Jack Daniels anyone?

Jack Daniels anyone?

Post by Cannon Turne » Sun, 28 May 2000 04:00:00


Can anyone tell me about this running program that I've been hearing a lot
about?  What does it recomend?

Thanks,

Cannon

 
 
 

Jack Daniels anyone?

Post by Jenn e f » Sun, 28 May 2000 04:00:00

<< Subject: Jack Daniels anyone?

Date: Sat, May 27, 2000 1:35 >>

<< Can anyone tell me about this running program that I've been hearing a lot
about?  What does it recomend? >>

It's best if you buy the book, "The Running Formula."

But, in very general terms, the Jack Daniels method involves a 24 week training
program:  
Phase I:  6 weeks of easy running
Phase II:  Adds tempo
Phase III:  Adds intervals, reps to the tempo
Phase IV:   More of Phase III but more specific to the race you are aiming for.

You must figure (from race results) your:
-Easy pace, which is the same as
-Long run pace.
-Interval pace
-repetition pace
-Tempo pace
-Marathon pace

As you progress through phases I, II, III, and IV you add more quality from the
above list.

My observations thus far, are that first, 24 weeks is a long time and second,
the schedule is somewhat tedious.  The program's benefits remain to be seen.

---------
Jennifer - coming to you live from the 4th week of Phase I

 
 
 

Jack Daniels anyone?

Post by Steve Freide » Sun, 28 May 2000 04:00:00

In which phase do you _drink_ the Jack Daniels?

-S-

 
 
 

Jack Daniels anyone?

Post by Roger 2 » Sun, 28 May 2000 04:00:00

Steve,

Come on now, everybody knows the answer to that one.

At the finish line phase, and you don't even have to win!

Roger

Quote:

>In which phase do you _drink_ the Jack Daniels?

>-S-

 
 
 

Jack Daniels anyone?

Post by Lorne Sund » Sun, 28 May 2000 04:00:00


Quote:
>You must figure (from race results) your:
>-Easy pace, which is the same as
>-Long run pace.
>-Interval pace
>-repetition pace
>-Tempo pace
>-Marathon pace

What I like about Daniels' approach is that he takes time to explain the
science of training through chapter 3, then explains the value, objective,
and approach to each type of training through the next 7 chapters.  Most
books say "you need to run intervals" - Daniels tells you why and how, what
they do to you, how they help you, etc, in a lot more/better detail than
most.

I like the routine of determining your VDOT (velocity at VO2max) from past
race times, which then determines your training paces, which is then
incorporated into the (abundant) generic schedules.  The sked is the same
for everyone - Jenn would run the same tempo workout as I would, but our
pace (called T for tempo) would differ (for the record, hers would be one
time zone faster than mine).

I found, though, as a beginning marathoner, the marathon schedule to be
very intimidating - over 20 different kinds of workouts scattered through
24 weeks.  But, I used the Daniels program to train for a 10 mile race and
loved it - somewhat simpler at a shorter distance, good variety.

I'm looking forward to getting Jenn's report (in 20 weeks) on how this
program compares to her past marathon programs, in terms of results as well
as training "comfort" (i.e. injury impacts, psychological impacts).
--
Lorne Sundby

 
 
 

Jack Daniels anyone?

Post by th.. » Wed, 31 May 2000 04:00:00

I had great results with the Daniels's program.  2 minutes off my 5K in one year,
but
alot of hard work.

I had mixed results with his marathon program.  I should have cut back a bit on
the mileage added a bit more quality.  I arrived at the marathon sluggish - of
course
the 75 temp did not help either.

If you read the book , you'll see that he recommends being (somewhat) flexible in
your training and going with your strengths.  Of course, if you can't be so
"flexible" that
you start skipping alot of the workouts.

Also, for his "easy" pace.  I try to run that pace or SLOWER.  Sometimes his easy
pace
is just to hard - especially after those consecutive hard days.  It should not make
a
big difference since this is aerobic training and "time" spent trainig at that
intensity is
key.

Hope this helps
George

Quote:

> << Subject: Jack Daniels anyone?

> Date: Sat, May 27, 2000 1:35 >>

> << Can anyone tell me about this running program that I've been hearing a lot
> about?  What does it recomend? >>

> It's best if you buy the book, "The Running Formula."

> But, in very general terms, the Jack Daniels method involves a 24 week training
> program:
> Phase I:  6 weeks of easy running
> Phase II:  Adds tempo
> Phase III:  Adds intervals, reps to the tempo
> Phase IV:   More of Phase III but more specific to the race you are aiming for.

> You must figure (from race results) your:
> -Easy pace, which is the same as
> -Long run pace.
> -Interval pace
> -repetition pace
> -Tempo pace
> -Marathon pace

> As you progress through phases I, II, III, and IV you add more quality from the
> above list.

> My observations thus far, are that first, 24 weeks is a long time and second,
> the schedule is somewhat tedious.  The program's benefits remain to be seen.

> ---------
> Jennifer - coming to you live from the 4th week of Phase I

 
 
 

Jack Daniels anyone?

Post by Tom » Thu, 01 Jun 2000 04:00:00



Quote:

> >You must figure (from race results) your:
> >-Easy pace, which is the same as
---snip---
> I found, though, as a beginning marathoner, the marathon schedule to be
> very intimidating - over 20 different kinds of workouts scattered through
> 24 weeks.  But, I used the Daniels program to train for a 10 mile race
and
> loved it - somewhat simpler at a shorter distance, good variety.

I tried his marathon program for about 13 weeks and loved it -- like
getting some hard, short stuff in the second six weeks.  But after 13 weeks
I lost my nerve with the program, and started doing my long runs a little
longer and ended up hurt.  I guess I am not a particularly fast runner, and
I was used to doing more miles on the LSD runs.  His tables were a great
help in trying to figure out paces however.
--
Tom I.       -- into week 25, ibuprofen pace --