Don't run before giving blood!

Don't run before giving blood!

Post by Andrew Fo » Fri, 03 Sep 1993 06:11:51


Has anyone else been told you have abnormal levels
of ALT (alanine aminotransferase, a liver enzyme)
after running?  I am an on-again off-again runner,
and also used to be a semi-regular *** donor.

I received a letter from the American Red Cross after
a recent *** donation (nearing a gallon and a half
mark).  It said that the ALT level
in my *** was mildly elevated for the second time.
This *** cannot be used, and I will no longer be
accepted as a *** donor (I'm effectively blacklisted
from ever donating *** again for transusion).

The letter stated, "Most people who have results such as
yours, however do _not_ have a serious liver problem.  In
fact, many people who jog before giving *** show elevated
levels of these enzymes in their ***."  Well, I double checked
my running log, and I ran for 40 minutes the evening before
giving *** at 10 am the next morning.  It was the first run
for me after laying off a few weeks, and I estimate my heart
rate at 160-170 during most of the run (age 27).  So it was
a fairly stressful run for me, and I'm not surprised that
some *** analytes were slightly out of whack.

It just bothers me that I won't be able to give *** again,
although I probably have the cleanest *** in the world otherwise.
If they had contacted me after the first time the ALT level
was elevated, I wouldn't have gone jogging before giving
***!  But I tend to get a heavy workout in before I give
***, since I know I won't be able to get in a really heavy
workout immediately after giving ***.  Anyone else out
there have this problem?

For everyone's future reference, the letter stated several
things which can elevate the ALT level in ***:  aspirin,
acetaminophen, some anti-arthritis medicines, some *** pressure
medications, birth-control pills, recent *** consumption,
strenuous exercise, being overweight, or quick weight loss.
BTW, my ALT levels were 74 and 71 IU/l, respectively.
Levels between 64 and 120 IU/l are considered a "mild elevation",
so my levels were barely over the threshold.


--
   /^\-------      73 de N5IMA/9,          Andrew Fong
  |___|____        Jammin' Jugglin' Justified by Faith, Drewster
 /     \          

 
 
 

Don't run before giving blood!

Post by le.. » Fri, 03 Sep 1993 22:12:17

Quote:

> Has anyone else been told you have abnormal levels
> of ALT (alanine aminotransferase, a liver enzyme)
> after running?  I am an on-again off-again runner,
> and also used to be a semi-regular *** donor.

> I received a letter from the American Red Cross after
> a recent *** donation (nearing a gallon and a half
> mark).  It said that the ALT level
> in my *** was mildly elevated for the second time.
> This *** cannot be used, and I will no longer be
> accepted as a *** donor (I'm effectively blacklisted
> from ever donating *** again for transusion).

> The letter stated, "Most people who have results such as
> yours, however do _not_ have a serious liver problem.  In
> fact, many people who jog before giving *** show elevated
> levels of these enzymes in their ***."  Well, I double checked
> my running log, and I ran for 40 minutes the evening before
> giving *** at 10 am the next morning.  It was the first run
> for me after laying off a few weeks, and I estimate my heart
> rate at 160-170 during most of the run (age 27).  So it was
> a fairly stressful run for me, and I'm not surprised that
> some *** analytes were slightly out of whack.

> It just bothers me that I won't be able to give *** again,
> although I probably have the cleanest *** in the world otherwise.
> If they had contacted me after the first time the ALT level
> was elevated, I wouldn't have gone jogging before giving
> ***!  But I tend to get a heavy workout in before I give
> ***, since I know I won't be able to get in a really heavy
> workout immediately after giving ***.  Anyone else out
> there have this problem?

> For everyone's future reference, the letter stated several
> things which can elevate the ALT level in ***:  aspirin,
> acetaminophen, some anti-arthritis medicines, some *** pressure
> medications, birth-control pills, recent *** consumption,
> strenuous exercise, being overweight, or quick weight loss.
> BTW, my ALT levels were 74 and 71 IU/l, respectively.
> Levels between 64 and 120 IU/l are considered a "mild elevation",
> so my levels were barely over the threshold.


