Allergies - Feel Worst 2 Hours After Run?

Allergies - Feel Worst 2 Hours After Run?

Post by Steve Freide » Tue, 07 Nov 2000 04:00:00


After a run this morning without an inhaler pretreatment (which felt as
OK as I could reasonably expect), I find my chest and throat feeling
constricted a few hours later.  I know I'm already in the middle of a
bad time because I raked leaves on Saturday then had to use my inhaler
after a bike ride on Sunday morning, suffering both the leftovers from
the day before and whatever was out there during my ride.

Is it normal/common to have an allergic reaction like this a couple of
hours after a run as opposed to during it?  One theory I'm entertaining
is that it takes a hour or two or three for the full force of the
allergans to "hit", and what matters is that I was out running in them.
If I had taken a 3-hour run, then I probably would have felt it at the
end of the run but not two hours post-run.

Thanks in advance.

Steve "wheez" Freides

 
 
 

Allergies - Feel Worst 2 Hours After Run?

Post by Zachary S. Hends » Tue, 07 Nov 2000 04:00:00



|> After a run this morning without an inhaler pretreatment (which felt as
|> OK as I could reasonably expect), I find my chest and throat feeling
|> constricted a few hours later.  I know I'm already in the middle of a
|> bad time because I raked leaves on Saturday then had to use my inhaler
|> after a bike ride on Sunday morning, suffering both the leftovers from
|> the day before and whatever was out there during my ride.
|>
|> Is it normal/common to have an allergic reaction like this a couple of
|> hours after a run as opposed to during it?  One theory I'm entertaining
|> is that it takes a hour or two or three for the full force of the
|> allergans to "hit", and what matters is that I was out running in them.
|> If I had taken a 3-hour run, then I probably would have felt it at the
|> end of the run but not two hours post-run.

From my childhood asthma, there was definitely a time lag between
the introduction of the allergen and the asthma attack.  Usually on the
scale of 2-12 hours, but a large number of my allergies were to food, so
that may change the timing somewhat.  But there was still a lag for raking
leaves, being around pets, etc as well.  In fact, that was part of the
challenge to try to figure out just what it was you did to trigger the
attack.  (They have scratch tests to figure out what you're allergic
to, but then they want to give you shots.  Every Week!  <shudder>)

It seems strange that exercise induced asthma would be delayed, however.
Other allergens seem to be additive, though, (i.e. being around a cat
might not set me off, but then eating chocolate afterward would be more
likely to), so maybe exercise is just another additive factor.

Zak

 
 
 

Allergies - Feel Worst 2 Hours After Run?

Post by marty.. » Tue, 07 Nov 2000 04:00:00

well, I have heard that running/exercise releases endorphins, some of
which work as bronchial dilators, so you may open up at the beginning
of the run, then close up to your normal level + whatever irritants you
ran into at the end...allergies suck



Quote:


> |> After a run this morning without an inhaler pretreatment (which
felt as
> |> OK as I could reasonably expect), I find my chest and throat
feeling
> |> constricted a few hours later.  I know I'm already in the middle
of a
> |> bad time because I raked leaves on Saturday then had to use my
inhaler
> |> after a bike ride on Sunday morning, suffering both the leftovers
from
> |> the day before and whatever was out there during my ride.
> |>
> |> Is it normal/common to have an allergic reaction like this a
couple of
> |> hours after a run as opposed to during it?  One theory I'm
entertaining
> |> is that it takes a hour or two or three for the full force of the
> |> allergans to "hit", and what matters is that I was out running in
them.
> |> If I had taken a 3-hour run, then I probably would have felt it at
the
> |> end of the run but not two hours post-run.

> From my childhood asthma, there was definitely a time lag between
> the introduction of the allergen and the asthma attack.  Usually on
the
> scale of 2-12 hours, but a large number of my allergies were to food,
so
> that may change the timing somewhat.  But there was still a lag for
raking
> leaves, being around pets, etc as well.  In fact, that was part of
the
> challenge to try to figure out just what it was you did to trigger
the
> attack.  (They have scratch tests to figure out what you're allergic
> to, but then they want to give you shots.  Every Week!  <shudder>)

> It seems strange that exercise induced asthma would be delayed,
however.
> Other allergens seem to be additive, though, (i.e. being around a cat
> might not set me off, but then eating chocolate afterward would be
more
> likely to), so maybe exercise is just another additive factor.

> Zak

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