Choosing the right trial shoe

Choosing the right trial shoe

Post by Emilygo.. » Thu, 30 Aug 2007 07:42:52


The selection process for buying trail-running shoes varies
tremendously from person to person and is often haphazard. Finding the
right "fit" is a key, but elusive, objective for both newcomers and
trail-saavy runners; finding one that endures over the long haul is
another.
Despite best intentions to shop around and learn from past purchasing
mistakes, it is always surprising how many answers you get when you
ask trail runners how they came to purchase the particular shoes they
are wearing. They might as well say it was a blind date or an arranged
marriage...

"I bought them from http://www.shoedeals4u.com/searchresults.asp"

 
 
 

Choosing the right trial shoe

Post by Doug Frees » Thu, 30 Aug 2007 20:25:30


Quote:
> The selection process for buying trail-running shoes varies
> tremendously from person to person and is often haphazard. Finding the
> right "fit" is a key, but elusive, objective for both newcomers and
> trail-saavy runners; finding one that endures over the long haul is
> another.
> Despite best intentions to shop around and learn from past purchasing
> mistakes, it is always surprising how many answers you get when you
> ask trail runners how they came to purchase the particular shoes they
> are wearing. They might as well say it was a blind date or an arranged
> marriage...

The difficulty is not limited to trail-running shoes but all running
shoes. What makes a trail shoe more difficult is there is no definition
of trail other than it's not paved. I don't consider paved paths that
wander through the woods a trail. ;) Even experienced trail geeks have
multiple pairs of 'trail' shoes to cope with the variety of conditions,
especially if they travel to out-of-state races.  When trail shoes first
came out all they did was take a road shoe and sell it in dark colors to
hide the dirt. Some of the stuff they sell as trail shoes still do that
but to a much lesser degree. It appears that trail shoes are a lucrative
market and there are many, choices with new brands cropping almost
weekly.

To make this decision more fun, some of us wear alleged road shoes on
trails. When conditions get difficult such as mud, I add screws for
traction and stay in my  favorite shoe.

If anyone wants to move from roads to trails, try your road shoes first
and see if they pass muster. If they don't work then you have a long
haul to find a working shoe for your conditions.

-Doug

 
 
 

Choosing the right trial shoe

Post by AIricKne.. » Fri, 31 Aug 2007 09:19:22


Quote:


> > The selection process for buying trail-running shoes varies
> > tremendously from person to person and is often haphazard. Finding the
> > right "fit" is a key, but elusive, objective for both newcomers and
> > trail-saavy runners; finding one that endures over the long haul is
> > another.
> > Despite best intentions to shop around and learn from past purchasing
> > mistakes, it is always surprising how many answers you get when you
> > ask trail runners how they came to purchase the particular shoes they
> > are wearing. They might as well say it was a blind date or an arranged
> > marriage...

> The difficulty is not limited to trail-running shoes but all running
> shoes. What makes a trail shoe more difficult is there is no definition
> of trail other than it's not paved. I don't consider paved paths that
> wander through the woods a trail. ;) Even experienced trail geeks have
> multiple pairs of 'trail' shoes to cope with the variety of conditions,
> especially if they travel to out-of-state races.  When trail shoes first
> came out all they did was take a road shoe and sell it in dark colors to
> hide the dirt. Some of the stuff they sell as trail shoes still do that
> but to a much lesser degree. It appears that trail shoes are a lucrative
> market and there are many, choices with new brands cropping almost
> weekly.

> To make this decision more fun, some of us wear alleged road shoes on
> trails. When conditions get difficult such as mud, I add screws for
> traction and stay in my  favorite shoe.

> If anyone wants to move from roads to trails, try your road shoes first
> and see if they pass muster. If they don't work then you have a long
> haul to find a working shoe for your conditions.

> -Doug

Douglass, you stupid homo. You just responded to ba spammer. Dumbass...

 
 
 

Choosing the right trial shoe

Post by TBRallamericanh.. » Fri, 31 Aug 2007 09:47:50


Quote:



>> > The selection process for buying trail-running shoes varies
>> > tremendously from person to person and is often haphazard. Finding
the
>> > right "fit" is a key, but elusive, objective for both newcomers and
>> > trail-saavy runners; finding one that endures over the long haul is
>> > another.
>> > Despite best intentions to shop around and learn from past
purchasing
>> > mistakes, it is always surprising how many answers you get when you
>> > ask trail runners how they came to purchase the particular shoes
they
>> > are wearing. They might as well say it was a blind date or an
arranged
>> > marriage...

>> The difficulty is not limited to trail-running shoes but all running
>> shoes. What makes a trail shoe more difficult is there is no
definition
>> of trail other than it's not paved. I don't consider paved paths that
>> wander through the woods a trail. ;) Even experienced trail geeks
have
>> multiple pairs of 'trail' shoes to cope with the variety of
conditions,
>> especially if they travel to out-of-state races.  When trail shoes
first
>> came out all they did was take a road shoe and sell it in dark colors
to
>> hide the dirt. Some of the stuff they sell as trail shoes still do
that
>> but to a much lesser degree. It appears that trail shoes are a
lucrative
>> market and there are many, choices with new brands cropping almost
>> weekly.

>> To make this decision more fun, some of us wear alleged road shoes on
>> trails. When conditions get difficult such as mud, I add screws for
>> traction and stay in my  favorite shoe.

>> If anyone wants to move from roads to trails, try your road shoes
first
>> and see if they pass muster. If they don't work then you have a long
>> haul to find a working shoe for your conditions.

>> -Doug

> Douglass, you stupid homo. You just responded to ba spammer.
>.Dumbass...

By the way, Doug, I've got the night off, so I'll be expressing my rage
all night long tonight.  Get used to it.  
 
 
 

Choosing the right trial shoe

Post by Al Bund » Sat, 01 Sep 2007 23:39:49


Quote:

> If anyone wants to move from roads to trails, try your road shoes first
> and see if they pass muster. If they don't work then you have a long
> haul to find a working shoe for your conditions.

> -Doug

The shoe spammer strikes again and you went for it like a channel cat.