Watches are the devil!

Watches are the devil!

Post by Big » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 07:37:25


Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
concerned with their times and splits?

BiG K

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Russ Boegehol » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 08:07:46

Yes.  Without the constraint or conditions of time, I can just lace up
my shoes and enjoy the run without being concerned with the
technicalities.  I also recently removed the odometer from my bike.
Sometimes riding without being concerned with average time per mile,
average miles per hour..etc  is a nice escape.  It helps me focus on the
real reasons I run and ride - because I enjoy it.  It's not always
necessary to pepper our activities with technology.  Just go out and
run.  Or ride.  Or (fill in the blank).
Quote:

> Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
> concerned with their times and splits?

> BiG K


 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by x411 » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 08:42:48

Quote:

>Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
>concerned with their times and splits?

>BiG K

well, as a beginning runner I can only say this: I run one direction
for a certain amount of time so it's important to turn around at the
right moment so my training time does not exceed. (and I actually
manage to get home without unneeded risk of injury)

same with the HRM: I'm learning to associate the % of MHR with the way
I feel.  After only 6 15 min runs I can tell just about how high the
HR is.

Not the first day.  I was all the way up the 180's (MHR now 190, but
will rise a bit after training) only half way the run, but had no
idea.  Good thing I had the HRM so I knew I needed to slow down.

I think this is important.  I assume once you're a seasoned athlete
and you know how to interpret your bodies signals a HRM or timer does
more bad than good.

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Charle » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 09:18:02

Yes, especially on long slow runs.  I can go as slow as i want.  No limits.
Quote:

> Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
> concerned with their times and splits?

> BiG K

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by SwStudi » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 09:39:38

The watch doesn't hinder me, rather it motivates me.
The question you ask depends entirely on one's reason to run.

--

David (in Hamilton, Ont)
http://www.angelfire.com/nc/swstudio/racing.html

-

Quote:
> Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
> concerned with their times and splits?

> BiG K

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Jeff » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 11:29:07

Runs are easier and more relaxing but also slower - depending on your goals
that might or might not be a good thing.

Even when I'm just running for time I go much faster when I am wearing a
watch for some reason.  I guess I usually have some idea of how long it
should take me to get from one place to another and these estimates usually
tend to be faster than they probably should be.  When I think I'm not going
to make it in the time I wanted to I speed up.

-jeff


Quote:
> Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
> concerned with their times and splits?

> BiG K

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Povl H. Peders » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 14:54:34

On Tue, 17 Apr 2001 18:37:25 -0400,

Quote:

>Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
>concerned with their times and splits?

Not for me. I use it in a sensible way to re-confirm how I feel.
I am not trying to run faster very often. I did yesterday, and PR'ed the
4.7 km roundtrip with around 40 secs.

Using the splits compared to how you feel can tell you about
your efficiency, how your health is etc. A HRM also helps this
information.

Just tell yourself to run x+ seconds slower than your PR.
A watch is not only there to increase speed.

--

Position: N 56 09 37 - E 010 12 29

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Rene van Belz » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 15:44:26

Quote:

>Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
>concerned with their times and splits?

And I always thought runners were concerned about results ;-)

If you want to progress, you'll need some objective manner to measure
you progression. A more constant pace can be a progression as well (at
least a basis for a more predictable result). For this you'll need a
watch, and you'll need to know the distance between your splits.

If you aren't interested in faster times, maybe you'd rather take up
hiking. Hiking is purely recreational; it doesn't matter how fast you
walk, as long as you reach your destination, and enjoy the scenary
while hiking. Also hiking is an excellent way to recover from a long
run, both physically and mentally.

Runners don't enjoy the scenary while running much; they're too busy
running. Keeping a constant pace takes a lot of your concentration,
otherwise used to study your environment.

And oh, if you writing this because on long runs keeping time gets
frustrating (or boring), then run less long runs, and run more short
runs instead. It's just a thought...

Rene van Belzen
hurray [at] xs4all [dot] nl

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Laur » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 18:46:29

Quote:
>The question you ask depends entirely on one's reason to run.

or more your attitude towards it....

there are a lot of very non-competitive runners who like to time everything..
and have measures for everything

likewise, there are a lot of very competitive runners (without mentioning any
female K*&yans! and the like) who tend to do a lot of their training unaffacted
by the restraints of time

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Daniel Pierre-Antoin » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 21:29:19

Quote:


> >Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
> >concerned with their times and splits?

> And I always thought runners were concerned about results ;-)

> If you want to progress, you'll need some objective manner to measure
> you progression.

You are right, but every run doesn't have to be a test. If you race and
do intervals, how you feel during your one interval workout week after
week tells you something. If you do the same thing (same distnaces, same
pace, same rest) every once in a while and you feel less and less tired,
it tells you something. There's no need to time every run of the week.

Quote:
> A more constant pace can be a progression as well

Now, that is a good point. Why not take pace samples of 1K or 1mi along
the long run course? That's what I do. I do use my watch/HRM but I don't
focus on it all the time. There are 2 points at which I check my time,
and they don't correspond to a specific distance. The first is a bridge,
which I normally reach in 10:00 to 10:40; the 2nd, is when I reach the
dirt trail I run on after 23:00 - 24:30; then, I pretty much go as I
feel. Late in the run (90min) I check my pace over one K to confirm.

