My Boston Marathon Race Report

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Teresa Plyma » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 04:22:10


Quote:

> Jennifer - yes, of course they were Sam Adams beer

Sam Adams! Oh, don't tell me they had the SA Porter there....

Thanks for the race report, I enjoyed reading it!

Teresa in AZ

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Mike Conw » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 05:33:33

Quote:
>From: "Chuck Gulker"
>Every seriously trained runner should try and race Boston.  The event is
>stunning in all respects.

This will be a common reply no doubt, but ditto on that.  Did Boston in '99 and
your race report brought back all those memories of that spectacular race.

Congratulations, great report and very well done on the time.

Mike C

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Chuck Gulke » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 06:24:54

I have no doubt David you will be at Boston next year.

Take care and thanks for the congrats.

Chuck

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by runl.. » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 09:10:31

Thank you for the race report, Chuck. It was inspiring to say the least. I read
this group alot and am training for my first marathon.(Grandma's in June).
Hearing first hand reports such as yours, does so much to motivate and inspire
first timers like me. I felt like I was there with you.

Congratulations
MaryKay

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Chuck Gulke » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 09:27:52

Good luck MaryKay with your first marathon.  You'll do great.

Take care, Chuck

Quote:

> Thank you for the race report, Chuck. It was inspiring to say the least. I
read
> this group alot and am training for my first marathon.(Grandma's in June).
> Hearing first hand reports such as yours, does so much to motivate and
inspire
> first timers like me. I felt like I was there with you.

> Congratulations
> MaryKay

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Dave/Cheryl Chandle » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 09:44:11

Chuck--congratulations.  What a great report and a great accomplishment for
you.  I struggled but overall, enjoyed the experience (hey, it's Boston).  But
I'm still trying to figure out why I didn't do better since my training went
well.  What aspects of your training do you feel (guess?) helped you to do so
well?

Again--great job

Dave

Quote:

> Here is my Boston Marathon Race Report:

> It was exactly one year ago that I watched the Boston Marathon on ESPN and
> said to my co-workers "I want to be in that race".  After a ton of training,
> racing, and strict attention to nutrition, I made the trip to Boston this
> year.  I qualified at the Oct 2000 Columbus Marathon running a 3:12 chip
> time (Mens 40-44 Division).

> Andy and I were scheduled to leave Columbus at Noon last Friday, however our
> flight got cancelled and we ended up departing at 4:30 PM.  Luckily I got a
> free $ 185.00 ticket good for one year anywhere on American Airlines.  We
> arrived in Boston at 6:30 PM under sunny, but windy skies.  Took the "T"
> subway to our hotel in Cambridge, checked into our hotel, and had dinner at
> a Mexican restaurant.  Turned in early.

> Met up with another friend who traveled from Baltimore (Mok).  Early
> Saturday morning Andy, Mok and I went on a nice 3.5 mile run along a running
> path next to the Charles River.  Watched a bunch of crew boats.  The weather
> was sunny, but brisk.  Around 11:15 AM another friend (Greg) arrived from
> Columbus and three of us headed to the Race Expo at the World Trade Center
> in downtown Boston.

> The Expo was really hopping when we arrived.  Picked up our race packet and
> I purchased a jacket, a hat, some socks, and a pair of running pants.  It
> was nice blowing some cash and helping the Boston economy.  Lucked out and
> got to see Bill Rogers.....winner of 4 Boston Marathons.  By pure chance, I
> ran into one of my long distance running partners who was traveling solo.
> Andy, Greg, and Mok didn't want to spend much time at the Expo, so they
> headed off while my friend and I continued to tool around the Expo
> purchasing more and more stuff.  Left the Expo and headed up town and
> grabbed some lunch.  The weather continued to be gorgeous....but still
> windy.

> Attended a Columbus based dinner at a fancy Italian restaurant later on
> Saturday night.  Took the subway home and hit the hay around midnight.

> Awoke Sunday morning with a terrible sore throat.  Friend Mok also picked up
> a sore throat as did several other runners we talked to in the hotel lobby.
> Something wasn't right with the filtration system.  Left my window open on
> Sunday night and Monday night, and things got better.  Whew!

> Did very little on Sunday other than rest and sit around the pool talking
> about the upcoming race.  On Sunday night, we got on the subway and attended
> the Boston Marathon Pasta party.  That was a lot of fun.  Excellent food.
> Had dinner with two woman traveling from Chicago.....one of them recently
> moving from Finland.  Another guy at our table had flown in from Germany.
> Got back to our hotel and called it a night around 9:30 PM.

> At 2:00 AM, the hotel fire alarm went off.  I had to walk down 15 flights of
> stairs.  It was a false alarm, and I never could fall back asleep.  What a
> way to spend the night before the biggest marathon in the world.  Oh well,
> what could I do.

