A few beginner's questions

A few beginner's questions

Post by w.beck.. » Mon, 23 Oct 2006 20:04:39


Hey everyone. I'm about to begin a running regimen, and I've got a few
questions. Just about every question I had was answered by the
wonderful beginner's FAQ, but a few persist.

1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?
I've been reading alot about foot types, and I think that I've
determined that I'm an overpronator, but that still leaves me pretty
much clueless as to which particular shoe from any number of brands
would be the right one for me. My budget is tight, and the discount
shoe stores that I've visited don't exactly have the most informative
staffs. What can I do on my own to find the right fit? What should I
look for, and what brands should I look for as a "value-conscious"
runner?

2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
regimen? How should I combat these and keep myself on my plan? I'm
already planning on using the iPod Nano + Nike sensor kit, which I know
will help me as that kind of self-documentation and tracking of
statistics really helped me lose 65 pounds in the past year (through
dieting alone). Now that I'm adding excersise to the dieting, I know it
will help to track that as well, but what other measures can be taken
to keep me on the straight and narrow with my running?

3.) Urban sidewalks or treadmill at a gym? I may or may not be able to
afford a gym membership, so this question might be moot, but is there a
specific advantage or disadvantage to either of these that I should be
aware of?

4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear," like the
t-shirts made of *** fibers that supposedly keep you dry and cool?
Are they a worthwhile investment? Or are my cotton t-shirts fine? Same
with socks...

Thanks in advance,

Will

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Miss Anne Thro » Mon, 23 Oct 2006 21:49:44

The first three are non questions.

Jogging costumes however, are a must.
They give me a brighter target to aim towards.

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Al Bund » Mon, 23 Oct 2006 22:50:24

Quote:

> Hey everyone. I'm about to begin a running regimen, and I've got a few
> questions. Just about every question I had was answered by the
> wonderful beginner's FAQ, but a few persist.

> 1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?
> I've been reading alot about foot types, and I think that I've
> determined that I'm an overpronator, but that still leaves me pretty
> much clueless as to which particular shoe from any number of brands
> would be the right one for me. My budget is tight, and the discount
> shoe stores that I've visited don't exactly have the most informative
> staffs. What can I do on my own to find the right fit? What should I
> look for, and what brands should I look for as a "value-conscious"
> runner?

> 2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
> regimen? How should I combat these and keep myself on my plan? I'm
> already planning on using the iPod Nano + Nike sensor kit, which I know
> will help me as that kind of self-documentation and tracking of
> statistics really helped me lose 65 pounds in the past year (through
> dieting alone). Now that I'm adding excersise to the dieting, I know it
> will help to track that as well, but what other measures can be taken
> to keep me on the straight and narrow with my running?

> 3.) Urban sidewalks or treadmill at a gym? I may or may not be able to
> afford a gym membership, so this question might be moot, but is there a
> specific advantage or disadvantage to either of these that I should be
> aware of?

> 4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear," like the
> t-shirts made of *** fibers that supposedly keep you dry and cool?
> Are they a worthwhile investment? Or are my cotton t-shirts fine? Same
> with socks...

> Thanks in advance,

> Will

The shoes are the most important item on your list. Do not buy cheap
department store type shoes. Even name brands at discount stores are
frequently second line shoes. By that I mean they are not as sturdy and
won't last as long or perform as well. And by performance, I mean
injury prevention. Seek out a runner's store. (Yes, of course get some
decent athletic socks as they are cheap.)

Just wear something that's comfortable and loose. Save your money on
gym membership and run outside. It saves money and burns more energy.
If possible, just go out your front door rather than drive someplace. I
prefer to go out a certain distance and back home rather than run a
loop around the neighborhood. If I go out five miles I know I have five
to run back without any walking.

The biggest problem people have is underestimating their potential for
distance. At the same time, many try to start off too fast and risk
injury and fatigue. Start off for a few days at a short distance and
then start adding time or distance.

