Beginner's training question

Beginner's training question

Post by Jack » Thu, 04 Sep 2008 03:31:03


So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc.  I'm told never to do
more than two days in a row.  How's that sound?
 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by johnbhur.. » Thu, 04 Sep 2008 07:09:14


Quote:
> So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc. ?I'm told never to do
> more than two days in a row. ?How's that sound?

Well everything changes over time ... eventually.  So the never word
is probably only for a while.  I go 6 days on 1 off typically.

Many people starting up can only do 1 day on and 1 day off.  It's all
relative to what kind of base shape you are in, your age, your weight,
any existing health problems or medical concerns, etc.

We could be a lot more useful here and give potentially useful info if
we knew more about you.

What makes you want to run?  Do you like it or hate it?  What are your
goals short term and longer term?

Probably another early question should be ... do you have something
semi decent as a shoe to run in?

Then go back to any info you want to supply about base shape/age/
weight/etc.

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by Mark Clear » Thu, 04 Sep 2008 07:29:25

Someone told you wrong, you can do many days or weeks or even months in
a row, but I don't recommend it. If you can run about 10 minutes without
stopping then build up each day about a minute. After you get to where
you can run at whatever pace for about 20 minutes then you need to see
how you feel. I would run mostly every day at that small amount take one
day off a week. Do this for maybe 3 weeks and if it gets easy then take
one day a week and try an run at least 30 minutes with no stops. If you
can keep going for 30 minutes without stopping then you probably need to
listen to your body and progress from that point if you need more.

Remember all this is just off the top of my head and take it with caution.

Mark Cleary plays Hollenbeck Jazz Guitars
Handmade http://hollenbeckguitar.com/

Quote:

> So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc.  I'm told never to do
> more than two days in a row.  How's that sound?


 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by Lisbeth Andersso » Fri, 05 Sep 2008 04:57:54



Quote:
> So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc.  I'm told
> never to do more than two days in a row.  How's that sound?

That depends on what you are doing on your "on" days. The program I
started with (Runners world 30/30 program) had 30 days on, and then
switch to another program. Although the activity each day was not very
much. 30 minutes total and no more than 7.5 min running. I'm not very
good at following instructions and took one day off each week.

Lisbeth.

----
The day I don't learn anything new is the day I die.

*What we know is not nearly as interesting as *how we know it.
** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by Dot » Fri, 05 Sep 2008 05:11:30

Quote:

> So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc.  I'm told never to do
> more than two days in a row.  How's that sound?

Was this a suggestion for you as a new runner? or some rest of life
situations or ...?  Some people start with 3 day/wk, some with every
other day, some progress to 4 days/wk, some to 5 and more, which will
require 3 or more days in a row. Do what works for you. How you start
may have little to do with how you progress over the years - other than
if you start too hard and get injured.

Dot

--
"Magic rocks and roots - the ones that trip you but you can never find
afterwards" - Matt Carpenter

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by Jack » Sat, 06 Sep 2008 07:22:53

Quote:

> So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc. I'm told never to do
> more than two days in a row.  How's
> that sound?

Well in response to everyone, I guess I didn't include much information.
I ran track & x-country in highschool.  That was 15 years ago.  I've dabbled
ever since, but now I'd like to get back into racing by next spring.  So
technically I'm not beginning but it seems that way.

But I have an achey knee than never quite goes away.  If I give it a day
off, it feels okay.  Then after two days of 4--6 miles it's right back to
aching.  It's been like this for about two months.

I'm thinking, chiropractor & new fitted shoes.

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by johnbhur.. » Sat, 06 Sep 2008 21:17:22


snip

Quote:
> > So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc. I'm told never to do
> > more than two days in a row. ?How's
> > that sound?

> Well in response to everyone, I guess I didn't include much information.
> I ran track & x-country in highschool. ?That was 15 years ago. ?I've dabbled
> ever since, but now I'd like to get back into racing by next spring. ?So
> technically I'm not beginning but it seems that way.

