriers to do so. (One good note for those who don1t know: there
are
> porta-johns lined up on some of the side streets along the corrals. Why
the
> good folks

...

read more »

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by George Gratta » Fri, 25 Apr 2003 00:26:47


Quote:
> Now that was a tough one.

Yeah, that post *was* too long, I know... :-)

 >Well done. Congratulations on*** in there.

Thank you.

Quote:
> BTW whatever you say about not running another, the second one is always
> easier because you've been there before.

You know, yesterday things like that sounded utterly insane. Today---well,
not so insane....

But, no: I've got a dissertation to write now and really think I can focus
in on and enjoy learning speed and strength and better training habits to
have some really good half-marathon experiences over the next few years.
Then, maybe....who knows? :-)

--
Shalom, Peace, Salaam

George Grattan

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by Roger 2 » Fri, 25 Apr 2003 02:21:51

Quote:

>Sorry for the delay folks, and sorry for the length and very
non-rec.running
>style and tone of what follows. It's a first draft of a write up I'll be
>using for another purpose. If you prefer something a bit less narrative
>and/or self-involved, save yourself the trouble and skip this. This is,
>essentially, a non-marathoner's account of what it's was like to do a
>marathon. Other newbies may find useful tips, those suffering from insomnia
>may find it quite helpful. :-)

>Race Report: Boston Marathon, 2003; 107th Running, April 21,

Thanks for your report and I'm glad you went into detail on other things you
have to do at Boston, since I am still thinking about it, but did I miss the
part where you talked about the jets flying overhead before the start of the
race?

When I heard that there were two jets at the start of the marathon, that
flew down the whole course, all I could think is I probably would have
driven out there just for that.

Roger

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by George Gratta » Fri, 25 Apr 2003 02:41:59


Quote:

> Thanks for your report and I'm glad you went into detail on other things you
> have to do at Boston, since I am still thinking about it, but did I miss the
> part where you talked about the jets flying overhead before the start of the
> race?

No, no-- I left that out, which just goes to show how much there was going
on that day to remember. Two F-18s (I believe) did indeed fly over the whole
course just prior to the starting gun.

Quote:

> When I heard that there were two jets at the start of the marathon, that
> flew down the whole course, all I could think is I probably would have
> driven out there just for that.

It was impressive, though perhaps more so for those who hadn't seen any such
thing before. I had, so while it was "cool" to see, it wasn't enough to cut
through the immediate pre-race adrenaline haze and make me focus on them too
much. :-)

As I understand it, the jets were officially there as "extra security" for
the air space along the course. I don't know much about how such things
work, but they had to be through the whole area so quickly I'm not sure how
much security that could truly have provided other than in a symbolic way,
in keeping with the themes of Patriots' Day. (Neat as such things are, I'm
not much for expensive symbolic gestures that provide more illusion than
substance of security, but I digress...) The airspace was packed with news
helicopters and more than a few small planes-- at least through the suburbs,
as I recall.

Wish I could have hitched a ride with them, though... :-)

--
Shalom, Peace, Salaam

George Grattan

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by Dot » Fri, 25 Apr 2003 02:47:27

Quote:

> Race Report: Boston Marathon, 2003; 107th Running, April 21,

George, Thanks for sharing your total Boston experience. Sounds like a
great day.

Dot

--
"Success is different things to different people"
-Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by Jonathan Sydenha » Fri, 25 Apr 2003 04:29:54


Quote:

> > Now that was a tough one.

> Yeah, that post *was* too long, I know... :-)

>  >Well done. Congratulations on*** in there.

> Thank you.

> > BTW whatever you say about not running another, the second one is always
> > easier because you've been there before.

> You know, yesterday things like that sounded utterly insane. Today---well,
> not so insane....

> But, no: I've got a dissertation to write now and really think I can focus
> in on and enjoy learning speed and strength and better training habits to
> have some really good half-marathon experiences over the next few years.
> Then, maybe....who knows? :-)

> --
> Shalom, Peace, Salaam

> George Grattan

It took our group coach 10 years to find the motivation to do his second
marathon. What I like about marathons is that marathon training makes ?
marathons and 10ks seem like a quick trot  down to the pub, and the
camaraderie that develops in the training group. I've enjoyed the first 30 k
of each of the 'thons I've run but mostly the rush that hits me as I cross
the line.
I started running for weight control and actually marathons are not good in
those terms: during the two week taper and the post 'thon recovery period I
easily put on weight (a stone in five 'thons over the last two years).
So I'd agree that marathoning is a mixed blessing, and it certainly takes a
chunk out of whatever else you're doing.
But then maybe ... asn you say ... who knows?
:-)
J
 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by Doug Burk » Fri, 25 Apr 2003 06:33:54

Great report George.......although somewhat brief and skimpy on the
details...........wink.
 Seriously, great run, great accomplishment and it sounds like you had a great
day, something to be really proud of.
Doug Burke

 
 
 

Race Report: Boston (Post is Long, Too Long, Way, Way, Too Long...)

Post by nina stoessinge » Fri, 25 Apr 2003 07:45:04

Quote:

> Race Report: Boston Marathon, 2003; 107th Running, April 21,

thank you for the long report, George, yes i read it :)  and really loved it (it
was sometimes puzzling because some half sentences seemed to be missing or mixed
up?) - as i am still making up my mind as to whether or not to run (i first typed
"attempt", but, "do or do not, there is no try" :) ) a marathon sometime soon, i
am very hungry for all these verbose first time reports. yours was outstanding.
thanks and a big congrats. you're tough.

cheers,
nina