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Frank Boettche » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 00:40:36


Quote:
>Hey everyone. I'm about to begin a running regimen, and I've got a few
>questions. Just about every question I had was answered by the
>wonderful beginner's FAQ, but a few persist.

>1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?
>I've been reading alot about foot types, and I think that I've
>determined that I'm an overpronator, but that still leaves me pretty
>much clueless as to which particular shoe from any number of brands
>would be the right one for me. My budget is tight, and the discount
>shoe stores that I've visited don't exactly have the most informative
>staffs. What can I do on my own to find the right fit? What should I
>look for, and what brands should I look for as a "value-conscious"
>runner?

>2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
>regimen? How should I combat these and keep myself on my plan? I'm
>already planning on using the iPod Nano + Nike sensor kit, which I know
>will help me as that kind of self-documentation and tracking of
>statistics really helped me lose 65 pounds in the past year (through
>dieting alone). Now that I'm adding excersise to the dieting, I know it
>will help to track that as well, but what other measures can be taken
>to keep me on the straight and narrow with my running?

>3.) Urban sidewalks or treadmill at a gym? I may or may not be able to
>afford a gym membership, so this question might be moot, but is there a
>specific advantage or disadvantage to either of these that I should be
>aware of?

>4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear," like the
>t-shirts made of *** fibers that supposedly keep you dry and cool?
>Are they a worthwhile investment? Or are my cotton t-shirts fine? Same
>with socks...

>Thanks in advance,

>Will

Shoes most important, do it right, others have given good advice.

The rest, whatever floats your boat.  It has been my experience that
the greatest danger to a beginning program is your own eventual
boredom and quitting the program because of it.  If fancy gadgets,
clothes, ability to run in the dry in bad weather, posting here,
competing in runs because of the comradrie, joining a running club,
becoming a cross country booster, reading the much ridiculed "Runners
World"  or anything else that maintains your interest until you get to
the point that you can't do without it, then that's what you should
do.  It really is that simple.

Frank

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by AWilliamso » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 01:17:48


Quote:
>My budget is tight, and the discount
>shoe stores that I've visited don't exactly have the most informative
>staffs.

I wouldn't know what shoe to recomend for you but
www.holabirdsports.com is an awesome company.  I've been ordering from
them for fif*** years.
~~~Powering the Elite Athlete in You~~~~
http://SportToday.org/

A.Williamson

http://SportToday.org/

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by AWilliamso » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 01:21:13

On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 08:07:59 -0700, Beginning runner

Quote:

>Now I'll sit back and let the experienced runners pick my advice apart.

I think your advice is great!  
~~~Powering the Elite Athlete in You~~~~
http://www.shaklee.com/main/prodNutSports

A.Williamson

http://www.shaklee.net/healanthart

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Charlie Pendej » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 02:09:14

Quote:

> I wouldn't know what shoe to recomend for you but
> www.holabirdsports.com is an awesome company.

I like holabird but the OP, as an absolute beginner, should certainly
go to a running specialty store the first time.

If the store and its employees are good, he'll get help with
determining what size running shoe he really needs (in my case a full
size up, in most models, from street shoes); what type (neutral,
stability, motion control) he requires; suggestions for suitable
models; and most importantly the ability to try on a variety of shoes
before purchase, to see what fits and is comfy to run in.

OP, don't spend however much on your Ipod/Nike gizmo then cheap out and
try to save ten bucks on the shoes!  Shoes are cheap - the $80 or so
you'll spend will last you many months, much cheaper than the gym
membership you're contemplating.  Save the $$ by not buying special
clothes until the length of your runs means you're uncomfortable in
cotton - and I agree with Al, socks are probably the first thing you'll
want to upgrade, but even then whatever you've got is likely fine at
first.

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Dot » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 03:03:56

Quote:

> Hey everyone. I'm about to begin a running regimen, and I've got a few
> questions. Just about every question I had was answered by the
> wonderful beginner's FAQ, but a few persist.

> 1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?