> But I have an achey knee than never quite goes away. ?If I give it a day
> off, it feels okay. ?Then after two days of 4--6 miles it's right back to
> aching. ?It's been like this for about two months.

That does help some Jack.

When you say "get back into racing" by next spring ... are you going
to get out there and sign up for some events ( what distances interest
you? ) or are you thinking about doing some damage in these races?  In
other words how competitive are you in your goals?

Knees are a tricky subject with runners.  One of my legs just never
bothers me the right knee just never feels more than pretty good at
times.  People ask runners all the times "doesn't it bother your
knees" and the gut level response from many is either "are they
supposed to not hurt?" or "tough it out and tune it out".  So it can
be a fine line deciding what's normal usage aches versus something
that is "not normal" and needs either some additional strengthening or
some medical attention.

Shoes are critical to keeping your ankles and knees protected.  Ya
gotta spend a bunch of cash ditching old shoes and buying new ones
that work for you.

Stay away from running on hard surfaces like concrete and asphalt as
much as you can.  Find trails or software surfaces ... run on grass
where you can.

That's about all I have.  Like I noted earlier I am on a 6 day on/1
off ( sometimes 13 on/1 off ) but I get a lot of miles on trails plus
it takes a lot of time to build to a schedule like that.

Quote:
> I'm thinking, chiropractor & new fitted shoes.

Sounds like a plan.  You probably have a bunch of old cross country
strengthening things that may also be useful.

Good luck Jack!

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by Jack » Sat, 06 Sep 2008 22:52:21

Quote:


> snip

>>> So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc.
>>> I'm told never to do more than two days in a row. How's
>>> that sound?

>> Well in response to everyone, I guess I didn't include
>> much information. I ran track & x-country in highschool.
>> That was 15 years ago. I've dabbled ever since, but now
>> I'd like to get back into racing by next spring. So
>> technically I'm not beginning but it seems that way.

>> But I have an achey knee than never quite goes away. If
>> I give it a day off, it feels okay. Then after two days
>> of 4--6 miles it's right back to aching. It's been like
>> this for about two months.

> That does help some Jack.

> When you say "get back into racing" by next spring ...
> are you going to get out there and sign up for some
> events ( what distances interest you? ) or are you
> thinking about doing some damage in these races?  In
> other words how competitive are you in your goals?

5 to 10Ks.  How competitive?  Well just trotting along and finishing is not
enough.  I guess I'm looking to return to the e***ment of those high
school x-country days.

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> Knees are a tricky subject with runners.  One of my legs
> just never bothers me the right knee just never feels
> more than pretty good at times.  People ask runners all
> the times "doesn't it bother your knees" and the gut
> level response from many is either "are they supposed to
> not hurt?" or "tough it out and tune it out".  So it can
> be a fine line deciding what's normal usage aches versus
> something that is "not normal" and needs either some
> additional strengthening or some medical attention.

> Shoes are critical to keeping your ankles and knees
> protected.  Ya gotta spend a bunch of cash ditching old
> shoes and buying new ones that work for you.

> Stay away from running on hard surfaces like concrete and
> asphalt as much as you can.  Find trails or software
> surfaces ... run on grass where you can.

I tend to run up the side of the road on the left side.  So the crown of the
road makes it so my left leg is lower than my right.  I'm sure that's not
good.

Quote:

> That's about all I have.  Like I noted earlier I am on a
> 6 day on/1 off ( sometimes 13 on/1 off ) but I get a lot
> of miles on trails plus it takes a lot of time to build
> to a schedule like that.

13 on... damn.

Quote:

>> I'm thinking, chiropractor & new fitted shoes.

> Sounds like a plan.  You probably have a bunch of old
> cross country strengthening things that may also be
> useful.