> --
>    /^\-------      73 de N5IMA/9,          Andrew Fong
>   |___|____        Jammin' Jugglin' Justified by Faith, Drewster
>  /     \          


I was participating in a clinic study as a healty volunteer several years ago.
I had such a naivete about physiological changes such as liver enzyme elevation
that when I put in a very heavy workout one evening, the clinicians found very
high enzyme levels the next day.  They were extremely concerned for my well
being until they found out what I had done, even though they knew I was a
runner.  I was severely criticized for continuing my running while on the
study.  

Thanks for the warning about hard workouts before donating ***.  I'm a regular
donor but have never had your experience.

Bob Leeds
Parke-Davis Running Club

 
 
 

Don't run before giving blood!

Post by Bill Innan » Thu, 09 Sep 1993 02:33:00


Quote:

> The last time I gave *** I ran about 9miles early morning before giving ***.This was sometime in July. I haven't really heard anything from NJ/Philadelphia
> Red Cross yet, so I presume there was nothing wrong. My *** did have high sugar, if I remember correctly.
> Ramkumar

I just got a #2 level bawling out by the Red Cross for running just before
I gave ***.  It was the first time I'd ever given in the evening, so I
can justifiably plead ignorance.  I only had enough time for a little 3 mi
run, but I completed it only 30-45 minutes before donating.

My BP was still high, as was my heart rate.  But what the nurse seemed to
be most upset about was the fact that running just before donating can
***up the *** chemistry in a way that they don't test for.  She seemed
to be most upset about the liver for some reason.  

They took my *** anyway, as they happened to need A+ badly just then.

Live and learn.  I'll now set a "no running" window 18 hr before, and 24 hr
after a donation.

If I didn't consider frequent, regular *** donations more important than
running this would turn me off.  But I've seen what a unit of *** can do
for someone who needs it (and not just accident victims and surgery
patients).  There *are* some things in life more important than running.
[Please note the *lack* of a smiley]

Bill
--

#include <stdDisclaimers.h>   /* Unless otherwise noted */

 
 
 

Don't run before giving blood!

Post by R.K. Kashy » Wed, 08 Sep 1993 23:55:34

The last time I gave *** I ran about 9miles early morning before giving ***.This was sometime in July. I haven't really heard anything from NJ/Philadelphia
Red Cross yet, so I presume there was nothing wrong. My *** did have high sugar, if I remember correctly.
Ramkumar
--


Standard disclaimers apply            |If the probability of success is not                                          | almost one, it is damn near zero.
                                      |                    -- David Ellis

 
 
 

Don't run before giving blood!

Post by Stan Jensen - SGI Expre » Fri, 10 Sep 1993 23:30:16

|> Has anyone else been told you have abnormal levels
|> of ALT (alanine aminotransferase, a liver enzyme)
|> after running?  I am an on-again off-again runner,
|> and also used to be a semi-regular *** donor.
|>
|> I received a letter from the American Red Cross after
|> a recent *** donation (nearing a gallon and a half
|> mark).  It said that the ALT level
|> in my *** was mildly elevated for the second time.
|> This *** cannot be used, and I will no longer be
|> accepted as a *** donor (I'm effectively blacklisted
|> from ever donating *** again for transusion).
|>
|> The letter stated, "Most people who have results such as
|> yours, however do _not_ have a serious liver problem.  In
|> fact, many people who jog before giving *** show elevated
|> levels of these enzymes in their ***."  Well, I double checked
|> my running log, and I ran for 40 minutes the evening before
|> giving *** at 10 am the next morning.  It was the first run
|> for me after laying off a few weeks, and I estimate my heart
|> rate at 160-170 during most of the run (age 27).  So it was
|> a fairly stressful run for me, and I'm not surprised that
|> some *** analytes were slightly out of whack.
|>
|> It just bothers me that I won't be able to give *** again,
|> although I probably have the cleanest *** in the world otherwise.
|> If they had contacted me after the first time the ALT level
|> was elevated, I wouldn't have gone jogging before giving
|> ***!  But I tend to get a heavy workout in before I give
|> ***, since I know I won't be able to get in a really heavy
|> workout immediately after giving ***.  Anyone else out
|> there have this problem?
|>
|> For everyone's future reference, the letter stated several
|> things which can elevate the ALT level in ***:  aspirin,
|> acetaminophen, some anti-arthritis medicines, some *** pressure
|> medications, birth-control pills, recent *** consumption,
|> strenuous exercise, being overweight, or quick weight loss.
|> BTW, my ALT levels were 74 and 71 IU/l, respectively.
|> Levels between 64 and 120 IU/l are considered a "mild elevation",
|> so my levels were barely over the threshold.

