Triathlons - beginner's questions

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Armann Ingolfss » Wed, 11 Jul 1990 21:41:37


First of all, is it appropriate to discuss triathlons in this newsgroup ?

I am interested in participating in triathlons in the future.  I've been
running fairly regularly for about five years and 8 minute miles is a
comfortable pace for me.  I recently started bicycling, that is to say
bicycling more than a couple of miles at a time.  I've never been much of
a swimmer, but I can slug it out on ***stroke for quite a while.
So, here are my questions for you experienced triathletes ("try - athletes ?")
out there:

1.  Logistics:  Does a non-serious triathlete need any kind of support staff
    (to take care of bike, shoes, etc.) ?

2.  Training:  Any thoughts on the minimum amount of training for someone
    who just wants to finish comfortably in (750 m swim, 20 km bike, 5 km
    run) or (1500 m swim, 40 km bike, 10 km run) races ?

3.  What are your favorite triathlons (preferably in the above distance
    ranges or thereabouts ?

Armann Ingolfsson
Operations Research Center
MIT

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Larry Chapman X31 » Thu, 12 Jul 1990 22:59:08

Quote:

> First of all, is it appropriate to discuss triathlons in this newsgroup ?

Sure.

Quote:

> 1.  Logistics:  Does a non-serious triathlete need any kind of support staff
>     (to take care of bike, shoes, etc.) ?

Most races do not allow any support during the race.  It does help to have a
buddy there to help carry stuff before and after though . . .

Quote:

> 2.  Training:  Any thoughts on the minimum amount of training for someone
>     who just wants to finish comfortably in (750 m swim, 20 km bike, 5 km
>     run) or (1500 m swim, 40 km bike, 10 km run) races ?

A good rule-of-thumb is to try and train 3x the target race mileage per week.
Now don't go and try this all the first week.  You'll need to build up slowly.
There are several good books on the subject you can find at your local
book store by the "big name" athletes.

-- lSc

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Keith Jacks » Sat, 14 Jul 1990 22:59:10


Quote:
Ingolfsson) writes:
>First of all, is it appropriate to discuss triathlons in this newsgroup ?

  I hope so until rec.triathlon is available.

Quote:

>1.  Logistics:  Does a non-serious triathlete need any kind of support staff
>    (to take care of bike, shoes, etc.) ?

  Support during a triathlon is a big no no, even having someone hand you a
  cup of water other than a 'race official' is against the rules.  Having help
  set up before the race is OK, but its not necessary. I beginner can easily
  handle it.  My advice would be to watch a triathlon first to see how others
  handle the logistics.

Quote:

>2.  Training:  Any thoughts on the minimum amount of training for someone
>    who just wants to finish comfortably in (750 m swim, 20 km bike, 5 km
>    run) or (1500 m swim, 40 km bike, 10 km run) races ?

  I think if you follow the rule of 3's you should do well.  The rule of 3's is
  to train 3 times the distance of each event for the week.  In other words for a
  1.5,40,10K triathlon you should swim 4.5K, bike 120K, and run 30K per week.
  Try and divide this into 9 workouts per week with one rest day.

Quote:

>3.  What are your favorite triathlons (preferably in the above distance
>    ranges or thereabouts ?

  I've never raced in your area before so I don't have an opinion.
--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Keith Jackson                  |     phone: 216-433-5105

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by terry.l.welsh » Wed, 18 Jul 1990 01:40:09


        [ questions about triathlons ]

I have a question for experienced tri- and bi-athlon people.
Is there any way to minimize the "*** leg" syndrome that at
least I experience in the transition from bike to run?

Terry Welsher
att!mhuxo!tlw

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Ray Bradbu » Wed, 18 Jul 1990 07:12:37

Quote:

>I have a question for experienced tri- and bi-athlon people.
>Is there any way to minimize the "*** leg" syndrome that at
>least I experience in the transition from bike to run?

The best way I have found is to do 'bricks': Go for a HARD ride
approximately the distance you are aiming for and then get
straight off and do a moderate/hard run. Painful at first, but
worth it in the long run!

Ray

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Mark Seama » Thu, 19 Jul 1990 00:04:07

I too have experienced the "*** leg" syndrome that you describe.  After
participating in the San Diego International Tri earlier this year, I was
discussing the issue with another participant during the bus ride back to
the transition area.  He told me that whenever he finishes a bike ride
during training, he IMMEDIATELY puts on his running shoes and runs 1-2
miles HARD.  He is, in a sense, training his body to better manage the
transition.  I've been using this technique for the past month and have
noticed an improvement in my ability to make the transition from bike
to run.  Any comments?