As already mentioned, go to a quality running store (not the mall kind)
and get properly fitted by qualified folks. That's no guarantee though.
If you don't have such a shoe store, you might check if there's
qualified person (like a physical therapist that works with runners) who
can give a gait analysis. The money you spend on getting the right shoe
is more than saved in doctors' bills and pain and suffering. (FWIW, in
recent history, I've had some foot problems when I was wearing shoes
from mall store (no running stores near me), then found a running shoe
store, they fitted me; then had more problems, PT analyzed my gait and
feet and fitted me plus a bunch of exercises; happily running now.)

Get good shoes before you worry about anything else like gadgets and
clothes.

Quote:

> 2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
> regimen?

Keep it fun - whatever it takes. If you need gadgets to have fun or like
to go wander through the woods with no gadgets - just do it. Whether you
like to track every little detail or just run - just do it. Some people
like detail to keep them motivated; others like the escape from detail.
Some like the structure of a detailed schedule; others feel chained.

If there's a day you're supposed to run and don't feel like it, just put
your shoes on, step out the door, and take a couple steps. That's
usually the hardest part.

Quote:

> 3.) Urban sidewalks or treadmill at a gym? I may or may not be able to
> afford a gym membership, so this question might be moot, but is there a
> specific advantage or disadvantage to either of these that I should be
> aware of?

If you have some park trails near you might be best for feet and are
more likely to not be slanted so much - and may be a lot more enjoyable.
Where I am the paved roads and sidewalks are slanted to provide
drainage, which means in winter when the sidewalks are icy, we slide
into traffic. Not all places slant their sidewalks to the extent they do
here. If no trails and you can find a bike path or whatever separated
from traffic, that's a plus. They're safer and using not sloped sideways
like sidewalks and roads.

That said, tm do provide the advantage of being able to adjust
topography, as long as it's between -3 and +15% and they don't have the
sideways slanting of roads and sidewalks.

Quote:

> 4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear," like the
> t-shirts made of *** fibers that supposedly keep you dry and cool?
> Are they a worthwhile investment? Or are my cotton t-shirts fine? Same
> with socks...

For getting started, whatever you have is fine. I ran in cutoffs (or
sweats in winter) and cotton t's for years. As your runs get longer or
you run in more varied weather, you'll likely find some of the wicking
fabrics beneficial. Depending on where you are, temperatures and other
weather conditions, replacing cotton socks with wool or technical
materials may be the first thing - at least for me it was. If you're
concerned about "dry and cool" rather than "warm and dry" in late Oct, I
suspect you're in a warm environment (although we're having warm, for
us, temps).

You can find some low-priced stuff at Wal-Mart or Target (I've heard, no
Targets in AK). But I tend to shop
www.sierratradingpost.com
www.campmor.com
for closeouts on quality gear.

Sometimes some good buys can be found at
http://SportToday.org/
http://SportToday.org/

Enjoy your new found hobby.

Dot

--
"Dream big and dare to fail." --- Norman Vaughan

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Twittering On » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 07:09:24

"I prefer to go out a certain distance and back home rather than run a
loop around the neighborhood. If I go out five miles I know I have five
to run back without any walking. "

How do you get 5 miles out?

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Twittering On » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 07:21:10

Quote:

> Hey everyone. I'm about to begin a running regimen, and I've got a few
> questions. Just about every question I had was answered by the
> wonderful beginner's FAQ, but a few persist.

> 1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?

When you put them on in the store, do they
feel good, make you want to jet out the door
on fleet foo?  Besides some basic good advice
on your pronation issues, I would get a show
that cushions well the ball of your foot, and
had a nice "roll" feeling, does not have you sitting
on your heels.

 What should I

Quote:
> look for, and what brands should I look for as a "value-conscious"
> runner?

I found the Asics Nimbus a really good shoe
to get me running comfortably, with not much
experience on distance.  It cushioned my foot
really well, and gave me a nice bounce, making
running feel more effortless.