I checked with the Stanford *** Bank and they said that ALT levels
increase after "unusually strenuous exercise", such as running a 10K
when you haven't done any training. My ALT is typically 19-22, but a
week after my first 50-miler, it was measured at 33. They say elevated
ALT is a pre-cursor to hepatitis, so they're always checking it.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
 
 

Don't run before giving blood!

Post by Charles Eva » Wed, 22 Sep 1993 05:28:55


Quote:

>Has anyone else been told you have abnormal levels
>of ALT (alanine aminotransferase, a liver enzyme)
>after running?  I am an on-again off-again runner,
>and also used to be a semi-regular *** donor.

>I received a letter from the American Red Cross after
>a recent *** donation (nearing a gallon and a half
>mark).  It said that the ALT level
>in my *** was mildly elevated for the second time.
>This *** cannot be used, and I will no longer be
>accepted as a *** donor (I'm effectively blacklisted
>from ever donating *** again for transusion).

I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE!
I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE!

Here is my story.. about 2-3 years ago.. I dont know what
it was attributed to.. but I gave *** as i normally do
abotu once every two months.. it was my next-to gallon
pint.. at Mississippi State.. anyway.. igive as normal,
come a few weeks lateriget this horrible looking letter
from Mississippi S*** Services saiying bla bla bla
elevated ALT level blah bla you can never give *** again
crap.. whew it was a momentary relief.. HIV came into my
mind.. dunno how.. anyway, after thant i had a very complete
*** test..  the M. *** services said that my ALT
level was like (gosh been so long cant rememerb) was
like 200+ or 250.. weird.. some enzyme in the liver..
normal was said to ebtween something and 50.. whew..
i think 15-50.. i got a complete recheck.. it was at 26 or
ium 27.. i was so very pissed.. i have talked with ***
giving folks and stuff and they said.. even IF such things
NEVER elevated again out of range, i cant be cleared from
the list.. I attributed it to a month or so ago.. 2months
anyway i was like really sick.. never foudn out why.. lost
20 lbs in 2 weeks.. docs thought it was some liver-hepattus
thing.. trying to rememerb. thought that may have done it
but there wa a bit of time between the two.. yes i run run
run
6-7 miles (then) 4-5 times a week.. never heard that was
a reason.. boy im still pissed abotu it.. mom said, oh just
as well.. i was worried abotu you giving ***.. aids, etc..
just drop it.

Quote:
>It just bothers me that I won't be able to give *** again,
>although I probably have the cleanest *** in the world otherwise.

join the crowd.. afround htat time, i was as fit as i had
ever been in my life.. my bad-cholesterol was down to 113,
resting pulse under 50.. then i get slapped withthis.. oh
well

Quote:
>BTW, my ALT levels were 74 and 71 IU/l, respectively.
>Levels between 64 and 120 IU/l are considered a "mild elevation",
>so my levels were barely over the threshold.

i'll try to get my exact doctors crud on this..

Charles 'can't give ***' Evans
--


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Don't run before giving blood!

Post by Charles Eva » Wed, 22 Sep 1993 05:32:24


Quote:

>I checked with the Stanford *** Bank and they said that ALT levels
>increase after "unusually strenuous exercise", such as running a 10K
>when you haven't done any training. My ALT is typically 19-22, but a
>week after my first 50-miler, it was measured at 33. They say elevated
>ALT is a pre-cursor to hepatitis, so they're always checking it.

Thats what they said.. hep stuff.. the blue ***-sheet from my
test said shoudl be between 15 and 50.. i think now it was abotu
120-150.. weirdly high.. i think i had run that morning.. im quite
a big guy running.. dunno.. well i have my scarlet letter.

in my other post i said aroudn 200 was my alt level.. gotta get
the facts.. gonna find out

--


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