High HR during 5K

High HR during 5K

Post by Ed Whi » Tue, 04 Mar 1997 04:00:00


I ran my first race, a 5K in Bear Creek PA, this weekend with a Polar Edge
NV HR monitor.  During my way out, my HR got up to 191 bpm, at which point
I slowed down.  My HR stayed above 150 bpm (I,m 44) for most of the race,
even though I felt great and had plenty of energy during the entire run.  I
attribute the high HR to taking a preventive dose of albuterol (asthma
medicine) before the race to prevent exercise induced asthma (the weather
was cloudy and in the 40's).  My final race time was 26:04.8, mainly
because I held myself back to keep my HR down.

I have three questions concerning my HR:

1-does this mean my maximum HR is 191, or should I discount this because of
the albuterol?

2-what should my HR be during a 5K race?  60% of max? 70% of max? 85% of
max?  My resting HR is 49 bpm.

3-I had a stress test done 2-3 years ago when I was morbidly obese (I
weighed 220 lbs on a 5ft 4inc frame, I now weigh 142 lbs).  Should I call
my doctor to find out what my maximum HR was then, or is that number
meaningless now that I am fit.  I will go to the local sports medicine
clinic for stress testing if necessary, but I hate to waste the money if a
number a couple of years ago is still good.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Ed White

 
 
 

High HR during 5K

Post by Miles Laki » Tue, 04 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> NV HR monitor.  During my way out, my HR got up to 191 bpm, at which point
> I slowed down.  My HR stayed above 150 bpm (I,m 44) for most of the race,
> even though I felt great and had plenty of energy during the entire run.  I

Firstly, I have no medical training.

Be aware that the 'standard' formula for estimating MHR (220-age) has an
estimated standard deviation of 10-12 bpm (*). For you, 220-44=176. If
we now add 24 to cover 2 S.D.'s, we see obtain a range between 152 and
200. And still we would expect the MHR of 1 in 3 44 year olds to lie
outside this range!!!

So, on this basis, the figure of 191 is not unreasonable.

(*) Source, ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, 5th
Edition, p. 274, Williams and Wilkins.

Quote:
> I have three questions concerning my HR:

> 1-does this mean my maximum HR is 191, or should I discount this because of
> the albuterol?

I don't know.

Quote:
> 2-what should my HR be during a 5K race?  60% of max? 70% of max? 85% of
> max?  My resting HR is 49 bpm.

From an athletic point of view, as high as you can manage for the
duration of the race. Depends how fit you are. But has your doc given
you the ok for racing? What does s/he recommend from a medical
viewpoint?

Quote:
> 3-I had a stress test done 2-3 years ago when I was morbidly obese (I
> weighed 220 lbs on a 5ft 4inc frame, I now weigh 142 lbs).  Should I call
> my doctor to find out what my maximum HR was then, or is that number
> meaningless now that I am fit.  I will go to the local sports medicine
> clinic for stress testing if necessary, but I hate to waste the money if a
> number a couple of years ago is still good.

You can't be too careful about these things. Definitely go and speak to
your doctor. Knowing what your MHR was when you had the stress test may
also be some help.

  Miles

 
 
 

High HR during 5K

Post by WTC4 » Tue, 04 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> NV HR monitor.  During my way out, my HR got up to 191 bpm, at which
point
> I slowed down.  My HR stayed above 150 bpm (I,m 44) for most of the
race,
> even though I felt great and had plenty of energy during the entire run.
> I have three questions concerning my HR:

> 1-does this mean my maximum HR is 191, or should I discount this because
of
> the albuterol?

Your MHR is at least 191.

Quote:
> 2-what should my HR be during a 5K race?  60% of max? 70% of max? 85% of
> max?  My resting HR is 49 bpm.

A HR of 90% is not unusual in a 10k race, if you're pretty fit.  Mine runs
about 180, which is close to 90% (MHR 192, resting in low 50's).  The
longer the race, the lower the percentage.



 
 
 

High HR during 5K

Post by Sam Calla » Thu, 06 Mar 1997 04:00:00

Quote:

> I ran my first race, a 5K in Bear Creek PA, this weekend with a Polar Edge
> NV HR monitor.  During my way out, my HR got up to 191 bpm, at which point
> I slowed down.  My HR stayed above 150 bpm (I,m 44) for most of the race,
> even though I felt great and had plenty of energy during the entire run.  I
> attribute the high HR to taking a preventive dose of albuterol (asthma
> medicine) before the race to prevent exercise induced asthma (the weather
> was cloudy and in the 40's).  My final race time was 26:04.8, mainly
> because I held myself back to keep my HR down.

> I have three questions concerning my HR:

> 1-does this mean my maximum HR is 191, or should I discount this because of
> the albuterol?

        I do not have a PDR handy and would only read out of it:  Ask your
doctor about the effects of albuterol on HR.  In theory, if you are going
to take this med all the time, then the MHR on the drug should be
considered your MHR.  (Cardiac rehab does the same thing except  usually
the *** lower HR.)

Quote:

> 2-what should my HR be during a 5K race?  60% of max? 70% of max? 85% of
> max?  My resting HR is 49 bpm.

        A 5K is run at near max.  If you are wanting to run a fast time,
it normally is 85+% max or more (have not run a 5K in a while).  On a
recent 10K my average HR was 95% of measured max so I would imagine that a
5K HR would be close to that.

Quote:

> 3-I had a stress test done 2-3 years ago when I was morbidly obese (I
> weighed 220 lbs on a 5ft 4inc frame, I now weigh 142 lbs).  Should I call
> my doctor to find out what my maximum HR was then, or is that number
> meaningless now that I am fit.  I will go to the local sports medicine
> clinic for stress testing if necessary, but I hate to waste the money if a
> number a couple of years ago is still good.

> Thanks in advance for any help.

> Ed White


        Your MHR might be different because then you may have stopped the
test before reaching it (being overweight, I will assume that you were not
very well conditioner and your peripheral system may ahve stopped you
before your cardiopulmonary system did).

If you have another one done, ask them to choose a protocol that allows
you to run at a 0% grade with increased speed every 3 mintues until a
maximum speed for you is reached
(generally about 5K speed).  Then have them add grade.  This will give you
HRs at various intensities so that you know that speed X equals HR Y which
will help you gauge your efforts.  If the clinic has a metabolic cart, ask
how much extra it is, that way you will have a measure of your VO2 max
(the preferred method of adjusting training intensity).

If you like, I can fax or post a protocol for you to use.

=========================================================================
Sam Callan

I hate the "Zone" and I hate the fat burning myth!
Just so you know where I stand!