AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

Post by Robert Anastasi » Wed, 15 Sep 1999 04:00:00


Now that it has been around for a few years, are there any studies that
show the advantage of Wharton's Active Isolated stretching over
stretching in which the stretch is held for 10 seconds or longer? The
Runners World article on AI stretching a few years back mentioned a
limited study.  Wharton's book has nothing but anecdotal evidence which
seems self serving to say to least.  Does anyone know how the scientific
community is coming out on this form of stretching?

--
Robert Anastasio

LI Running Home page: http://www.panix.com/~runner/lirun.htm

 
 
 

AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:00:00

The Wharton father and son team have done a great job of marketing what
they learned from Aaron Mattes  www.kudos.net/mattes.  It makes sense.  I
haven't seen any formal studies but I'm sure that some of the people around
here would know by doing some searches to their journals.  However, I've
seen it being utilized by Dean Brittenham at the Scripps Elite Athlete
Program here in San Diego, with some top world class athletes and numerous
others at all levels of competitive and non-competitive sport.

Ozzie


Quote:

> Now that it has been around for a few years, are there any studies that
> show the advantage of Wharton's Active Isolated stretching over
> stretching in which the stretch is held for 10 seconds or longer? The
> Runners World article on AI stretching a few years back mentioned a
> limited study.  Wharton's book has nothing but anecdotal evidence which
> seems self serving to say to least.  Does anyone know how the scientific
> community is coming out on this form of stretching?

> --
> Robert Anastasio

> LI Running Home page: http://www.panix.com/~runner/lirun.htm

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running:   http://www.mindfulness.com

 
 
 

AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

Post by freera » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:00:00

But is it effective?  Is it better to do 10 reps of a stretch holding for
only 2-3 seconds, or is it better to hold for more than 15 seconds
(conventional wisdom)?  Personally, I found the streching routines in the
Wharton book way too complicated and time consuming.  I would like to hear a
report from a weekend warrior who has used the Wharton techniques
successfully.


Quote:
> The Wharton father and son team have done a great job of marketing what
> they learned from Aaron Mattes  www.kudos.net/mattes.  It makes sense.  I
> haven't seen any formal studies but I'm sure that some of the people
around
> here would know by doing some searches to their journals.  However, I've
> seen it being utilized by Dean Brittenham at the Scripps Elite Athlete
> Program here in San Diego, with some top world class athletes and numerous
> others at all levels of competitive and non-competitive sport.

> Ozzie



> > Now that it has been around for a few years, are there any studies that
> > show the advantage of Wharton's Active Isolated stretching over
> > stretching in which the stretch is held for 10 seconds or longer? The
> > Runners World article on AI stretching a few years back mentioned a
> > limited study.  Wharton's book has nothing but anecdotal evidence which
> > seems self serving to say to least.  Does anyone know how the scientific
> > community is coming out on this form of stretching?

> > --
> > Robert Anastasio

> > LI Running Home page: http://www.panix.com/~runner/lirun.htm

> --
> In health and on the run,
> Ozzie Gontang
> Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
> Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

> Mindful Running:   http://www.mindfulness.com


 
 
 

AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Thu, 16 Sep 1999 04:00:00

The idea is that you use the agonist muscle and gently assist it for only 2
or 3 seconds so that the stretch reflex is not triggered.  With the people
that are weekend warriors their use of Aaron Mattes techniques used by the
Wharton's are very successful.

Aaron is one of those masters who receives the hopeless cases that the
orthopods and others have given up hope of helping.  I like what the
Wharton's give concerning the various levels of flexibility.

Like you I'd like to hear from others.  
Ozzie



Quote:
> But is it effective?  Is it better to do 10 reps of a stretch holding for
> only 2-3 seconds, or is it better to hold for more than 15 seconds
> (conventional wisdom)?  Personally, I found the streching routines in the
> Wharton book way too complicated and time consuming.  I would like to hear a
> report from a weekend warrior who has used the Wharton techniques
> successfully.



