Newbie question

Newbie question

Post by cburnet » Mon, 18 May 1998 04:00:00


Is it normal to feel better at the end of a run, physically, then at the
beginning?

I always feel stronger during the last 30% of my runs, I have no pains, not
short of breath, and my pace is slightly quicker.

Also, how do you figure your in the "zone" for maximum weight lost?  What is
the pulse you should be reading?  10 beats? 20 beats?

Thanks

 
 
 

Newbie question

Post by joshp.. » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00

if you feel better at the end of a run it means that you could do more, but
not that you have to. there is also the endorfin rush (runners high) that
contributes to this feeling.

 
 
 

Newbie question

Post by mass runne » Tue, 19 May 1998 04:00:00

How long did you warm-up and how long was the run.  I feel very stiff the
first about 3/4 of a mile.  At mile 1.5 I'm feeling pretty good.  At mile 2
the legs feel great and want to push.

Being new, you don't want to run too long at the beginning.  Maybe try to
warm up first some other way like biking (or stationary Bike), swim, low
impact aerobics, etc.  Try to hit the run during the part your body and legs
feel their best.

In this way, you can get the most out of the exercise while not pushing too
hard in the beginning of your training to run.

Quote:

>Is it normal to feel better at the end of a run, physically, then at the
>beginning?

>I always feel stronger during the last 30% of my runs, I have no pains, not
>short of breath, and my pace is slightly quicker.

>Also, how do you figure your in the "zone" for maximum weight lost?  What
is
>the pulse you should be reading?  10 beats? 20 beats?

>Thanks


 
 
 

Newbie question

Post by Ben Y » Wed, 20 May 1998 04:00:00


Quote:

>Is it normal to feel better at the end of a run, physically, then at the
>beginning?

sure... depends on how long you run and how long it takes fo ryou
to warm up.  I take awhile to warm up (15 to 25 min depending on
sleep/diet/etc..). so if i only run 35 minutes that day, i definitely
will feel stronger at the end

sometimes it's mental (i.e. like lifting weights, as i'm on my
last set i REALLY want to make it count so i find i put it out
more effort)

sometimes it's terrain (do you run flat?  hills?)..sometimes it's
the wind.

Quote:

>Also, how do you figure your in the "zone" for maximum weight lost?  What is
>the pulse you should be reading?  10 beats? 20 beats?

well, for "maximum" weight loss of course the harder you are working
the more weight you will lose, and the harder you work the higher your
heartbeat will go up

-ben

 
 
 

Newbie question

Post by Steve Brow » Wed, 20 May 1998 04:00:00

Quote:

>Also, how do you figure your in the "zone" for maximum weight lost?  What is
>the pulse you should be reading?  10 beats? 20 beats?

I'll take a stab at it fresh, and maybe Rick can correct me if I'm wrong ;-)

First, the physiology of running dictates that two substances will be used
as fuel during exercise. One is a sugary-based substance like glucose
the other fat based, as in fatty acid.

The "zone" is where the ratio of fatty to glucose based fuel consumption favors
the former. When you begin exercise you burn relatively more glucose
and the longer you go, the more fatty fuel you burn relative to glucose. This
change occurs somewhere between 40-50 minutes.

So, first, you should set a goal of exercising ~1 hour.

Then, to truly understand weight loss, you must realize it is a function of caloric
intake vs expenditure. So, the higher you perform (as measured in MHR
for example) for that hour, the more calories you'll burn and the more
relative fat you'll consume. Target ~75% of MHR.

But as Rick has pointed out, the net amount of fat consumed during this
time is marginal at best. So, for truly long-term weight loss the rest of the
day is equally important as the hour of exercise. Only by combining the
long run with sensible diet are you assured to meet or exceed your weight
loss goal.

In practice, this has been my experience. I've also had good luck
with "The Zone" diet during this time...But that's another story all together.

Steve Brown