Mark Seamans                                     "Are there any triathletes
NCR Systems Engineering San Diego                 out there???"
[This space reserved for an original discliamer]

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Keith Jacks » Thu, 19 Jul 1990 00:23:28

Quote:


>    [ questions about triathlons ]

>I have a question for experienced tri- and bi-athlon people.
>Is there any way to minimize the "*** leg" syndrome that at
>least I experience in the transition from bike to run?

>Terry Welsher
>att!mhuxo!tlw

Try shorting your stride down for the first 3/4 of a mile or until you
feel your legs coming back.  Almost every race I do I get off the bike
and think 'this time I really fried my legs, I'm done' then around the
3/4 to 1 mile mark, the legs come back and I'm ready to go.

It helps to practice getting off the bike after a hard workout and run-
ning a few miles.  Do this at least one every other week.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Keith Jackson                  |     phone: 216-433-5105

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Tim Sulliv » Wed, 18 Jul 1990 22:08:01

Quote:

>I have a question for experienced tri- and bi-athlon people.
>Is there any way to minimize the "*** leg" syndrome that at
>least I experience in the transition from bike to run?

>Terry Welsher
>att!mhuxo!tlw

The July issue of Triathlon Today covers the topic of running after the bike
briefly.  In short, it mentions that Frank Shorter considers it as much a
mental challenge as a physical one in the sence that the athlete must realize
that the feeling is temporary, and that your leg speed will return.  Shorter
says that that confidence comes from doing speed work, and suggests doing
weekly interval workouts.

This approach probably works, but I have been slow to incorporate interval
training in the four seasons I have done triathlons.  I do, however, in the
weeks preceding a triathlon (or biathlon), begin to do bike/run workouts
about once a week.  You never quite get rid of the *** leg feeling, but the
experience of getting the legs loosened up, and knowing that it is a temporary
condition is comforting (relatively).

The last thing I can suggest that might help is that in the last mile, or two,
of the bike course, begin flexing your ankels in an exaggerated motion, as well
as spinning a little faster in a lower gear.  This helps to get the leg musles
used in running loosened up, and ready to run.  You may also want to spend
15 seconds in the transition area streching your calfs and thighs.  It may save
you time on the run course, or at the least, save you 15 seconds on the run,
but you feel more comfortable doing it even though you only break even.

Lots of luck, and keep at it.

Tim

Tim Sullivan                                    rochester!cci632!ccird5!tims

                                                uunet!rlgvax!cci632!ccird5!tims

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Steve Fritzinger - SE Sun Washingt » Thu, 19 Jul 1990 01:33:44

Quote:

>I have a question for experienced tri- and bi-athlon people.
>Is there any way to minimize the "*** leg" syndrome that at
>least I experience in the transition from bike to run?

The stronger you are on the bike, the easier it is to make that transition.
Last season I did a lot of hill training and sprint workouts on the bike,
and really helps when starting the run.  Also at least once a week get
in a ride and run work-out.  I'll usually ride about 3/4 of my planned
race distance, immedatly followed by a run of about 3/4 the run distance.
It's a very hard workout, and I have to go light the next day, so I only
do that once or twice a week.

The basic plan is be strong on the bike so your legs aren't completely
wasted going into the run, and pratice the transition so you know how to
handle it.

NOTE: followups are sent to rec.bicycles

--
Steve Fritzinger Sun Microsystems Vienna VA.

"He won't get far on hot air and fantasy"

 
 
 

Triathlons - beginner's questions

Post by Larry Chapman X31 » Wed, 18 Jul 1990 22:25:42

Quote:
> I have a question for experienced tri- and bi-athlon people.
> Is there any way to minimize the "*** leg" syndrome that at
> least I experience in the transition from bike to run?

Here are my "hints":

  1) Practice it during training by doing a short run after most
     bike rides.  Just run until your "*** legs" go away.  Yes,
     you can train for this!

  2) During the last bit (you can decide how long a "bit" is) of the cycling
     portion spin a bit more than usual and get out of the saddle (which uses
     more "running muscles").

  3) Take the first part of the run *easy* if you sprint out of the transition
     area you may never loosen up.  A bit of restraint in the first 1/2 mile
     should allow you to stride out and fly later on.

  4) Be strong!  I've found that weight training for my legs and/or running steep
     hills has almost eliminated this problem for me.

-- LSC