(at

Quote:
> least a basis for a more predictable result). For this you'll need a
> watch, and you'll need to know the distance between your splits.

> If you aren't interested in faster times, maybe you'd rather take up
> hiking. Hiking is purely recreational; it doesn't matter how fast you
> walk, as long as you reach your destination, and enjoy the scenary
> while hiking. Also hiking is an excellent way to recover from a long
> run, both physically and mentally.

> Runners don't enjoy the scenary while running much; they're too busy
> running. Keeping a constant pace takes a lot of your concentration,
> otherwise used to study your environment.

> And oh, if you writing this because on long runs keeping time gets
> frustrating (or boring), then run less long runs, and run more short
> runs instead. It's just a thought...

> Rene van Belzen
> hurray [at] xs4all [dot] nl

--
===========================
Daniel Pierre-Antoine  
Dept. of Political Science
Carleton University
1125 Colonel By Drive
Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6

===========================
 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Dirk » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 01:09:42

Quote:
Big K wrote...
> Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
> concerned with their times and splits?

I.
Don't know about hitting the "sooo" level, but I almost always do better
when I'm not clock-watching, that's for sure. So much so that I might just
put my fingers in my ears and sing really loudly when I pass the mile
markers at my next 5K.

2.
I recently replaced my 8-lap Timex with a 100-lap memory model, and I'm glad
to have all the data at my fingertips, when I review how I've done
afterward. And in an odd way, I like the new watch's SMALLER split-time
display. Means I'm far less likely to pay attention to it during a run.

Makes for some tricky recovery jogs at the track, though.

C.
There have been times when I've forgotten my watch, and even though I could
turn around and retrieve it without thoroughly screwing up my workout, I've
decided to run without it. A little disorienting, although it *was* kind of
cool to be able to say I'd done it, afterwards.

A bit like playing golf without keeping score. Keeps the "good walk" from
being "spoiled."

--
Dirk

http://home.att.net/~da_bender/home.htm

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by joac.. » Thu, 19 Apr 2001 18:12:32

Hi,
Here's my 0.02 euros:

:>Anyone else think they run sooo much better when they are not constantly
:>concerned with their times and splits?

Not at all. I only use a stopwatch to monitor my progression. If
everything is all right, but I am running somewhat slowly, that's ok.
I'll keep on running slowly. If I set a new PR. Kudos to me and glad I
could measure it objectively. ;-)

: And I always thought runners were concerned about results ;-)

Even without using watches there are some good results. Both physically
and psychologically.

: Runners don't enjoy the scenary while running much; they're too busy
: running. Keeping a constant pace takes a lot of your concentration,
: otherwise used to study your environment.

Not agreed. Last week I went running at my in-laws. They live near the
river Maas. I had a 11 km run and I loved every second of it. One of the
reasons was the scenery.

Greetings,
der Joachim
--
Computational linguistics student at Tilburg U., the Netherlands
http://www.der-joachim.myweb.nl/

Servant of reality my hairy ass! (H.P. Derleth, Hollow One)

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Thotful5 » Sat, 21 Apr 2001 09:24:23

Quote:

> Good thing I had the HRM so I knew I needed to slow down.

>I think this is important.  I assume once you're a seasoned athlete
>and you know how to interpret your bodies signals a HRM or timer does
>more bad than good.

I wouldn't call myself "seasoned" though I have been running for 2 years.
 I still have problems knowing when I have gone out too fast, too soon...and
have occasionally crashed and burnt with a mile (or a few) to go.
 I depend on my heart rate...but use no gadgetry. Isn't that what arteries and
fingertips are for?
Teresa <so I'm thrifty, call me cheapskate>
 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by x411 » Sat, 21 Apr 2001 10:16:41


Quote:

>> Good thing I had the HRM so I knew I needed to slow down.

>>I think this is important.  I assume once you're a seasoned athlete
>>and you know how to interpret your bodies signals a HRM or timer does
>>more bad than good.

>I wouldn't call myself "seasoned" though I have been running for 2 years.
> I still have problems knowing when I have gone out too fast, too soon...and
>have occasionally crashed and burnt with a mile (or a few) to go.
> I depend on my heart rate...but use no gadgetry. Isn't that what arteries and
>fingertips are for?

and what kind of sensation do those fingertips emit when you come to a
stop one mile before the line?

... just kidding :-)))

Quote:
>Teresa <so I'm thrifty, call me cheapskate>

hehe - lol

I bought a fine HRM which is only $67. Has AHR and alarms.
Replaceable battery in the belt.

http://www.oregonscientific.com/pm800.html

that nice blue "EL HiGlo Backlight" has saved me on several occasions
from plunging in the river when I run on the dike in the middle of
night. :-)

 
 
 

Watches are the devil!

Post by Thotful5 » Sat, 21 Apr 2001 12:12:07

Quote:
>and what kind of sensation do those fingertips emit when you come to a
>stop one mile before the line?

Oh, I haven't stopped (yet) but I have hobbled along, laboring and in PAIN.

Quote:
>I bought a fine HRM which is only $67. Has AHR and alarms.
>Replaceable battery in the belt.

Alarms? Egads, what for??
So they can locate the body along the roadway? Whoops, no, I suppose that would
be a *beacon* right?
 Or a mini-black box!
And an extra battery? Hey...now That I could use. ;-)
Teresa