> It's now race morning.  Took the subway to Boston Commons (a large downtown
> city park) and got on a school bus which took us to the start of the race in
> rural Hopkintown 26 miles to the west.  The trip took exactly one hour and
> we arrived at 'Athletes Village' a tad after 9:00 AM.  Thousands of runners
> were already there.  Unbelievably we ran into our 44 year old Finish woman
> friend Kielo (the one we met at the pasta party) and she joined our group
> waiting around for the start of the race.   It was pretty warm (45-52) and
> very sunny.  A bit breezy.

> Around 11:20 AM, I made a quick change from a long sleeve shirt to a Coolmax
> short sleeve shirt.  Glad I did.  The runners had to walk about 3/4 of a
> mile to the start of the race.  There were 15,000 runners making the walk!!!
> We left our drop bags at marked school buses parked along the way.  We would
> later get to pick up our stuff at the finish line.

> I arrived in my corral at 11:50 AM.  E***ment was everywhere.  Talked to
> other runners around me who all looked mighty fit indeed.  The national
> anthem was played while two F15's fighter jets flew over.  I expected to
> hear the starting gun, but no such luck.  All of a sudden, the runners
> started to creep forward.  The race was on!  It took me 2:38 to walk on and
> off to the actually starting line.  Once I passed the starting rug, I
> clicked my Timex Ironman watch and by some miracle I could actually start
> running normally at my regular stride.  Apparently this year, they only used
> 1/2 the road width for the starting corrals and this helped reduce the
> bottlenecks.  Luckily I started well towards the front of the pack, so I was
> running with pretty fast racers.

> My race strategy was to run even to negative splits and shoot for around a
> 3:15 time....the whole time staying out of trouble during the run.  In the
> three weeks prior to the race, I had slept very poorly so I felt mentally
> and often times physically fatigued.  My training had averaged 62.5 miles
> per week with numerous long runs between 20-26 miles.

> The first mile was very much downhill....much more than I would have ever
> imaged.  Many runners said to go out conservatively to avoid 'trashing your
> quads'.  Despite being able to run normally, I was now in SUPER HEAVY
> traffic the likes that I have never experienced before.  I stayed on the far
> outside doing the best I could to avoid wrecking into other runners.  My
> first two miles were perfect at 7:30 and 7:12.  We were now running through
> the rural countryside and I was feeling light and very much in excellent
> physical condition.  It had the makings of a fine day.

> Did the next 10 miles feeling like I was expending zero effort.  Traveled
> through a few cool towns with tons and tons of spectators cheering us on.
> Took on Gatorade every mile and took at GU pack at 35 minutes and later at
> 1:40 into the race.

> Around 12.5 miles I could begin hearing the screams and yells of the woman
> at Wellsley College.  When I arrived at the school, there was a 1/2 mile of
> gorgeous coeds awaiting us male runners.  They all wanted high 5's and many
> of them flashed signs saying 'Kiss Me'.  Next year, I plan to carry some
> breath mints and make out with at least a dozen of them.  My 1/2 Marathon
> split was a very decent 1:31:07 (Chip time).

> The crowds now were growing larger and larger.  I was still feeling
> great....not tired in the least.  Hit the Newton Hills at around 16 miles
> and literally flew up them.  I was passing runners right and left.  By now,
> most runners around me had numbers in the 3,000's.   I started with the
> 5,000's and had made up much, much time over the field.  My hard
> Winter/Spring training was really beginning to pay off.

> Hit the famous Heartbreak Hill (20.5 miles) and continued to run smoothly up
> the fairly long 1/2 mile hill.  I never got passed and instead must have
> passed 20-50 runners during this stretch.  My confidence was growing with
> each slide.

> Around 22-23 miles, it dawned on me that I had a very real chance of racing
> a sub 3:00 hour marathon.....and on the  tough hilly Boston course!!  I
> thought to myself "should I let it all hang out, or just continue to run at
> a decent pace insuring a quality and better than zombie-like finish?"  My
> answer was "go for it".

> Cranked along being very careful to not fall or slip on the numerous gel
> packs and water cups littering the course.  Was in a very, very focused
> state now.

> At around 24 miles, I noticed that the pack had thinned out noticeably.
> Everyone around me (and the fans for that matter) were talking about the
> possibility of doing a sub 3:00 hour marathon.....and obviously fine time at
> any age.  I pick up the famous Citgo sign around this time.  I know when I
> pass it, there is about 1 mile to go.

> Continued putting one foot in front of the other hoping the end would hurry
> up.  Stopped watching my watch and am now just running as hard as I can move
> my 44.5 year old body.  I'm now within about 3/4 of a mile and eventually
> come to the final left turn onto the finishing stretch.  The buildings are
> tall and the crowd simply enormous.  Shit, the finish line is just too far
> down the road.  .....unless I turn into sprinter Michael Johnson, I will not
> break 3:00 hours in this race.   I continue to pass some runners and make
> the decision to pass under the left side of the finishing line.  I raise my
> arms, look up at the camera, and my first Boston Marathon is history.  My
> chip time ends up being 3:01:05.

> I proceed to get my chip cut off and receive my finishing medal.  The sun is
> shinning brightly.  I have reached the end of my goal.  While disappointed I
> did not break 3:00 hours, I still felt proud of my time.....and better yet
> how good I felt during the race.  I was never spent and ran faster in the
> second part of the race (the second half is much tougher because of the
> hills).