In general, Asics will give you a good shoe,
so find the right one for you.

Quote:
> 2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
> regimen?  what other measures can be taken
> to keep me on the straight and narrow with my running?

Set a routine, eg, every other day, or 5 days/week or
whatever, and just Do It those days, andrecognize
the value of rest days, and do not feel guilty about that.

Quote:
> 3.) Urban sidewalks or treadmill at a gym? I may or may not be able to
> afford a gym membership, so this question might be moot, but is there a
> specific advantage or disadvantage to either of these that I should be
> aware of?

I personally prefer treadmills, because it keeps my
from better, and I can track my pace and milage
perfectly. For me, running on the road tends to
let me fall into slopppy form, and I do not keep
my pace as well. But running outside is certainly the
preferred method of any serious runner. I don't like
the stop and start element of city running, however,
my only real option.

Quote:
> 4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear," like the
> t-shirts made of *** fibers that supposedly keep you dry and cool?
> Are they a worthwhile investment? Or are my cotton t-shirts fine? Same
> with socks...

Tshirts are fine.
But I really recommend running tights.
It makes running and your body-sense in space
so much cleaner.

I never ran in tights till the last 2 years,
and now I hate running in anything else.

Tights and sweatshirt are good options for
cold weather, too.

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Patric » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 08:46:33


Quote:
> 1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?
> What should I look for, and what brands should I look for as a
> "value-conscious" runner?

I am not convinced that any particular shoe can prevent injury.  A
specialty running store will have a larger selection which may better
your chances of finding a show you like, but not necessarily one that
will protect from injury (perhaps I'm going to the wrong stores, but no
running store has ever followed up with me after a sale to ask if I
liked the shoe or got injured).  Someone please correct me if the
evidence says otherwise; I do not wish to give bad advice.  Particularly
for the sake of those on a tight budget, shelling out for expensive
shoes of dubious utility seems imprudent.

After my own literature searches, I more or less concur with the
introduction to this:
http://SportToday.org/

Starting out easy and not trying to do more than you can handle would
seem to be the best advice on injury prevention.

Quote:
> 2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
> regimen? How should I combat these and keep myself on my plan?

Just get out there every day.  If you don't feel like running, walk.
Hopefully a little activity will get your *** flowing, and then you
will want to do a little running, but any activity is better than none.
Go for time; don't worry about distance or speed.

Quote:
> 4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear,"

Completely non-essential.  I've found the synthetic materials do work
more or less as advertised, but mine tend to smell more than cotton.  If
your shirts get sweaty and uncomfortable, consider upgrading.

--

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Charlie Pendej » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 09:24:07

Quote:

> I've found the synthetic materials do work more or less
> as advertised, but mine tend to smell more than cotton.

A laundry detergent called "Sport Wash" will take care of that.
 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Dot » Tue, 24 Oct 2006 14:59:39

Quote:


>>1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?

>>What should I look for, and what brands should I look for as a
>>"value-conscious" runner?

> I am not convinced that any particular shoe can prevent injury.

Correct. However, the wrong shoe can cause injury. And that's the
probability people try to minimize by going to a decent store or somehow
having a professional analysis. I truly believe I owe my running today
to my PT and the exercises he gave me as well as shoe recommendations.
(My GP had told me to give up running 'cuz of foot problems, and he's a
former runner - but GP's aren't trained in foot problems.)

Dot

--
"Dream big and dare to fail." --- Norman Vaughan

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by Robert Grumbi » Wed, 25 Oct 2006 00:51:34


Quote:

>Hey everyone. I'm about to begin a running regimen, and I've got a few
>questions. Just about every question I had was answered by the
>wonderful beginner's FAQ, but a few persist.

>1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?

  Mostly already answered.  Not mentioned enough: The shoes should
be comfortable.

