The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Roger 200 » Sun, 03 Oct 1999 04:00:00


I hope this hasn't been posted yet, I don't remember seeing it before, but
when I read it in "The Wartons' Stretch Book" I thought it was prefect.

I'd love to use the whole quote, but I think the end of it will get the
point across.

Found on page 154:
The difference between a "runner" and a "jogger" is a fancy watch.  Runner's
got one  Jogger doesn't.

Roger

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Clar » Sun, 03 Oct 1999 04:00:00

    That's funny.  Most the runners I know still use a no-frills
Timex--usually battered and torn.  It's the two-miles-four-times-a-week
types that have all the latest gadgets.  The way I tell between a runner and
a jogger--joggers have clean shoes.

-Jason

Quote:
> The difference between a "runner" and a "jogger" is a fancy watch.
Runner's
> got one  Jogger doesn't.

> Roger


 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Andy Gur » Sun, 03 Oct 1999 04:00:00

   Hi:
   Westerners have a saying about urban cowboys: 'No cattle and all hat'.
Howabout 'All sports clothes and no sweat'.

   Seriously, the difference for me was not speed, but dedication. The
first day I ran in a *cold* rain was when I realized, this was running.

   Andy

--
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unread. Commercial electronic mail to my e-mail address denotes
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e-mail. All other e-mail is welcome.

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Sam » Sun, 03 Oct 1999 04:00:00

No...a jogger has to ask;  a runner does not.


Quote:
> I hope this hasn't been posted yet, I don't remember seeing it before, but
> when I read it in "The Wartons' Stretch Book" I thought it was prefect.

> I'd love to use the whole quote, but I think the end of it will get the
> point across.

> Found on page 154:
> The difference between a "runner" and a "jogger" is a fancy watch.
Runner's
> got one  Jogger doesn't.

> Roger

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by ParmaLig » Sun, 03 Oct 1999 04:00:00

Runners are too tired to care.
 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by PEZZ » Mon, 04 Oct 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>The difference between a "runner" and a "jogger" is a fancy watch.  Runner's
>got one  Jogger doesn't.

That answers it!!!  I'M A RUNNER!!!, I'M A RUNNER!!!, I'M A RUNNER!!!.........
NANNY, NANNY, BO BOO!!!

Patty - Happy about my "New" title.  :)

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by PEZZ » Mon, 04 Oct 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>No...a jogger has to ask;  a runner does not.

Oops........... there goes all the wind out of my sails!!

P.

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by MaryO » Mon, 04 Oct 1999 04:00:00

That really does make the most sense of anything that I have seen in this
thread or any of its predecessors.  "A jogger has to ask; a runner doesn't."
Very insightful. It does explain the difference.
Mary
 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Keith Harris » Mon, 04 Oct 1999 04:00:00

Ok, so then what do you say to the non-runner who says they saw you jogging on
your lunch hour?
Quote:
>That really does make the most sense of anything that I have seen in this
>thread or any of its predecessors.  "A jogger has to ask; a runner doesn't."
>Very insightful. It does explain the difference.
>Mary

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Ivo van der Putte » Tue, 05 Oct 1999 04:00:00

Do not say anything, just kill em . .

--

Ivo van der Putten
http://home.worldonline.nl/~iputten


Quote:
> Ok, so then what do you say to the non-runner who says they saw you
jogging on
> your lunch hour?

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Robert Grumbi » Tue, 05 Oct 1999 04:00:00


Quote:

>Ok, so then what do you say to the non-runner who says they saw you jogging on
>your lunch hour?

  Why weren't you there with me?

  Actually, a non-issue for me -- I've been called a runner at times when,
by my standards for myself, I was jogging, so it goes both ways.

  Sometimes I run, sometimes I jog, and since I do both for myself,
it really doesn't matter what someone else labels it.

--
Robert Grumbine http://www.radix.net/~bobg/ Science faqs and amateur activities notes and links.
Sagredo (Galileo Galilei) "You present these recondite matters with too much
evidence and ease; this great facility makes them less appreciated than they
would be had they been presented in a more abstruse manner." Two New Sciences

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by ultrajo.. » Tue, 05 Oct 1999 04:00:00

i like mine better

i use to do a little but a little wasn't doing so a little got more and
more

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Robert Mege » Tue, 05 Oct 1999 04:00:00

To state the obvious:

        One person's run is another's jog.

Robert "fitting either side of the equation works for me" Megert

Happy Running!

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Peter Ausekli » Tue, 05 Oct 1999 04:00:00

Quote:
>> Found on page 154:
>> The difference between a "runner" and a "jogger" is a fancy watch.
>>Runner's got one  Jogger doesn't.

I heard that a jogger is someone who runs wearing a t-shirt with an
ironed-on design of a kitten and matching terry cloth wristbands and
headband.

(Before the flames hit, that's not even my opinion.  I heard it in a
store that sells running gear.)

--Peter

 
 
 

The difference between "runner" and "jogger"

Post by Jimmy Streble » Tue, 05 Oct 1999 04:00:00

An oldie but a goodie:

The difference between a runner and a jogger is a bib number.


Quote:
> >> Found on page 154:
> >> The difference between a "runner" and a "jogger" is a fancy watch.
> >>Runner's got one  Jogger doesn't.

> I heard that a jogger is someone who runs wearing a t-shirt with an
> ironed-on design of a kitten and matching terry cloth wristbands and
> headband.

> (Before the flames hit, that's not even my opinion.  I heard it in a
> store that sells running gear.)

> --Peter