> Spent some time in the recovery area munching out and talking to other
> finishers.

> Met up with my friends and took a subway back to our hotel.....arriving to
> the Raddison around 4:45 PM.  Took an ultra hot shower and ended up ordering
> pizza with my friends.  Watched a two hour marathon recap on TV while
> pigging out of the best pizza I've ever eaten.  Went back to my room around
> 9:15 PM, watched some more TV and then went into REM sleep around midnight.

> Got up Tuesday morning, had a nice breakfast in the hotel and then went on a
> nice 4.5

...

read more »

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Chuck Gulke » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 10:11:09

<<  What aspects of your training do you feel (guess?) helped you to do so
well?  >>

Thanks for the congrats Dave.  The following helped me for Boston:

62.5 miles per week average mileage

Proper taper

Attention to proper nutrition, hydration, and carbo loading

2 Ultra Marathons since December 30

Weekly long runs (19-26 miles)

Negative split at Boston

Desire and determination to run well at Boston

Woman at Mile 13

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Caryn Zei » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 01:52:52

: Around 12.5 miles I could begin hearing the screams and yells of the woman
: at Wellsley College.  When I arrived at the school, there was a 1/2 mile of
: gorgeous coeds awaiting us male runners.  They all wanted high 5's and many
: of them flashed signs saying 'Kiss Me'.  Next year, I plan to carry some
: breath mints and make out with at least a dozen of them.  My 1/2 Marathon
: split was a very decent 1:31:07 (Chip time).

There should have been some kind of "no liquids while reading" warning
before this paragraph...you make me laugh!

: Final Chip Time:  3:01:05
: Average Per Mile:  6:54
: Finish in the Mens 40-44 (264 out of 1,725 --- top 15%).

Great job Chuck!!! And thanks for the report.

Caryn

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Wilson, Cam [QUAL:X754:EXCH » Fri, 20 Apr 2001 21:12:14

Congratulations, Chuck! Great time.....
 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by David Forbe » Sat, 21 Apr 2001 03:30:33

Is that in order of importnace, Chuck?
BTW congrats on a great race.

Quote:

> <<  What aspects of your training do you feel (guess?) helped you to do so
> well?  >>

> Thanks for the congrats Dave.  The following helped me for Boston:

> 62.5 miles per week average mileage

> Proper taper

> Attention to proper nutrition, hydration, and carbo loading

> 2 Ultra Marathons since December 30

> Weekly long runs (19-26 miles)

> Negative split at Boston

> Desire and determination to run well at Boston

> Woman at Mile 13

--
Regards,
Dave
**************************************
I'd love to think that there's an end
just waiting right around the bend,
but every turn's a tunnel.
       I descend
I'm the running man...
Edward Ka Spell and kEvin Key,
The Last Man to Fly, 1991
**************************************
 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Ally Spei » Sat, 21 Apr 2001 06:14:17

Well done.  I went last year to watch my now hubby Steve Speirs,  run Boston in
3.04.  He was 1 of only 3 welshmen running in it ( from Cardiff Wales) and
finally he moved to USA this Jan and we got married.  It is an awesome race and
I am trying to qualify this year for 2002.  I have done 2 marathons but am
really a triahtlete so it might be hard to do but I will keep trying.

Again awesome race, well done

Ally
whose goals and aspirations lead her to stupidly train for too much stuff
entirely!!!

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by scott richardso » Tue, 24 Apr 2001 09:25:56

Chuck:  Excelent report!  What does "run even with negative splits" mean?
Thanks.
Scott in Austin MN
Quote:

> Here is my Boston Marathon Race Report:

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Doug Frees » Tue, 24 Apr 2001 10:00:49

Quote:

> Chuck:  Excelent report!  What does "run even with negative splits" mean?
> Thanks.

You run the second half of the race faster than the first. How
much slower varies from person to person. The object is to run
a little conservative at first and have a strong finish.  I have
always used this technique. Others try even splits(assuming the
course is symmetrical) and still others go balls to the wall
from the start and slowly die.

Choices.....pick your own.

--
Caveat Lector
Doug Freese

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Chuck Gulke » Thu, 26 Apr 2001 09:15:01

Doug, Boston was the first race I ever ran faster in the 2nd half of the
race.  More than likely, it's the reason I did so well.

Chuck Gulker
Columbus, Ohio

 
 
 

My Boston Marathon Race Report

Post by Doug Frees » Fri, 27 Apr 2001 20:06:38

Quote:

> Doug, Boston was the first race I ever ran faster in the 2nd half of the
> race.  More than likely, it's the reason I did so well.

Isn't is amazing what the ultra circuit can teach about
running smart. Actually the corollary is more appropriate,
run too fast and really learn what crash and burn means. :)

Good luck with Horton's race. It will help you define
hills.  I was thinking about it but I was concerned
about too much racing.  

--
Caveat Lector
Doug Freese