Quote:
>2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
>regimen? How should I combat these and keep myself on my plan? I'm
>already planning on using the iPod Nano + Nike sensor kit, which I know
>will help me as that kind of self-documentation and tracking of
>statistics really helped me lose 65 pounds in the past year (through
>dieting alone). Now that I'm adding excersise to the dieting, I know it
>will help to track that as well, but what other measures can be taken
>to keep me on the straight and narrow with my running?

  The main thing is to figure out what would interfere with you
getting out regularly, and then solve that problem.  As you're a
documentation/statistics sort, the gizmos are a good thing. If
the gadgetry doesn't already include heart rate monitoring, that's
a good one to add.

  What else would interfere with getting out regularly?  Are you
weather-averse?  Variable schedule? ...  There are answers to them
all.

  The biggest thing that would interfere with you getting out regularly
is actually none of those.  Most beginners get nailed by trying to
do too much, too fast, too soon.  Recovery time is where the training
effect actually occurs.  Ignoring recovery time is why the first
2 weeks are the highest injury rate time for runners.  

Quote:
>3.) Urban sidewalks or treadmill at a gym? I may or may not be able to
>afford a gym membership, so this question might be moot, but is there a
>specific advantage or disadvantage to either of these that I should be
>aware of?

  Treadmills will carry your feet back for you, which is a disadvantage
as it encourages bad form (and thence injuries).  Concrete sidewalks have
the disadvantage of being harder on your joints.  Treadmills have the
advantage of being all weather surfaces.  Sidewalks have the advantage
of giving more variable and interesting routes.

Quote:
>4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear," like the
>t-shirts made of *** fibers that supposedly keep you dry and cool?
>Are they a worthwhile investment? Or are my cotton t-shirts fine? Same
>with socks...

  I ran for years in whatever junk I had around, which meant all of
it was cotton.  Where the tech fabrics come in most important is if
you're running in extreme weather, or you're running for particularly
long times (say over an hour).  For beginner-oriented running, 30 minutes
of walk-run with increasing run fractions, the reasons I wear non-cotton
more these days don't apply (to me either as I'm only doing 30-ish minutes
myself).

--
Robert Grumbine http://SportToday.org/~bobg/ Science faqs and amateur activities notes and links.
Sagredo (Galileo Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too much
evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less appreciated than they
would be had they been presented in a more abstruse manner." Two New Sciences

 
 
 

A few beginner's questions

Post by shinypenny0.. » Wed, 25 Oct 2006 02:14:03

Quote:

> Hey everyone. I'm about to begin a running regimen, and I've got a few
> questions. Just about every question I had was answered by the
> wonderful beginner's FAQ, but a few persist.

> 1.) How can I figure out which pair of running shoes is right for me?
> I've been reading alot about foot types, and I think that I've
> determined that I'm an overpronator, but that still leaves me pretty
> much clueless as to which particular shoe from any number of brands
> would be the right one for me. My budget is tight, and the discount
> shoe stores that I've visited don't exactly have the most informative
> staffs. What can I do on my own to find the right fit? What should I
> look for, and what brands should I look for as a "value-conscious"
> runner?

Don't skimp on shoes, especially if you think you have pronation
issues. Personally, I would never diagnose my own pronotion issue... I
would leave that up to an expert, if not a PT than at least a trained
expert at a running shoe store.

Try the sneaks on while wearing the same socks you intend to run in.
Bulky socks take up more room than lightweight, thin ones.

Go to the store late in the day, when your feet are widest. Your feet
will swell quite a lot while running, so you need a lot of room in the
toe box area in particular.

Make sure the shoes are comfortable - nothing pinching or rubbing.

Quote:
> 2.) What pitfalls should I be aware of in terms of not keeping my
> regimen? How should I combat these and keep myself on my plan?  I'm
> already planning on using the iPod Nano + Nike sensor kit, which I know
> will help me as that kind of self-documentation and tracking of
> statistics really helped me lose 65 pounds in the past year (through
> dieting alone). Now that I'm adding excersise to the dieting, I know it
> will help to track that as well, but what other measures can be taken
> to keep me on the straight and narrow with my running?