> Good luck Jack!

thanks.
 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by rick+ » Sat, 06 Sep 2008 23:21:18

I foudn rest day needs to be age-related.
I could run twice a day, 28 days a month in my 20s.
I find once a day 25 days a month is enough when older.
 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by rick+ » Sat, 06 Sep 2008 23:22:59


Quote:
> Well in response to everyone, I guess I didn't include much information.
> I ran track & x-country in highschool.  That was 15 years ago.

You'll discover very quickly you arent an indestructable ***ager any
more.
Very quickly, with lots of pain if you train too hard.
 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by Jack » Sun, 07 Sep 2008 04:08:32

Quote:


>> Well in response to everyone, I guess I didn't include
>> much information. I ran track & x-country in highschool.
>> That was 15 years ago.

> You'll discover very quickly you arent an indestructable
> ***ager any more.
> Very quickly, with lots of pain if you train too hard.

Yes I've already noticed that.
 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by Charlie Pendej » Sun, 07 Sep 2008 04:09:48

rick++:

Quote:
> I foudn rest day needs to be age-related.
> I could run twice a day, 28 days a month in my 20s.

And surely other factors too than just age.

Twice a day, every day, suited me very well indeed last I did so, aged
39.  But that was on legs with only about 4-5 years and less than
10,000 miles of running on 'em.

Some guys older than me put in 100+ mpw on doubles, though it's a
fairly rare 50ish runner who has the combination of durability, single-
minded desire, and available time for that.

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by johnbhur.. » Sun, 07 Sep 2008 07:35:14


snip

Quote:
> > I foudn rest day needs to be age-related.
> > I could run twice a day, 28 days a month in my 20s.

> And surely other factors too than just age.

> Twice a day, every day, suited me very well indeed last I did so, aged
> 39. ?But that was on legs with only about 4-5 years and less than
> 10,000 miles of running on 'em.

> Some guys older than me put in 100+ mpw on doubles, though it's a
> fairly rare 50ish runner who has the combination of durability, single-
> minded desire, and available time for that.

I agree with Charlie on the "fairly rare" part though I think the
largest part of it is the desire and available time factors.
Maybe it is the retired ultra bunch who have the time for that much
mileage but I guess a lot of them "do ultras" on fairly limited
amounts of mileage.

Running on hard pavement and concrete is brutal as you get older.  So
maybe another factor is the easily availability of softer material if
you want to keep doing doubles.

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by dizz » Sun, 07 Sep 2008 10:45:32

Quote:

>But I have an achey knee than never quite goes away.  If I give it a day
>off, it feels okay.  Then after two days of 4--6 miles it's right back to
>aching.  It's been like this for about two months.

>I'm thinking, chiropractor & new fitted shoes.

Are you sure you have the right shoes?  You've educated yourself on
the types of shoes?  You've went to a "runner's" store where they have
knowledgable staff to help you?

The importance of the right shoe cannot be overstated.

Also, pay attention to your running form.  Are your arms dangling, or
are they pumping so as to retain proper balance?  Are your legs moving
only front-and-back or do you have a sideways motion?  You don't want
twisting forces on your knees.

 
 
 

Beginner's training question

Post by dizz » Sun, 07 Sep 2008 11:07:49

Quote:


>> So I'm going to do two days on and one day off & etc. ?I'm told never to do
>> more than two days in a row. ?How's that sound?

>Well everything changes over time ... eventually.  So the never word
>is probably only for a while.  I go 6 days on 1 off typically.

Which is plenty for many, including me.  I run for fitness and fun,
and personally don't understand the "I gotta run a freaking marathon"
mentality.  I think that the training for a marathon can be abusive on
the body.  Nor do I think running 5 days a week is a sustainable
thing, for me.  It takes a lot of time and energy, and a lesser effort
still keeps me in pretty good shape, IMO.

My 15 miles a week, and being fit-enough to run a 10k at a good pace,
still puts me waaayyy ahead of the crowd, fitness-wise...