Knee problem, runners knee and the next step.

Knee problem, runners knee and the next step.

Post by Riddoch, Neil [HAL02:HQ13:EXCH » Wed, 05 Sep 2001 22:33:36


Hi,
        I am looking for a bit of advice, I have recently started to increase
my mileage (outdoors, mostly on road) and in the last month or so my
right knee has started to give me grief after running. Its a generally
feeling of stiffness, slight discomfort not localized in any particular
place but across the whole knee. It is particularly noticeable when
going down stairs. It doesn't give me any problems when running but a
couple of hours after/next day it seems to stiffen up. From what i've
read it seems to be "runners knee", I think I roll my right foot more
than the left but whether that is the root cause I am not sure.
I have read some of Ozzie's posts on this or similar, (Sept 1st on
rolling pins and facia release) and that is a long term cure/relief,
what I was wonder is what I should do now?

Stop running for a couple of weeks.
Cut down on my running.
Only run on soft surfaces or treadmills.
Wear a (neoprene) knee support.
Seek medical advice.
 or none of the above.

Any advice or help would be gratefully received.

Neil Riddoch

 
 
 

Knee problem, runners knee and the next step.

Post by George Beinhor » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 00:16:56

See a podiatrist. Prescription orthotics completely cured my knee problems.

--
George Beinhorn
"How to Run Your First 50-Miler"
http://www.oceansofenergy.com

 
 
 

Knee problem, runners knee and the next step.

Post by Ozzie Gonta » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 02:33:35


Quote:

> Hi,
>         I am looking for a bit of advice, I have recently started to increase
> my mileage (outdoors, mostly on road) and in the last month or so my
> right knee has started to give me grief after running. Its a generally
> feeling of stiffness, slight discomfort not localized in any particular
> place but across the whole knee. It is particularly noticeable when
> going down stairs. It doesn't give me any problems when running but a
> couple of hours after/next day it seems to stiffen up. From what i've
> read it seems to be "runners knee", I think I roll my right foot more
> than the left but whether that is the root cause I am not sure.
> I have read some of Ozzie's posts on this or similar, (Sept 1st on
> rolling pins and facia release) and that is a long term cure/relief,
> what I was wonder is what I should do now?

> Stop running for a couple of weeks.
> Cut down on my running.
> Only run on soft surfaces or treadmills.
> Wear a (neoprene) knee support.
> Seek medical advice.
>  or none of the above.

> Any advice or help would be gratefully received.

> Neil Riddoch

Neil,

The rolling of the quads or massaging them is extremely helpful in
loosening the quad muscle so that it can relax and release.  Once that
happens, the muscles relaxes and takes the pressure off the tendon which
then takes the pressure off the knee.   http://www.mindfulness.com/of5.asp

As I've mentioned in other posts,  during a training run, I may stop 6 to
10 times to keep loosening the quads or hamstrings.

Freeing the quads and working on the hamstring by using the edge of a chair
on them or sitting on a tennis ball or later a baseball as a way to
accupressure the hamstrings will do more for the release of tendons around
the knee.

Remember muscles relax and contract.  If they only partially relax, then
the tendon has to take up that tension.  Tendons can stretch but they're
not suppose to.  It's the muscles that relax and contract.  Loosen that
which is suppose to relax and unnecessary tension to the tendon disappears.

If you are hitting on the back of the heel of the shoe as you run, as in
heel striker, then you are giving your joints a beating.  We're back to
lifting the knees and marching in place to see what running is about.  If
you are lifting your center of gravity with each step more than is needed,
then you are coming back down to earth with a rather hard jar to the knees.
If you are landing on the back of the heel of the shoe, they your running
is a deceleration with each step because of the overstride.  Overstride
defined as your foot is landing in front of your center of gravity.

Don't know how much running you're doing so don't know if it's about
cutting down.  Practice lifting the knees as in marching in place and lean
from the ankle.  Land softly ball then heel.  As soon as the heel touches
that triggers the lifting of the other knee.  The transition means you
don't have to jump up and down with each step.

I'm for running on uneven ground so as to get the foot/ankle and leg able
to do what they're suppose to do, adjust.  I have an article somewhere that
talks about FSOS (Flat Surface Overuse Syndrome)

We'll be watching as you play with finding out what works for you.  As
mentioned many times.  My stuff is folklore.  If it works for you, use it.
If it doesn't don't give it any (read: ZERO) energy and find someone that
does make sense and whose folklore works for you.  And when you find that,
come back and share it with me and the others so that we can educate
ourselves better.  And finally when you can't find any good folklore,
create what works for you and then share it back here at rec.running for
all of us to play with and test and experiment with.

--
In health and on the run,
Ozzie Gontang
Maintainer - rec.running FAQ
http://www.faqs.org/faqs/by-newsgroup/rec/rec.running.html
Director, San Diego Marathon Clinic, est. 1975

Mindful Running http://www.mindfulness.com/mr.asp

 
 
 

Knee problem, runners knee and the next step.

Post by Eoin Macollam » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 06:53:53



Quote:
> See a podiatrist. Prescription orthotics completely cured my knee problems.

Seconded.  And you should also check to make sure your shoes aren't worn
down.  If you've done 400 miles in them, they probably are.

If you are not training with a specific race deadline, you should take
time off.  Then you might work on strengthening your quads.

If you do have a race deadline and/or feel you absolutely have to run,
you might try a Cho-Pat strap, which is supposed to relieve the pressure
on the patellar tendon.  Some swear by them.  I've used one but results
were inconclusive.  YMMV.

Eoin

 
 
 

Knee problem, runners knee and the next step.

Post by Neil Riddoc » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 07:33:05

I have only had the shoes since the end of April and I have only regularly
started running 20 miles a week in the last month or so, however I am
intending taking them back to the shop I got them in for an expert opion.
As for a deadline I am hopeing to do the London marathon next April (if i
get a place) so I would rather take time off now rather than later. So I am
going to try a week off from running and see what it feels like.
Strengthing and flexibilty seem to be the way to go for long term recovery
and prevention.
I am not sure if Cho-Pat straps are easily available in the UK.

Cheers for your help
Neil Riddoch


Quote:


> > See a podiatrist. Prescription orthotics completely cured my knee
problems.

> Seconded.  And you should also check to make sure your shoes aren't worn
> down.  If you've done 400 miles in them, they probably are.

> If you are not training with a specific race deadline, you should take
> time off.  Then you might work on strengthening your quads.

> If you do have a race deadline and/or feel you absolutely have to run,
> you might try a Cho-Pat strap, which is supposed to relieve the pressure
> on the patellar tendon.  Some swear by them.  I've used one but results
> were inconclusive.  YMMV.

> Eoin

 
 
 

Knee problem, runners knee and the next step.

Post by Migue » Thu, 06 Sep 2001 21:10:37

Quote:
> Don't know how much running you're doing so don't know if it's about
> cutting down.  Practice lifting the knees as in marching in place and lean
> from the ankle.  Land softly ball then heel.  As soon as the heel touches
> that triggers the lifting of the other knee.  The transition means you
> don't have to jump up and down with each step.

If the lifting of one knee wait the touch of the hell of the other,
always have a leg in contact with the ground?

Miguel