I have an ipod nano + nike too - I love it.  Like you, I'm a
documentation nut. This makes it so much easier to keep track of
progress (or lack of progress - a few weeks ago I noticed that my
progress was going backwards. Turned out that I was coming down with a
virus!

I know that for me if I don't go out nearly every single day, I'll
never get back into the habit. For me, it takes 6 weeks for a habit to
stick. However, if I were to run each and every day, I'd quickly injure
myself! But if I don't go out every day, I won't establish the habit.
It's a Catch 22.

So this time around, I am walking instead. I started three months ago
walking one hour 5 times a week minimum (burning about 370 calories
each session, according to my ipod). It is now a habit and on days when
I don't walk, I really miss it. Therefore I'd say, if you are like me
and you find you have a hard time establishing a habit if you are only
running 2-3 times a week, instead of risking injury by going out more
often, try walking instead on the other days of the week.

About once a week now, I'll jog/walk for 30 min. I wasn't going to
attempt jogging for a full year, BUT it's hard not to want to,
especially on days when I can only squeeze in 30 minutes, or I'm
feeling good and the weather is perfect and i get in this groove going
downhill and the next thing you know, I'm jogging not walking!

I can now jog about 15-20 minutes straight, at an embarassingly slow
pace, but it's a start. However,  I need to take the next day off to
fully recover. And I need to stretch A LOT. Every single day. Yoga has
been great, because it's helping me learn where my muscle imbalances
are - the imbalances that ultimately led to my previous back problems &
piriformis syndrome.

Injury is not fun and it is the quickest way to derail the best
intentions, so the best advice I can give you is to take it slow and
set really modest goals for yourself, and make sure you incorporate
daily stretching into your routine. It's easy with the nike sport kit
to get carried away - you want to hear Lance congratulate you on
another PR. Remember that your mind and ego will be ready to fly, long
before your joints are conditioned to handle the stress.

Quote:
> 3.) Urban sidewalks or treadmill at a gym? I may or may not be able to
> afford a gym membership, so this question might be moot, but is there a
> specific advantage or disadvantage to either of these that I should be
> aware of?

Others already answered this, but if you stick to outdoors, try to stay
off the sidewalks if you can because the concrete is very *** your
joints. When I jog, I jog along the gully of the road, instead of on
the sidewalk, whenever I can. Also alternate your direction so you are
not always running in the same direction because sidewalks and roads
are slanted. (This applies even if you are just walking too).

And hills are wonderful conditioners, so don't avoid them. I read
somewhere recently that going uphill conditions the heart and lowers
*** pressure, while going downhill improves your *** sugar profile.

Quote:
> 4.) How essential is it that I have special "running-wear," like the
> t-shirts made of *** fibers that supposedly keep you dry and cool?
> Are they a worthwhile investment? Or are my cotton t-shirts fine? Same
> with socks...

Personally I would invest in running-wear before investing in a gym
membership. Yes, you can run in cotton but the *** fibers are well
worth the additional expense. This applies to walkers too. I am far
more comfortable walking in running wear than in cotton. For example,
cotton shorts will rub and bunch up on your thighs; nylon running
shorts do not and they also have the advantage of being able to dry
very quickly. You can invest in one single pair and rinse it out every
night. High-tech tees are less of a necessity IMO, unless you happen to
sweat a lot.

Here's what I'd do: I'd set up a reward system. If you keep with your
program for two weeks straight, then go out and splurge on a pair of
nylon shorts or tights.  Make it to a month, reward yourself with a
pair of high-tech socks (far superior to cotton, IMO.. ). If you are in
a cooler environment, a windbreaker is a great investment. Cuz there's
nothing more miserable than being out in the wind wearing cotton, or
getting stuck in a downpour.

I do find for me that it's true that if I have the "right" exercise
wear, I'm far more likely not to use the weather as an excuse - "it's
too windy! it's too cold!" And to that end, the investment for me is
worth it.

jen