newbie question-didn't see this in FAQ

newbie question-didn't see this in FAQ

Post by Scott Kreit » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00


Hello everyone,
    I just purchased a HRM and want to incorp. it into my training.  I
thought I'd use the 200-(0.5age) rule.  I'm 25yrs. old, so 65-75% of my Max
is ~122-141.  At this level I'm moving (if you can call it that) *extremely*
slowly- like 12.30 mile.  Is there a point where you just run in a comfort
zone you perceive, and not listen to rigid HR limits?  I'd like to think my
HRM is more than an expensive watch, but I don't know if I'm getting any
fitness gains from moving this slowly.
Thanks for you help, looking forward to hearing from you.
Best,
-Scott.

--
reply to sfk at brown dot edu

 
 
 

newbie question-didn't see this in FAQ

Post by hoffma » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
> I'd like to think my HRM is more than an expensive watch,
> but I don't know if I'm getting any fitness gains from moving
> this slowly.

Forget all the "your age minus 220, multiplied
by .756, divided by the square root of 223"
type formulas, none of which are worth anything
whatsoever for practical purposes.   What you
do is this:

Go to a running track or find a really flat
trail to run on for a mile or two. Then you
resolve to determine three or four things.
Do 4 trial runs (not necessarily on the same
day, of course) and determine your average
heart rate in each of these 4 trial runs. Then
use those figures as your basis for training.

(1) Slow-casual running pace which you can
keep up for several miles. You should be able
to talk easily and joke around with a running
partner at this pace. This will be like a "recovery
run" pace.. You can forget this if you don't usually
run at a really slow pace for recovery.

(2) Brisk pace which you keep up for only
3-5 miles (i.e. a brisk 5km training pace).
This should be just fast enough so that
you really dont want to engage in conversation
when your doing this. But not a race pace.

(3) An extremely brisk run. Calculate your
heart rate when doing 1 mile intervals. The
pace should be such that you can repeat
3-5 intervals.

(4) Calculate your average heart rate for
high intensity intervals. Example 400, 800
or 1km intervals; whichever you would
be more likely to do.

This is basically the, go-by-feel method
and it works better than any formula does
for determining your own heart rate limits
at various intensities..

Then... whenever you want to do a training
session, be it a slow recovery jog, a brisk tempo
run, or high intensity intervals; you will thusly know
what the appropriate heart rate range is for that
session.

And might I point out the obvious... that since
you already have a HRM, theres no reason  that
you can't attempt to figure out your maximum
heart rate. It can actually be pretty hard to get
your heart rate to its very very maximum.. but
usually you get get close enough; ceartainly more
reliable than the 220-age type formulas.

 
 
 

newbie question-didn't see this in FAQ

Post by Phil Margolie » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00

Quote:

> Forget all the "your age minus 220, multiplied
> by .756, divided by the square root of 223"
> type formulas

I have never heard of that one before. Are you sure about this? My MHR
is -9 using this formula.

Phil " ;-) " Margolies

 
 
 

newbie question-didn't see this in FAQ

Post by Scott Kreit » Fri, 02 Apr 1999 04:00:00

mine is -9.8.
scott "who's not THAT new to running-or that fit" kreitz

--
reply to sfk at brown dot edu

Quote:


>> Forget all the "your age minus 220, multiplied
>> by .756, divided by the square root of 223"
>> type formulas

>I have never heard of that one before. Are you sure about this? My MHR
>is -9 using this formula.

>Phil " ;-) " Margolies

 
 
 

newbie question-didn't see this in FAQ

Post by Stephen Mulri » Sat, 03 Apr 1999 04:00:00



Quote:

>> Forget all the "your age minus 220, multiplied
>> by .756, divided by the square root of 223"
>> type formulas
>I have never heard of that one before. Are you sure about this? My MHR
>is -9 using this formula.

That must mean it's slowly sucking the *** round your body.  (:

Stephen