> > The Wharton father and son team have done a great job of marketing what
> > they learned from Aaron Mattes  www.kudos.net/mattes.  It makes sense.  I
> > haven't seen any formal studies but I'm sure that some of the people
> around
> > here would know by doing some searches to their journals.  However, I've
> > seen it being utilized by Dean Brittenham at the Scripps Elite Athlete
> > Program here in San Diego, with some top world class athletes and numerous
> > others at all levels of competitive and non-competitive sport.

> > Ozzie



> > > Now that it has been around for a few years, are there any studies that
> > > show the advantage of Wharton's Active Isolated stretching over
> > > stretching in which the stretch is held for 10 seconds or longer? The
> > > Runners World article on AI stretching a few years back mentioned a
> > > limited study.  Wharton's book has nothing but anecdotal evidence which
> > > seems self serving to say to least.  Does anyone know how the scientific
> > > community is coming out on this form of stretching?

> > > --
> > > Robert Anastasio

> > > LI Running Home page: http://www.panix.com/~runner/lirun.htm

> > --
> > In health and on the run,
> > Ozzie Gontang
> > Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
> > Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

> > Mindful Running:   http://www.mindfulness.com

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running:   http://www.mindfulness.com

 
 
 

AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

Post by Brian Bares » Thu, 23 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>But is it effective?  Is it better to do 10 reps of a stretch holding for
>only 2-3 seconds, or is it better to hold for more than 15 seconds
>(conventional wisdom)?  Personally, I found the streching routines in the
>Wharton book way too complicated and time consuming.  I would like to hear a
>report from a weekend warrior who has used the Wharton techniques
>successfully.

Here's one. I switched to AI stretching and have had almost no
soreness (DOMS) since, even when I increase my mileage faster than
recommended. (I've rarely been injured either, but that was true when
I was using static stretching too.)

An AI stretching routine also *feels* better than a static one, at
least to me, and I do notice a considerable increase in mobility when
I'm doing AI stretches regularly, compared with when I was doing
static stretches.

I also recommended AI stretches to my clients when I was actively
practicing sports massage, to good effect. My girlfriend says the
stretches are a considerable help for her low-back pain.

My opinion is that static stretching, judiciously applied, has
benefits; as does AI. My experience is that AI works better for me.
Like Ozzie, I haven't seen any formal studies. I'd sure like to.

Best regards,

Brian P. Baresch
Lawrence, Kansas, USA
Professional editing and proofreading

 
 
 

AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

Post by freera » Thu, 23 Sep 1999 04:00:00

How long does it take you to complete a set of the lower body exercises?


Quote:
> >But is it effective?  Is it better to do 10 reps of a stretch holding for
> >only 2-3 seconds, or is it better to hold for more than 15 seconds
> >(conventional wisdom)?  Personally, I found the streching routines in the
> >Wharton book way too complicated and time consuming.  I would like to
hear a
> >report from a weekend warrior who has used the Wharton techniques
> >successfully.

> Here's one. I switched to AI stretching and have had almost no
> soreness (DOMS) since, even when I increase my mileage faster than
> recommended. (I've rarely been injured either, but that was true when
> I was using static stretching too.)

> An AI stretching routine also *feels* better than a static one, at
> least to me, and I do notice a considerable increase in mobility when
> I'm doing AI stretches regularly, compared with when I was doing
> static stretches.

> I also recommended AI stretches to my clients when I was actively
> practicing sports massage, to good effect. My girlfriend says the
> stretches are a considerable help for her low-back pain.

> My opinion is that static stretching, judiciously applied, has
> benefits; as does AI. My experience is that AI works better for me.
> Like Ozzie, I haven't seen any formal studies. I'd sure like to.

> Best regards,

> Brian P. Baresch
> Lawrence, Kansas, USA
> Professional editing and proofreading

 
 
 

AI (Active Isolated) Stretching better than static stretching?

Post by Brian Bares » Wed, 29 Sep 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>How long does it take you to complete a set of the lower body exercises?

15-30 minutes depending on how thorough I want to be and whether I'm
in a hurry (shorter sets in that case).

Brian P. Baresch
Lawrence, Kansas, USA
Professional editing and proofreading